Exxon aims to cut methane emissions 15% by 2020

May 23, 2018 by  
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ExxonMobil isn’t typically known for climate action , but the world’s biggest publicly traded oil and gas company is now fighting climate change with greenhouse gas reduction measures. The oil and gas giant recently announced measures to lower greenhouse gas emissions , including a 15 percent drop in methane emissions , in an effort to address climate change. To slash methane emissions, Exxon is drawing on multiple initiatives, one of which is leak-detection-and-repair efforts at XTO Energy , an Exxon subsidiary focused on shale . According to the company, operational improvements at production and midstream sites in the United States, combined with the leak-detection-and-repair efforts, have lowered methane emissions by around two percent in the last year. Exxon thinks it will reach the 15 percent target with these initiatives and “additional measures outside the U.S. focused on the most significant sources of methane.” Exxon also aims for a 25 percent reduction in natural gas flaring ; it believes the most significant reductions will happen in West Africa. Related: New Exxon CEO supports Paris climate deal, carbon tax The oil and gas company describes itself as “the most energy efficient refining company in the U.S. and internationally.” It said it has reached “a 10 percent improvement in energy efficiency” across “global refining operations” after launching an effort in 2000, and that it invests in lower-emission energy solutions such as biofuels , cogeneration, and carbon capture and storage. CEO Darren Woods said in their statement, “We have a longstanding commitment to improve efficiency and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Today’s announcement builds on that commitment and will help further drive improvements in our business.” Almost two-thirds of greenhouse gases released during the last 150 years originated from 90 companies . Exxon was in the top 10, according to a 2013 study from Richard Heede at the Climate Accountability Institute; he blames the companies for most climate change . + ExxonMobil Via Reuters Images via Depositphotos (1)

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Exxon aims to cut methane emissions 15% by 2020

Chevron admits "there’s no debate about climate science" in court hearing

March 23, 2018 by  
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“From Chevron’s perspective there’s no debate about climate science ,” attorney Theodore Boutrous Jr. said in a courtroom this week. In a case pitting Big Oil companies against the cities of San Francisco and Oakland , which allege the fossil fuel corporations should pay for actions like sea walls to deal with the impacts of climate change , Chevron’s attorney acknowledged that manmade climate change is real. Don’t get too excited, though. According to Boutrous, it may be real, but it isn’t Chevron’s fault – it’s yours. United States District Judge William Alsup called for a two-part climate change tutorial  earlier this month to help educate all the parties involved in the lawsuit on climate change. During this tutorial,  Science Magazine and The Verge reported that Chevron agreed with the existing scientific consensus. The tutorial wasn’t an echo of the famous Scopes trial, according to Alsup. Science Magazine said he told the audience, “This will not be withering cross-examinations and so forth. This will be numbers and diagrams, and if you get bored you can just leave.” Prominent scientists spoke for San Francisco and Oakland, but Boutrous was the sole speaker for the oil industry — and he said, “Chevron accepts what the IPCC [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change] has reached consensus on concerning science and climate change.” Related: Federal court orders first hearing on the science of climate change Boutrous did emphasize parts of the IPCC’s fifth climate science assessment report regarding uncertainties, according to Science Magazine, such as challenges over predictions of sea level rise in particular parts of the planet or modeling Antarctic ice’s response to increasing temperatures. Even if Chevron does agree on the science, they don’t seem to agree a lawsuit is the correct way to tackle climate change — Boutrous described it as a global issue necessitating global action. Chevron spokesperson Sean Comey told The Verge the company “welcomes meaningful efforts to address the issue of climate change, but litigation is not an appropriate tool for accomplishing that objective.” He also claims that Chevron is no more to blame for climate change than anyone else. “Anyone in the world could be brought in in the case, including the plaintiffs themselves,” he said. Which gets to the crux of the argument: Chevron claims that burning fossil fuels is to blame, so it rests on the shoulders of those driving cars or heating their homes with coal to stop climate change. But the plaintiffs argue that, like the cigarette companies in the past, companies like Chevron knew about the impact of their product on the environment and chose to continue pushing it. Science Magazine said Exxon, BP, Royal Dutch Shell, and ConocoPhillips, the other oil companies involved, stayed away from the tutorial as they have questioned Alsup’s jurisdiction to hear the case. Alsup afforded them two weeks to disagree with what Boutrous had to say, or he’ll assume they’re in agreement. Via The Verge and Science Magazine Images via Depositphotos and Pixabay

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Chevron admits "there’s no debate about climate science" in court hearing

