Airy Santa Monica Canyon home embraces views of nature and art

May 27, 2020 by  
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Reclaimed materials, a world-class art collection and an indoor/outdoor lifestyle combine in this recently completed Los Angeles residence designed by Santa Monica-based firm  Conner + Perry Architects . Built for  Los Angeles natives, this luxurious four-bedroom family home with large windows and a natural material palette was thoughtfully inserted into a wooded Santa Monica Canyon. Salvaged materials taken from the old existing home on-site and felled wood found on the property have been repurposed into beautiful focal elements for the house, such as the grand entry doors and outdoor furniture.  Designed to embrace the “quintessential California indoor/outdoor experience,” the two-story Santa Monica Canyon home opens up with fully pocketing glass exterior walls to a central courtyard with a pool and outdoor shower. Extended canopy-like cantilevered eaves protect from the sun. The charred wood ( Shou Sugi Ban ) siding, copper, exposed steel and concrete materials that wrap the home’s exterior were selected for their organic nature and their low-maintenance, climate-compatible qualities.  To pay homage to the history of the site, which was used as a Forestry Service test station for Eucalyptus tree testing in the 1910s and 1920s, the architects  salvaged  much of the original 1940s cabin that once occupied the property. Related: New Santa Monica City Services Building will produce more energy than it uses The home interior takes cues from nature and includes a mix of massangis gray  limestone  and French oak used for the floors, weathered brass, blackened steel elements and a variety of marble and tiles. The warm yet restrained palette also provides a neutral backdrop for the clients’ world-class art collection; the interior floor plan was designed to frame views of either the art pieces or landscape views. “Each of them has described the house as having a magical or mystical quality, allowing light in at the right moments, as well as the shadows of the trees , and a calming mirroring effect,” Kristopher Conner, Conner + Perry Architects co-founder, said. + Conner + Perry Architects Images by Taiyo Watanabe

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Airy Santa Monica Canyon home embraces views of nature and art

This Brazilian beach house is made from locally-sourced natural materials

March 13, 2019 by  
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The architects at MNMA Studio have created a natural beachy oasis made of eco-friendly elements in the region of Pontal do Cupe, Pernambuco of northeastern Brazil. Head architects Andre Pepato and Mariana Schmidt used natural materials such as eucalyptus, certified wood, calcium carbonate rocks and even twigs to complement the concrete structure. The people of the Pontal do Cupe region have limited access to building materials and methods, so the beach house helps to symbolize an innovative and rewarding new period of architecture for the area. The building site is located on an old coconut farm, and construction was completely primarily by workers from the surrounding communities. Not only did the architects use environmentally-friendly materials for building, but they also gave the local area an opportunity to learn about sustainable building since some of the project workers (a portion of which came from families of fishermen) had never used cement or concrete before. Related: Minimalist tiny cabin is a secluded retreat in a Brazilian forest It’s clear that the entire project revolved around choosing eco-friendly materials that would reduce the need for environmental energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. For example, a portion of the structure was designed in certified eucalyptus wood. Perhaps one of the most unique and striking portions of the home is the ceiling, which is made from reused twigs and brings a particular brightness into the interior. The furniture and interior decoration are by Sergio Rodrigues and Cariri Fair. The designers used whitewash to add pigment to the concrete, a natural painting process using a non-toxic solution of calcium carbonate rocks, slaked lime and water . The whitewash on the walls and stairs make an eco-friendly statement and fight humidity while adding a textured bright-white color to the open-aired interior and exterior. As a result, the entire beach house is presented with beautiful natural colors. A dark mustard-colored concrete slab serves as a base for the home and contrasts nicely with the light brown wooden columns that help to hold up the roof terrace. The roof patio was fitted with lovely stone slab flooring of faded natural colors and opens up with an unobstructed ocean view. Via Archdaily Images by Andre Klotz 

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This Brazilian beach house is made from locally-sourced natural materials

The off-grid Eucalyptus tiny home radiates cool, Californian vibes

September 26, 2018 by  
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Canada-based  Minimaliste Houses knows a thing or two about building tiny homes that stand up to harsh winters, but even when charged with building a home for the California coast, the designers used many of the same principles to create an energy-efficient and durable structure. The 28 foot-long Eucalyptus tiny home is completely off-grid , relying on roof-top solar panels, tight thermal insulation and natural light to make the home completely self-sustaining. When the builders were approached by a client who wanted a tiny home to live on the California coast, there’s no doubt that they felt it would be an easy project. However, the client also requested a structure that would have a strong resell value years down the line for potential buyers looking to live in a colder climate. This meant that the tiny house had to be durable to withstand various climates for years to come. The result is a gorgeous, custom tiny home that boasts a timeless design for virtually any location. Completely off the grid, the structure generates its own power thanks to a large grid of 260-watt solar panels on the roof. The energy hub of the home is comprised of eight batteries and a 4,000-watt inverter to power the home’s electrical needs, including all of the kitchen appliances. Related: 8 tiny homes built tough for off-grid living In addition to its energy efficiency, the tiny home has a fresh, modern aesthetic. The exterior is clad in white cedar panels, creating a contemporary cabin-like feel that continues through the interior. Inside, ultra high-ceilings add more space for the dual sleeping lofts and create room for people of above-average heigh t. The floors and ceiling are also clad in wood panels that contrast nicely with the all-white walls. The design is open and airy, with an abundance of natural light thanks to various large windows around the home. From the living room, a stairwell with hidden storage leads up to the main bedroom. A unique hand rail made of steel pipes adds an industrial touch to the design. On the other side of the living room is a loft area, which can be used as a reading space or guest room. The bathroom is compact, but there’s enough space for a large stand-up shower, combo washer and dryer and composting toilet . At the heart of the home is the kitchen. Typically an area that is cramped and dark, the Eucalyptus’ kitchen is anything but. The U-shaped kitchen is lined with bamboo countertops that add extra space for the client, who loves to cook. There’s a large sink, propane oven and even a floor-to-ceiling pantry that slides out to provide plenty of storage for culinary staples. + Minimaliste Houses Photography by JP Marquis via Minimaliste

