Cepezed completes the first self-sufficient bus station in the Netherlands

May 6, 2019 by  
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Delft-based architectural firm cepezed has completed the Netherlands’ first self-sufficient bus station in the southern city of Tilburg. Designed to generate all of its own energy, the new transit facility features a massive solar panel -topped awning that provides shade and gives the bus station its modern and sculptural appearance. The Tilburg bus station was completed as part of the large-scale revitalization of the city’s public transit hub and offers easy access to the neighboring train station and bicycle parking in the railway zone. The new bus station at the west side of the Tilburg train station was designed to prioritize user comfort and safety. To that end, the architects topped the structure with a spacious awning that not only fully covers the bus platforms but also part of the buses, so travelers can be protected from the rain while boarding and deboarding. The steel-framed awning is fitted with lights and covered with ETFE-foil so as to let in filtered sunlight during the day and illuminate the space at night. For inclusivity, the station is equipped with wheelchair-accessible ramps and handrails with braille signing. As a symbol of smart development, the station adopts a contemporary and minimalist design with highly efficient detailing. Built of steel plates and strips, the thin columns that support the large awning also contain water drainage and electric cabling. The S.O.S. button and intercom have also been integrated into one of the columns. In addition to the raised black concrete sitting edges, the architects included backed seating made with strip steel with heating. Related: Architects want to transform an old Dutch bridge into zero-energy apartments Solar panels spanning 2,691 square feet top the awning and power all of the bus station’s needs, from the lighting and digital information signs to the staff canteen and public transport service point. Certain solar-powered lights are triggered by energy-saving motion sensors integrated into the steel edge of the awning. For greater sustainability, the architects ensured the longevity of the structure with a low-maintenance material palette and minimized the edges and corners to reduce costs and resources for cleaning. + cepezed Photography by Lucas van der Wee via cepezed

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Cepezed completes the first self-sufficient bus station in the Netherlands

An auditorium uses translucent ETFE panels for a surreal look

February 14, 2019 by  
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Spanish design firm SelgasCano has completed the surreal Plasencia conference center and auditorium in Spain . Shaped like a giant boulder, the multifaceted building is wrapped in a translucent skin of ETFE panels that floods the interior with natural light during the day and glows like a lantern when illuminated from within at night. In contrast to its pale exterior, the interior is dominated with vibrant colors — from a bright orange entry hall to a deep red auditorium — that heighten the structure’s ethereal feel. Evocative of a futuristic spaceship, SelgasCano’s design of the Plasencia conference center and auditorium was selected in a 2005 competition. However, financing issues severely delayed the project’s completion to 2017. Now in operation, the building spans 7,500 square meters and includes an entrance lobby, a flexible 300-person secondary hall that can be split into three 100-person halls, the exhibition halls and the restaurant area. Set on a steep hillside straddling the border between urban development and the rural landscape, the conference center and auditorium was also designed to sit lightly on the land. Rather than fill in the site, the architects created a cantilevered shape to hover over the rocky terrain. They placed the entrance at the roadway, located 17 meters above the terrain, while inserting ramps and stairs that descend down to the various rooms. Related: SelgasCano’s incredible glass office gives employees a bug’s eye view of the forest floor “The building will be visible in the distance from an entire western perspective, from north to south,” the architects said. “It will be seen when passing by at high speed in a car, which is why we have planned it as a snapshot or a luminous form, acting as a sign for passengers by day and by night, playing at being a correspondence between sensation and reality, between the position it seems to be heading for and the position from where it will move.” + SelgasCano Images by Iwan Baan via SelgasCano

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An auditorium uses translucent ETFE panels for a surreal look