This lawyer wants Big Oil to pay for climate change

December 26, 2017 by  
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Steve Berman is perhaps best known for winning a $206 billion settlement from tobacco companies in the 1990s, although he’s also taken on big companies like Enron and Volkswagen. Now he’s setting his sights on fossil fuel companies. Vice spoke to Berman about a lawsuit demanding five of the most powerful oil companies in the world pay for causing climate change . Berman, the managing partner of Hagens Berman , is one of the attorneys representing San Francisco and Oakland in two lawsuits filed against BP, Chevron, Exxon, Royal Dutch Shell, and ConocoPhillips “alleging that the Big Oil giants are responsible for the cities’ costs of protecting themselves from global warming-induced sea level rise , including expenses to construct seawalls to protect the two cities’ more than five million residents,” according to Hagens Berman. Related: UNEP chief: Polluters should pay for environmental destruction, not taxpayers The case suggests Big Oil borrowed moves from Big Tobacco, which researched cancer even as tobacco companies denied cigarettes were harmful. Berman has evidence that Exxon , for example, knew burning oil leads to global warming in the 1950’s – and oil companies worked to protect Arctic pipelines and offshore oil rigs from the impacts of climate change even as they denied the science. Vice pointed out no one has yet won a similar lawsuit. A Chevron spokesperson told Vice, “Should this litigation proceed, it will only serve special interests at the expense of broader policy, regulatory, and economic priorities.” Berman failed to win a lawsuit like this one in 2012, when he attempted to hold fossil fuel companies including Exxon responsible for the sea level rise threatening Kivalina, Alaska. A federal court dismissed the case; United States District Judge Saundra Brown Armstrong wrote, “There is no realistic possibility of tracing any particular alleged effect of global warming to any particular emissions by any specific person, entity, group at any particular point in time.” Leaps in climate science since then could help Berman in this new lawsuit. Researchers have calculated nearly two-thirds of greenhouse gases emitted during the past 150 years can be connected back to 90 companies; BP, Chevron, Exxon, ConocoPhillips, and Shell are in the top ten, according to Vice. Berman told the publication, “We have better science . We think causation will be easier to prove.” Via Vice and Hagens Berman Images via Depositphotos ( 1 , 2 )

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This lawyer wants Big Oil to pay for climate change

Canadas newest funicular makes one of North Americas largest urban parklands more accessible

December 26, 2017 by  
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Edmonton wants you to see it from a new point of view—literally. The Canadian city recently launched a $24 million funicular that links the valley floor to a 20-meter cantilevered lookout with sweeping views of the North Saskatchewan River. Clad in the eco-friendly timber material Kebony, the cable-mechanized incline elevator designed by Canadian firm Dialog Architects taps into an old yet charming transit method in hopes of boosting tourism and access to the Edmonton River Valley, one of North America’s largest areas of urban parkland. Estimated to be approximately 21 times larger than New York City’s Central Park , Edmonton River Valley is a linear park system connecting 22 major parks with over 150 kilometers of trails. The new publicly funded river valley funicular and lookout —formally known as the 100 Street Funicular and Frederick G. Todd Lookout—offers a new way for citizens and tourists to access the green space from the downtown core. The funicular can transport mobility aids, bikes, and strollers, and is complemented by a staircase. There is no charge to use the funicular, which can hold up to 20 people at a time. Related: New Edmonton Freezeway communal ice trail opens in Canada “The project is an entrance to the river valley for everyone, regardless of age and ability, and a focal point that will bring people together in the heart of Edmonton,” said Dialog Architects. “It allows Edmontonians to become tourists in their own backyard. The City of Edmonton has long sought to improve connectivity for the public between urban areas and the North Saskatchewan River valley, and this project is a major step towards greater connectivity throughout the city.” Kebony wood, used for decking, cladding, and seating accents, was chosen for its resistance to rot and ability to last six times longer than pressure-treated wood. + Dialog Architects Via ArchDaily Images © Brock Kryton

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Canadas newest funicular makes one of North Americas largest urban parklands more accessible

A bipartisan price on carbon? Here’s what to watch for

June 20, 2017 by  
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The recently formed Climate Leadership Council has signed big founding backers like General Motors, PepsiCo and ExxonMobile in its bid to advance a “carbon dividend” model.

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ExxonMobil wants a sanctions waiver for Russian oil project

April 20, 2017 by  
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The United States imposed sanctions on Russia back in 2014 after Moscow annexed Crimea. But it appears oil giant ExxonMobil would like an exception for their own profit. They’re seeking a sanctions waiver from the U.S. Treasury Department to pursue drilling in the Black Sea with Russian state-owned oil company Rosneft . It seems U.S. sanctions are just too inconvenient for ExxonMobil . Apparently they sent in their waiver application when Barack Obama was president, and did not drop it once Donald Trump entered office. The application didn’t come up during Senate hearings for former ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson before he was confirmed as Secretary of State. Tillerson and other ExxonMobil officials then said they hadn’t lobbied against the sanctions on Russia. Related: Americans don’t trust climate change science because of fossil fuel industry’s disinformation Tillerson and the officials said ExxonMobil did receive a waiver to finish drilling an exploration well in Arctic waters near Russia. ExxonMobil officials also said they’d exhorted members of the Obama administration to align U.S. sanctions with European sanctions which allowed some flexibility for European companies to continue working on Russian projects. The Wall Street Journal first reported on ExxonMobil’s sanctions waiver request yesterday, and The New York Times confirmed the story with an oil industry official. An ExxonMobil spokesperson refused to comment to The New York Times on the waiver application. The application will go before the Trump administration at a tenuous time, as an inquiry into Russia’s potential influence on the American presidential election continues. At a 2014 Exxon annual meeting, Tillerson as CEO said, “We do not support sanctions, generally, because we don’t find them to be effective unless they are very well implemented comprehensively, and that’s a very hard thing to do.” But as Secretary of State he has not suggested sanctions be lifted. Rosneft and Exxon made a deal back in 2011 to invest $3.2 billion to explore the Black Sea and the Arctic Ocean, with the pledge to share in the findings if oil were discovered. Obama’s U.S. ambassador to Russia, Michael A. McFaul, said on Twitter , “If the Trump administration approves this waiver, then all that tough talk last week about Russia was just that – talk.” Via The New York Times Images via Wikimedia Commons and President of Russia

