This rechargeable camping headlamp is made out of sustainable wood and recycled aluminum

September 10, 2019 by  
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Most adventurers do what they can to leave no trace when exploring, but sometimes it is nearly impossible to find sustainable hiking gear. In fact, the search for green gear got so frustrating for nature lover Doug Rieck that he invented his own camping headlamp that is made out of sustainable wood and recyclable aluminum. Recently launched on Kickstarter, the Origin Headlamp is not only a sustainable lamp, but it also boasts a powerful 300 lumen LED light that offers at least 10 hours of light and is guaranteed to lead you straight through your epic adventures. Doug Rieck is the founder of Eukarya , an outdoor goods company that designs sustainable gear. Its products are made without chemically engineered plastics and synthetic materials that have been the standard in the outdoor industry. Related: Get ready for an adventure with this ultimate checklist of backpacking essentials Handcrafted from sustainable wood and recycled aluminum, the Origin Headlamp is a durable, reliable light for adventures. With a 300 lumen LED light , the headlamp features a rechargeable battery that guarantees 10+ hours of light. Adding to its convenient features, the battery fully recharges in two hours. Additionally, the headlamp is incredibly useful in distinct settings, because it offers high/low and strobe modes. Of course, nobody wants to be lugging around a heavy light in their camping gear , so it is a good thing that the headlamp only weighs an astonishing 85 grams — substantially less than most standard headlamps. In addition to finally offering nature lovers a variety of green options for their camping and adventure equipment, the company also gives back to the planet. According to the current Kickstarter campaign , Eukarya is promising to plant a tree for each pledge the headlamp receives in collaboration with One Tree Planted . The headlamp has limited availability to early birds for just $99 with a December 2019 delivery or is available for regular pre-order for a March 2020 delivery. + Origin Headlamp Images via Eukarya

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This rechargeable camping headlamp is made out of sustainable wood and recycled aluminum

American trophy hunter may get permit to bring slain rhino home

September 10, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

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An American trophy hunter donates $400,000 to an anti-poaching organization in Namibia in exchange for the privilege of killing an endangered rhinoceros. President Trump may issue the permit for Chris Peyerk to bring his kill home with him, despite the Endangered Species Act specifying that it’s illegal to import endangered animals — whole or in part — unless it will enhance the species’ survival. Peyerk, owner of the Michigan business Dan’s Excavating, Inc., shot one of the last 5,500 rhinos in the world last May. The trophy hunter now plans to import the 29 year-old rhino’s skin, skull and horns as mementos. Related: Trail use by outdoor enthusiasts is driving out an elk herd in Colorado If approved, this would be the sixth such permit the US Fish and Wildlife has allowed since 2013, and Trump’s third. Fish and Wildlife also issued three under former President Barack Obama ’s final term. “Legal, well-regulated hunting as part of a sound management program can benefit the conservation of certain species by providing incentives to local communities to conserve the species and by putting much-needed revenue back into conservation,” said a Fish and Wildlife spokeswoman, according to the Huffington Post. But major conservation groups don’t think that killing animals to save them makes much sense. “We urge our federal government to end this pay-to-slay scheme that delivers critically endangered rhino trophies to wealthy Americans while dealing a devastating blow to rhino conservation,” Kitty Block, president of the Humane Society of the United States , said in a statement. “With fewer than 2,000 black rhinos left in Namibia — and with rhino poaching on the rise — now is the time to ensure that every living black rhino remains safe in the wild. … Black rhinos must be off limits to trophy hunters.” Nearly half of the world’s surviving black rhinos live in Namibia and are listed as critically endangered. Peyerk noted in his permit application that he had killed a member of the southwestern black rhinoceros subspecies, which is listed as “vulnerable” rather than endangered. International law allows Namibia to issue five permits annually for trophy hunters to kill a male rhinoceros. Via Huffington Post Image via Yathin S Krishnappa

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American trophy hunter may get permit to bring slain rhino home

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