Green-roofed Kew Gardens Hill Library lures patrons indoors with a lifted facade

December 1, 2017 by  
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A branch library in New York City is luring the community indoors with a clever facade that lifts up at the corner to reveal glimpses of the happenings inside. Local firm Work Architecture Company recently announced the long-awaited opening of the Kew Gardens Hill Library, a key institution in the diverse Queens neighborhood. The renovation and expansion project is filled with natural light and topped with a large green roof. The new 10,000-square-foot Kew Gardens Hill Library is a renovation and 3,000-square-foot expansion of the 1966 Lindsey Library. Custom glass fiber-reinforced concrete panels that clad the facade are molded into a rippled pattern of vertical folds. The curtain-like panels appear to be lifted up on the north corner of the building, where large exterior windows let in ample amounts of natural light and beckon passersby indoors. The concrete is exposed indoors and reflects indirect light from the south- and east-facing clerestory windows . “Not only expressive and functional but also structural, this concrete band acts as a 200-foot-long beam to support the green roof without interrupting the open interior,” write the architects. “Two columns are the only supports for this beam.” Related: This adorable red ‘train’ carts books around the New York Public Library “The new façade is a physical and metaphoric lifting up of the library’s exterior walls in order to broadcast the activities of the library to the outside.” From the glazed corner, the angular facade begins its descent to provide privacy at the staff and book drop areas behind before tilting upwards to form a second, smaller peak at the children’s corner for “child-sized views” to the south. The facade also dips down on the north side for privacy in the teen study area. The library opened to the public on September 6. + Work Architecture Company Images by Bruce Damonte

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Green-roofed Kew Gardens Hill Library lures patrons indoors with a lifted facade

Striking green-roofed house cantilevers over a cliff in Japan

November 30, 2017 by  
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This striking concrete house extends from a cliff above a river in Japan , providing spectacular views of the surrounding landscape. The two-floor green-roofed structure, designed by architecture firm Planet Creations , establishes a delicate balance between rugged and warm materials, with raw wood contrasting against stark concrete walls. The villa is located in Tenkawa village, and it cantilevers over the Tenokawa River, 56 feet below. It’s built into flat bedrock, and the layout is split along the length of the structure. A bedroom, kitchen, and bathroom occupy one side, while the master bedroom, living room and deck area occupy the other. Related: Organic Japanese Shell Residence Wraps Around a Centenarian Fir Tree The steep slope dictated the design of the house and constrained the flatland space to only 64 square feet – enough to accommodate two cars and not much else. In order to ensure structural stability, the architect decided to “submerge the building near the rock so as to melt into this surrounding environment.” + Planet Creations Via Ignant Photos by Masato Sekiya

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Striking green-roofed house cantilevers over a cliff in Japan

Newly discovered property of graphene could lead to infinite clean energy

November 30, 2017 by  
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Physicists at the University of Arkansas have discovered a new property of graphene that could be exploited to generate endless, clean energy . While investigating the simple phenomenon of graphene’s ability to ripple and shake, physicist Paul Thibado and a group of graduate students uncovered a previously unknown behavior in which the wonder material buckles and twists in small, random fluctuations, potentially allowing graphene to be used as an ambient power source. When two electrodes are added on either side of a subtly shaking sheet of graphene, a small shifting voltage is produced, one that can could be magnified for practical use through layering. This new discovery was made over the course of a fairly mundane exploration of graphene’s known tendency to jiggle. It is this random movement of atoms that allows the nearly 2D graphene to function as a 3D material. To study this behavior, students laid sheets of graphene on a copper grid and observed the atomic movement through a scanning tunneling microscope . “The students felt we weren’t going to learn anything useful,” said Thibado , “but I wondered if we were asking too simple a question.” The students then searched for a pattern in graphene’s movement. “Looking at large-scale averages hid the different patterns. Each region of a single image, when viewed over time, produced a more meaningful pattern,” said Thibado. Related: New graphene sieve can remove even small salts from seawater This meaningful pattern of small, random fluctuations that result in dramatic shifts is known as a Lévy flight. Although the phenomenon had been previously observed in biology and climate studies , this marks the first instance in which it was observed on an atomic level. These movements allowed for the production of a small voltage within the graphene. Thibado estimates that a single ten micron by ten micron piece of graphene may produce ten microwatts of power. While this may not seem like much, graphene’s ability to be layered heavily even in a small space could result in a practical electrical charge, one that may be used to power bioimplants. Thibado is working with the US Naval Research Laboratory to further investigate and develop the concept. Via Futurism Images via Depositphotos   (1)

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Newly discovered property of graphene could lead to infinite clean energy