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ExxonMobil wants a sanctions waiver for Russian oil project

This amazing light-filled tiny house packs big style for just $35k

April 20, 2017 by  
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You don’t have to sacrifice style to live a minimal lifestyle. Case in point: this Tiny home may be ultra-compact at just 176-square-feet, but the interior is so sophisticated that its small size goes virtually unnoticed. The best part? It can be yours for just $35,000 This tiny home’s layout and design were optimized to create a comfortable living area. Space-saving features like hidden storage and custom cabinets keep the interior clutter-free. The large sliding glass door, along with plenty of windows, flood the interior with ample natural light . Related: Architecture graduate celebrates her first year living in a tiny home she built herself The compact home, which was designed and built by the owners, has almost everything found in a conventional home minus the extra space. A sleeping loft with enough room to accommodate a full size mattress is reached by a narrow staircase. The living area is spacious thanks to the high ceilings and minimal furniture. Even the kitchen’s small size is hardly noticeable thanks to custom-made cabinets and shelving. Via Tiny House Listings Photos via Tiny House Listings

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This amazing light-filled tiny house packs big style for just $35k

Exxon Blames 60-Year-Old Manufacturing Defect for 290,000 Gallon Arkansas Spill

July 15, 2013 by  
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Photo via Shutterstock After an investigation into the rupture of the Exxon Mobil Pegasus pipeline that caused around 290,000 gallons of oil to leak into the small Arkansas town of Mayflower in March, the oil giant has issued a statement that cites a decades-old manufacturing defect as the cause of the environmental disaster. While this suggests that it was not corrosion from Tar Sands oil that caused the rupture, it does raise concerns as to the integrity of the pipeline, which runs from Illinois to Texas. Read the rest of Exxon Blames 60-Year-Old Manufacturing Defect for 290,000 Gallon Arkansas Spill Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: arkansas , arkansas oil , clean water act , environmental diaster , Exxon , exxon disaster , exxon mobil , exxon pipeline , mayflower , mayflower oil , oil , oil leak , oil pollution , oil spill , pegasus , pegasus pipeline , pipeline rupture , tar sands        

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Exxon Blames 60-Year-Old Manufacturing Defect for 290,000 Gallon Arkansas Spill

Bazz the Beekeeper’s Dog Sniffs Out Bee Disease in an Adorable Custom Suit

July 15, 2013 by  
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A black labrador named Bazz has joined the global ranks of beekeepers who are fighting to save the world’s pollinators – and he even has an adorable custom suit to protect him on the job. Like Boneco the donkey in Brazil, Bazz does important but dangerous work: his owner, Josh Kennett from Australia, trained him to sniff out American foulbrood disease, an incurable disease that can decimate bee populations if it isn’t detected early. Read the rest of Bazz the Beekeeper’s Dog Sniffs Out Bee Disease in an Adorable Custom Suit Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: agriculture , American foulbrood disease , Animals , Bazz the Beekeeper’s dog , beekeeper’s dog , beekeepers , bees , Environment , News , pollinators , sniffer dog detects bee disease        

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Bazz the Beekeeper’s Dog Sniffs Out Bee Disease in an Adorable Custom Suit

US Department of Justice and Arkansas Sue Exxon Over Mayflower Oil Spill

June 24, 2013 by  
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Photo via Shutterstock In March, Exxon’s Pegasus pipeline ruptured in the suburban town of Mayflower , Arkansas. Hundreds of thousands of gallons of bitumen from leaked into neighborhoods and waterways from a 22-foot gash, including the nearby Lake Conway. While Exxon promised that the heavy tar sands oil would not find its way into the lake, internal emails stated that the company lied about the extent of its pollution. In response, the Department of Justice and the state of Arkansas decided to  sue Exxon earlier this month demanding $1,100-$4,300 for each barrel that made its way into the environment as well as $45,000 a day for violating state pollution storage laws. Read the rest of US Department of Justice and Arkansas Sue Exxon Over Mayflower Oil Spill Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: arkansas , bitumen , department of environmental quality , Department of Justice , exxonmobil , lake conway , mayflower , obama administration , pegasus pipeline , rupture , spill , tar sands , transcanada        

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US Department of Justice and Arkansas Sue Exxon Over Mayflower Oil Spill

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