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The off-grid Eucalyptus tiny home radiates cool, Californian vibes

The Collapsible FLIO Laptop Stand Puts a New Angle on Sustainable Workspaces

November 4, 2014 by  
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If you’re one of the millions of people who spend their days typing on a laptop, check out FLIO : it’s a slim, collapsible wooden laptop stand that offers an ergonomic viewing height and keeps an angle for easy typing anywhere you go. It was created by Vlad Butucariu, a young designer living in the Netherlands , and is the thinnest wooden laptop stand to date, measuring less than 10mm in thickness. Made from three thin wooden panels that stack together like a small jigsaw puzzle, FLIO elevates your laptop to keep it cool and responsive, while also keeping your posture straight and your wrists at a healthier , more natural angle while you’re working. Stacked, this stand is only 8mm / 0.31″ thick and so light, that it will be almost unnoticeable while on the go. As an added bonus, it’s made from sustainable, high quality wood , so it’s as ethical as it is sturdy and affordable. To get your own, support FLIO’s newly launched Kickstarter campaign . + FLIO on Kickstarter Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bamboo , bamboo laptop stand , beech laptop stand , Eucalyptus , FLIO , FLIO bamboo , FLIO laptop stand , flio stand , laptop stand , stand , Vlad Butucariu , wood laptop stand , wooden laptop stand

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Salvaged Beauty’s On the Menu at San Fran’s New Kusakabe Sushi Bar

August 1, 2014 by  
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Kusakabe is a new kaiseki -style sushi bar that has elevated sustainable building to a new level of elegance. Designed and constructed by ArcHive designbuild, located in San Francisco’s historic Jackson Square, the 31-seat restaurant has salvaged materials throughout its interior, from the 30-foot slab of solid elm that functions as the bar to the ceiling and walls, made of salvaged eucalyptus and bamboo plywood, respectively. Its interior is tranquil and bright, with the minimalism and clean lines that characterize Japanese design. The restaurant’s sophistication is also reflected in its menu : kaiseki is the Japanese equivalent of  haute cuisine , and utilizes an extensive palette of colors, tastes, flavors, and cooking technique s. + Kusakabe + ArcHive Photos by Patricia Chang ,  Dan Hogman , and ArcHive The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bamboo , elm , Eucalyptus , Kusakabe , repurposed , repurposed wood , Salvaged , salvaged building materials , salvaged material , salvaged materials , salvaged wood , sushi , sushi bar , sushi house , sushi restaurant , upcycled , upcycled materials

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Salvaged Beauty’s On the Menu at San Fran’s New Kusakabe Sushi Bar

Andy Goldsworthy Uses Natural Materials to Make Ephemeral Art Installations at the Presidio in San Francisco

August 19, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Andy Goldsworthy Uses Natural Materials to Make Ephemeral Art Installations at the Presidio in San Francisco Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “natural materials” , Andy Goldsworthy , bay area , California , eco-art , eco-friendly art , Eucalyptus , green art , land art , Monterey cypress , Nature , San Francisco , sculptures , Spire , the Presidio , Wood Line , wood sculptures        

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Andy Goldsworthy Uses Natural Materials to Make Ephemeral Art Installations at the Presidio in San Francisco

Andy Goldsworthy Uses Natural Materials to Make Ephemeral Art Installations at the Presidio in San Francisco

August 19, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Andy Goldsworthy Uses Natural Materials to Make Ephemeral Art Installations at the Presidio in San Francisco Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “natural materials” , Andy Goldsworthy , bay area , California , eco-art , eco-friendly art , Eucalyptus , green art , land art , Monterey cypress , Nature , San Francisco , sculptures , Spire , the Presidio , Wood Line , wood sculptures        

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Andy Goldsworthy Uses Natural Materials to Make Ephemeral Art Installations at the Presidio in San Francisco

Shigeru Ban Completes Incredible Cardboard Cathedral in Christchurch, New Zealand!

August 19, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Shigeru Ban Completes Incredible Cardboard Cathedral in Christchurch, New Zealand! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Cardboard architecture , cardboard cathedral , cathedral made from cardboard , Christchurch , Christchurch cardboard cathedral , church made from cardboard , Disaster Relief , earthquake , eco design , green architecture , green design , Japanese architects , natural disaster , New Zealand , New Zealand cardboard Church , religious building , shigeru ban , sustainable design , temporary design        

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Shigeru Ban Completes Incredible Cardboard Cathedral in Christchurch, New Zealand!

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