Prefab timber home prototype pops up in just 5 days

December 29, 2020 by  
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Modular, transportable and built entirely with locally sourced timber, the prefab Proto-Habitat is an exercise in sustainable living. French design studio Wald.City designed and built the prototype project as part of a one-year research program at the French Academy in Rome – Villa Medici to explore new forms of housing. The 60-square-meter (approximately 645 square feet) abode is scalable and adaptable to a variety of settings and can be used for everything from individual housing to collective buildings. As part of its focus on sustainable design, the Proto-Habitat was constructed with 100% timber materials sourced within 500 kilometers of Bordeaux in southwestern France. Products were carefully chosen from local industries that follow responsible waste management and sustainable forestry practices. The use of wood is celebrated throughout the structure, which features a minimalist and contemporary design. Related: Prefab holiday cabins appear to float among misty tea fields in China Designed with mobility in mind, the base unit of the modular Proto-Habitat can be assembled in just five days by three people and a truck crane. That means there is no need for a foundation. The base module comprises an open-plan ground floor of 30 square meters, a mezzanine of 15 square meters and a 30-square-meter elevated sunroom that is tucked beneath the curved roof. The flexible layout allows the structure to be adapted and expanded to meet a variety of uses and settings. “Shifting the role of the architect to ‘facilitator,’ the prototype and research aim to elaborate new forms and spaces to live together, and alternative financing methods,” the architects explained in a project statement. “This first project tries to develop a possible answer for the contemporary needs of flexibility, close relationships between home and office . It is a prototype to create new social relationships, new forms of commons, and redefining in housing standards what comfort, minimalism, and appropriation could be.” + Wald.City Images via Wald.City

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Prefab timber home prototype pops up in just 5 days

An experimental greenhouse pops up at a busy Copenhagen intersection

October 19, 2018 by  
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A surprising and experimental pocket of nature has popped up in the middle of a heavily trafficked intersection in Copenhagen , Denmark. Danish architect Simon Hjermind Jensen of SHJWorks recently unveiled “Biotope,” a sculptural pavilion that houses a microcosm of plants and insects. Sixty different seeds have been sown into the soil, and a beehive has been attached inside the installation to foster a thriving and evolving ecosystem of activity for the enjoyment of passersby. Created in the likeness of a primitive organism or bacteria, Biotope comprises a translucent shell made from a 4-millimeter-thick polycarbonate membrane that is set in a curved concrete bowl with a rim thick enough to double as bench seating. The installation measures 7 meters in length, 4 meters in width and 3 meters in height at its tallest point. The bowl collects rainwater and directs the water through the small holes in the polycarbonate membrane toward the soil within, thus creating what the designers call a “self-watering greenhouse.” Located near a train station, Biotope will be seen by many pedestrians, cyclists and motorists daily who will have the opportunity to observe the evolution of the greenhouse over its three-year installation period. Neither maintenance activity nor other interference will take place inside the shell during this period; the public will also not be allowed to access the interior. The shell’s site-specific form is optimized for views from the three lane road. Related: This hand-built island is the start of Copenhagen’s “parkipelago” of floating public spaces “Our climate will change,” SHJWorks said. “And maybe we will integrate plants and biological microcosms in our future dwellings and cities. Most likely there will be more harsh and exposed environment on our planet. And we ask ourselves if a solution will be to create microclimates where we — like the bees in this project — have our homes connected to and intertwined with?” + SHJWorks Images via SHJWorks

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An experimental greenhouse pops up at a busy Copenhagen intersection

Computer modeling informed the whimsical design of this experimental home

July 30, 2018 by  
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At first glance, this house in Prague may look like a fanciful and whimsical work of art with little regard for practicality, but a deeper inspection reveals that careful computer modeling and budgeting actually informed its unusual design. Czech architect and co-founder Jan Šépka of the local practice Šépka Architekti designed this organic abode, called the House in the Orchard, as one of his latest experimental residences in the country. Raised on a stalk like a mushroom, the modernist three-story home was crafted in response to the steeply sloped site and comprises a living area of 861 square feet. Designed for one of Šépka’s old friends on the outskirts of Prague, the House in the Orchard is raised on a concrete pillar to mitigate the steep slope and to avoid the high construction cost of a traditional foundation. The three-story dwelling’s asymmetrical shape was conceived through  computer modeling and is split into triangular spaces for stability. To create the home’s concrete-like appearance, the architect layered a gray, waterproof skin atop polyurethane sprayed on top of plywood sheets; the final effect gives the structure its deceptively heavy look. A ramp on the upper part of the slope leads to the entrance and the first floor, which consists of the living area, kitchen and dining room with a wood-burning stove and a large window that frames views of the landscape to the north. Modernist furniture is mixed with custom plywood furnishings designed by Šépka. Related: Sprawling Villa H in Prague adapts to a steep plot with a creative 3-level layout A plywood staircase with open treads and a metal railing leads up to the second floor where the bedrooms and bathroom are located. The study can be found on the top floor. A large skylight in the study draws natural light deep into the home. + Šépka Architekti Via Wallpaper* Images by Tomáš Malý