Brilliantly renovated Rusty House is wrapped in a layer of rusted steel

November 21, 2017 by  
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Exposed raw steel wraps around this small house in the Czech Republic , renovated by OK PLAN ARCHITECTS . Covered with a vibrant layer of pre-rusted sheet metal (CorTen), the Rusty House is a minimalist residence that surprises passersby with its unusual exterior and layout maximizes the potential of its tiny plot. After living in the house for twelve years, the owner decided to renovate the interior of the house and “soften” the appearance of the main living space. OK PLAN ARCHITECTS helmed the renovation process which included landscaping  the surrounding garden. Related: Rusty tin shed transformed into beautiful two-story studio in Sydney Exposed concrete, galvanized steel and corrugated sheet metal dominate the house. The architects added layers to the interior, including oak ceiling panels, in order to improve the organization of the interior and its acoustic performance . Custom-made furniture and fixtures were added to bring an element of modernity to the place. Older kitchen cabinets were replaced, and a new fireplace installed in the living room. The architects blended the old and the new to respond to new functional and aesthetic demands, while preserving the rawness of the original structure. + OK PLAN ARCHITECTS Photos by BoysPlayNice Photography

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Brilliantly renovated Rusty House is wrapped in a layer of rusted steel

Beautiful stable grows wild grasses on the roof for horses to eat

September 1, 2017 by  
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Don’t be alarmed if you see horses on the roof of this stable —they’re meant to be there. Argentinian architecture firm Estudio Ramos designed Figueras Stables, a stunning contemporary building for professional polo player Nacho Figueras. Located in the grasslands of La Pampa of central Argentina, the modern stable is planted with wild native grasses on its sloped roof for horses to graze. The Figueras Stables’ low-lying horizontal profile draws inspiration from the simplicity of the surrounding flatlands and the landscape’s “feeling of a never-ending horizontality.” The 3,600-square-meter building comprises two long parallel volumes, one facing the polo field that contains more social spaces and the other near the back of the property that houses work facilities and grooming quarters. There are 44 stalls in total for the polo horses. inhabitat.com/tag/freestanding/ Freestanding walls delineate different outdoor spaces. “A very special and intimate connection is forged between the horses and the people who train and take care of them,” wrote the architects. “It has been our aim to design these stables as the space that contains and nurtures that relationship.” Related: Stocker Dewes Architekten Converts a Horse Stable into a Beautiful Green-Roofed Home The project is built mainly of exposed concrete and local hardwoods, chosen for aesthetic appeal and low maintenance. In contrast to the crisp clean lines of the modern stables and the manicured polo fields, the roof is planted with wild inhabitat.com/tag/native-grasses/ native grasses . The roof is gently sloped and melds into the landscape, creating easy access for the horses and people who want to use it as an observation platform. A concrete spiral staircase also provides access to the roof. Large grass-covered slopes were built to further blend the building into the landscape and provide privacy to the stables. A reflecting pool wraps around part of the building to tie the different spaces together. + Estudio Ramos Via Dezeen

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Beautiful stable grows wild grasses on the roof for horses to eat

Students collaborate with starchitect Daniel Libeskind to design university building

March 28, 2017 by  
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Dramatic interlocking volumes and sharp angles define the new green-roofed Central Building at Leuphana University in Germany. Studio Libeskind designed the project in collaboration with students at the university, where Libeskind works as a part-time professor. The result is a distinct zinc-clad building that will serve as an incubator for new ideas, innovation and research. The 139,930-square-foot building, located on the university’s main campus in the southern part of Lüneburg, integrates a Research Center, a Student Center, spaces for seminars and an auditorium into a single structure. Interlocking volumes facilitate cross-disciplinary interaction and collaborative learning. Related: Daniel Libeskind unveils spectacularly green physics center at Durham University Upon entering the building, visitors are greeted by a swooping triple-height atrium awash in natural light coming through a half dozen skylights . Stairs and bridges puncture the volume and communicate the complexity of the space. The cafeteria and workshops are located on the ground floor, labs and offices occupy the upper floors, and the three-story Seminar Center with a curved roof forms the main entry. Exposed concrete and canted walls are combined with smoked oak parquet throughout the building, and red-painted walls provide way-finding and orientation. Related: Daniel Libeskind unveils design for the new green-roofed Lithuanian Modern Art Center in Vilnius The building will operate at zero emissions thanks to its remarkably efficient design and the use of renewable energy sources. Sustainable design features include a green roof, a grey water system and an innovative Cobiax structural system. + Studio Libeskind + Leuphana University

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Students collaborate with starchitect Daniel Libeskind to design university building

Tokyo’s refurbished 17th century Buddhist temple marries modern and Edo period architecture

March 8, 2016 by  
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Polyhedral Monoclinic House Boasts Eye-Catching Geometric Skylights in Tokyo

January 20, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Polyhedral Monoclinic House Boasts Eye-Catching Geometric Skylights in Tokyo Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: atelier tekuto , Daylighting , exposed concrete , monoclinic , polyhedral house , reinforced concrete , skylights , Tokyo        

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Polyhedral Monoclinic House Boasts Eye-Catching Geometric Skylights in Tokyo

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