Nestle ditching plastic straws, water bottles to reduce plastic waste

January 18, 2019 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Nestle, the world’s largest packaged food company, is on a mission to reduce plastic waste. This week, the Swiss group announced they will be dropping plastic straws from their products and will also focus on creating biodegradable water bottles. With environmental groups all over the world advocating for alternatives to single-use plastic, Nestle says these changes are part of a campaign to make all of their packaging reusable or recyclable by 2025.  Beginning next month, the company will begin using different materials such as paper, and will also be replacing their plastic straws and using innovative designs to reduce litter. The company is also working with Danimer Scientific to create a new biodegradable water bottle , and with  PureCycle Technologies to develop food-grade recycled polypropylene, which is a polymer used for food packaging, specifically for food packaged in trays, tubs, cups and bottles. Nestle Waters, the bottled water unit of the Nestle brand, is also aiming to increase the content of polyethylene terephthalate, or recycled PET, in its bottles. By 2025, they have a goal of increasing the recycled PET content to 35 percent globally, and 50 percent in the United States. Related: Zero-waste packaging is coming to a freezer aisle near you Magdi Batato, Nestle’s global head of operations, says that the company is still trying to figure out the impact of the new packaging,  Reuters reports. It could possibly reduce their products’ shelf life and increase manufacturing costs, but they don’t know for sure. “Some of those alternative solutions are even cheaper, some of them are cost neutral, and indeed some of them are more expensive,” Batato said. In their press release, Nestle said that the plastic waste challenge would require a change in everyone’s behavior, and they are committed to leading the way. All 4,200 of their facilities around the globe are “committed to eliminating single-use plastic items that cannot be recycled,” and will replace those items with new materials that can easily be reused or recycled. Via Nestle and Reuters Image via Shutterstock

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Nestle ditching plastic straws, water bottles to reduce plastic waste

Closing plenary: uncovering nature’s secrets to reinvent cities

November 6, 2018 by  
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The idea of buildings as a regenerative force sounds like an environmentalist’s pipe dream, but the concept is starting to be realized in offices, factories and other facilities. It requires vision and new design thinking, but also an understanding of how “the genius of biome” can make the built environment a positive contributor to cities around the world.

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Closing plenary: uncovering nature’s secrets to reinvent cities

What’s the Post-China Ban Future for Materials Recycling Facilities?

October 26, 2018 by  
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The first materials accepted for curbside recycling had to be … The post What’s the Post-China Ban Future for Materials Recycling Facilities? appeared first on Earth911.com.

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What’s the Post-China Ban Future for Materials Recycling Facilities?

How the U.S. Open aced a sustainable transformation

September 29, 2017 by  
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Efforts involved the U.S. Tennis Association, Billie Jean King and Venus Williams.

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How the U.S. Open aced a sustainable transformation

Bee-killing pesticides have been found in US drinking water

April 7, 2017 by  
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We’ve known that neonicotinoid insecticides are bad news for bee populations for several years now, but one thing we don’t know about these pesticides is how they impact human health. A new study from the US Geological Survey and the University of Iowa reveals how terrifying that question could be, revealing minute traces of neonicotinoid chemicals are present in at least some drinking water in the US. In the study, published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology Letters , researchers took samples from two water treatment plants in Iowa. Though many might assume waste treatment plants would be able to remove pesticides from drinking water, trace amounts of the neonicotinoids were still present after passing the water through the facilities’ carbon filtration systems. Granted, the amounts present ranged from 0.24 to 57.3 nanograms per liter, which Gizmodo describes as “like a single drop of water plopped into 20 Olympic-size swimming pools.” The amount is obviously incredibly small, but unfortunately scientists have no idea whether the residue that remains in drinking water could potentially impact human health. The Environmental Protection Agency has set no regulatory limits on the use of these substances, saying that previous studies have shown they have only low rates of adverse health effects for humans. There’s a catch, though – those older studies only looked at brief exposure to high concentrations of neonicotinoids. It’s still unknown whether low-level chronic exposure could result in long-term health problems. Related: Over 700 North American bee species are heading towards extinction Ideally, more research would be done to learn more about the effect these chemicals have on human health. But with Donald Trump and his cabinet attempting to loosen regulations on industries that pollute the environment and hobbling critical environmental research, it may be a few years before we know for certain whether low levels of neonicotinoids are harmful or not. Via Gizmodo Images via Pixabay ( 1 , 2 )

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Bee-killing pesticides have been found in US drinking water

Interface: How our engineers slash massive waste, emissions

March 17, 2014 by  
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Striving for zero impact drives a push for new tech. Here are 6 lessons to help other businesses innovate.

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Interface: How our engineers slash massive waste, emissions

Cleveland Browns kick off a new waste-to-energy plan

November 26, 2013 by  
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FirstEnergy Stadium, home of the NFL team, will divert tons of food waste this season and turn it into electricity and fertilizer.

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Cleveland Browns kick off a new waste-to-energy plan

What’s in store for energy management companies in 2014?

September 10, 2013 by  
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Corporations almost universally say they need better data about energy usage, and 45 percent plan to spend more to manage energy next year.   

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What’s in store for energy management companies in 2014?

Dow and DuPont rank among the top ‘Toxic 100’ polluters

August 28, 2013 by  
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Which companies deserve the most blame for air and water pollution? Some of the worst offenders are also making progress in sustainability.

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Dow and DuPont rank among the top ‘Toxic 100’ polluters

How Kroger turned food waste into warehouse-powering energy

August 9, 2013 by  
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The company's Ralphs/Food 4 Less division is using biogas to power a California distribution center.

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How Kroger turned food waste into warehouse-powering energy

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