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Computer modeling informed the whimsical design of this experimental home

Tilting "performance architecture" house spins 360 degrees

August 16, 2016 by  
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ReActor is located at Ghent, New York , just over half an hour south of Albany, at the Omi International Arts Center . The 44-foot by 8-foot house made of concrete and wood rests atop a 15-foot tall column, and can rotate a full 360 degrees. The house moves depending on the movement of the inhabitants, or the wind and weather. Related: Zinc-Clad Leaning House Tilts Upwards to Let in Buckets of Sunlight According to an Omi International Arts Center Facebook post, the artists described their experience of living in the house : “We’re spacemen in the wilderness.” Both artists kept journals aboard ReActor, and described the movements of the tilting house as “graceful and oceanic.” Shelley said, “We almost never stop drifting in circles. It takes only the slightest breeze to set us in motion.” Schweder said, “A view that is always changing, sleep that comes and goes with the sun’s light, and a sense of connectedness with your roommate through knowing what he is doing and feeling mediated by the building – in short, this building is breaking our habits.” For five days, the artists experienced a novel connection to the environment and to each other, as they had to be conscious of where they moved. They enjoyed the gentle movement of the house but also at times felt their movements were constrained, as they continually had to make small adjustments in favor of balance. Schweder and Shelley have worked together since 2007, and ReActor is their first work set outdoors. Though they’ve left the spinning home for now, they’ll return September 24-25 and October 6-10 for further performances. ReActor will grace Omi International Arts Center’s Architecture Omi Field 01 for two years. + Alex Schweder + Ward Shelley + Omi International Arts Center Via The New York Times Images via Omi International Arts Center Facebook

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Tilting "performance architecture" house spins 360 degrees

Leandro Erlich Unveils Gravity-Defying Floating Room in France!

February 28, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Leandro Erlich Unveils Gravity-Defying Floating Room in France! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Argentinian artists , Art , art exhibition , art festival france , art installation France , Art Journey Festival Nantes , avant garde art exhibition , experimental architecture , experimental art , Floating room installation , gravity defying art , Leandro Erlich , nantes

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Leandro Erlich Unveils Gravity-Defying Floating Room in France!

Michael Jantzen Launches Transformable M-Velope Shelters Made from Sustainably Grown Wood

May 2, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Michael Jantzen Launches Transformable M-Velope Shelters Made from Sustainably Grown Wood Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: art installation , experimental architecture , M-House Michael Jantzen , M-Velopes , M-Velopes transformable houses , Michael Jantzen Studio , prefab architecture , prefab wooden panels , sustainably-grown timber , timber art installations , transformable houses , wood houses

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Michael Jantzen Launches Transformable M-Velope Shelters Made from Sustainably Grown Wood

OH.NO.SUMO Is Turning Public Spaces Into Fun Pop-up Cinemas!

June 26, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of OH.NO.SUMO Is Turning Public Spaces Into Fun Pop-up Cinemas! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , experimental architecture , green design , oh.no.sumo. , pop-up spaces , stairway cinema , temporary cinema

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The World is Not Fair: Architects and Artists Unveil 15 Recycled Pavilions at Berlin’s Tempelhof Airport

June 22, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of The World is Not Fair: Architects and Artists Unveil 15 Recycled Pavilions at Berlin’s Tempelhof Airport Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Architecture , Art , berlin , experimental , experimental architecture , green events , HAU theatre , Raumlabor Berlin , re-appropriation , Recycled Materials , tempelhof airport , temporary architecture , The World is Not Fair

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The World is Not Fair: Architects and Artists Unveil 15 Recycled Pavilions at Berlin’s Tempelhof Airport

Bucky Bar Built From Umbrellas is a Pop-Up Party

March 31, 2010 by  
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DUS Architects and the Studio for Unsolicited Architecture offer shelter from the storm with their incredible pop-up Bucky Bar made entirely from umbrellas.

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Bucky Bar Built From Umbrellas is a Pop-Up Party

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