Mining in Tasmania raises water pollution concerns to a new high

February 14, 2019 by  
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Tasmania’s water pollution is becoming a major problem for local residents and wildlife. A new study discovered that metal contamination in the state’s lakes are about as high as they get, raising concerns about the quality of water and food obtained from the region. The majority of the contamination can be traced to historic mining operations in Rosebery and Queenstown. The new study, which was conducted by the Australian National University, looked at six lakes in Tasmania, including Perched Lake, Lake Cygnus, Lake Dobson and Dove Lake, and found levels of arsenic, lead, cadmium and copper. Basin Lake and Owen Tarn had the highest levels of water pollution. The levels of contamination are bad enough to equal some of the highest contaminated waterways in the world, including Iran’s Shur River and Pakistan’s Kurang River. “The levels of contamination are really, really high,” the lead scientist on the study, Larissa Schneider. “They need to do research to know what is happening to the fish and if it’s really high… people should not be eating it.” Schneider compared the level of water pollution to what the United States has encountered in some areas of the country. In those cases, local fish populations were severely harmed by the pollutants, which is a major concern because the contamination levels in Tasmania are much higher. Related: California teen finds golf balls are a major source of plastic waste in our oceans Scientists, for example, discovered an alarming amount of lead contamination in Dove Lake, which could affect native organisms. The new research argues that the contaminates were spread via atmospheric transport. Mining operations in the 1930s used open cut mining, a popular practice until it was outlawed by the Environmental Protection Act in the 1970s. Metal contaminates were discovered over 80 miles away from old mining locations, and some of the lakes are in mountainous regions. This suggests that they reached these bodies of water by passing through the air. Will Hodgman, the premier of Tasmania, discussed the new findings and suggested a form of remediation on the part of government and private industries. The entity that looks after waterways, the Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment , has not commented on Tasmania’s water pollution levels. Via The Guardian Image via Wikipedia Commons  

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Mining in Tasmania raises water pollution concerns to a new high

MVRDV to dramatically revitalize Frances historic Palais du Commerce

February 14, 2019 by  
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Dutch design firm MVRDV has won a competition to renovate and expand the historic Palais du Commerce in Rennes, France. The impressive 19th century palace had once served multiple public functions but now suffers from disconnect with current civic life. Working in collaboration with co-architects Bernard Desmoulin for developers Frey and Engie Avenue, MVRDV plans to reactivate the former public building and transform it into an inviting mixed-use destination that will serve as the centerpiece of the city’s main commercial street. The 18,000-square-meter redevelopment project will include not only a building restoration with a modern 6,000-square-meter timber expansion of the Palais du Commerce, but also the reactivation of the surroundings including the transformation of the Place de la République into a pedestrian-friendly public square as well as the conversion of the Rue du Pré Botté into a landscaped pedestrian area. The landmark building will also be updated with a sensitive approach that will be respectful of its iconic 19th-century design while greatly increasing the building’s transparency. In addition to the replacement of existing windows with larger panes of glass, glazed storefronts will be added to the arches of the arcade and a new grand, winding staircase will anchor the center of the facade. “Not only is Palais du Commerce a local landmark, but its transformation will turn the Place de la République into a popular destination and act as a vital catalyst for its surroundings,” says Nathalie de Vries, founding partner of MVRDV. “Our design approaches this task with an appreciation of the building’s history, but also with an eye towards the future, helping Rennes to achieve its urban vision. The additions that we will make are clearly modern in character, clearly showcasing this design as the latest chapter in the building’s storied history.” Related: MVRDV designs solar-powered “KoolKiel” with Jenga-like architecture in Germany The building’s mixed-use program will include new shops, a hotel, offices, a co-working space, a variety of leisure spaces — including a LEGO museum, event space and an electronic music bar — and a school for the kitchen and hotel industry led by chef Thierry Marx. All spaces of the building will be used more effectively, from the basements to the roof, which will include a new bistro in the building’s central dome. Construction on the project is slated to begin in 2022, with completion expected in 2025. + MVRDV Images via ENGRAM, diagrams via MVRDV

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MVRDV to dramatically revitalize Frances historic Palais du Commerce

Kengo Kuma’s colorful new Sogokagu pavilion glows from within its translucent skin

September 13, 2016 by  
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Located in Mie Prefecture Iga , this two-level building shelters a showroom and production facility for furniture manufacturer  Sogokagu . A flat, rectangular, corrugated steel roof accentuates its curvy design while letting the rain pour down through its sides. Its white plastic skin pays homage to the brand, which specializes in molded urethane (a type of plastic foam). Related: Bubble-shaped stadium controls light and temperature with ETFE air pillows The shelter was crafted by molding large panels of recyclable ETFE plastic ( Ethylene tetrafluoroethylene ), a long-lasting material that is highly resistant to corrosion and heat. Although this material is a common choice for roofing, using it for the walls means that plenty of natural daylight can filter inside. And at night, the light comes from the inside and the whole structure glows – in color. + Kengo Kuma Via Dezeen Photos by Masao Nishikawa

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Kengo Kuma’s colorful new Sogokagu pavilion glows from within its translucent skin

SelgasCano unveils colorful chrysalis-like designs for the 2015 Serpentine Pavilion

March 26, 2015 by  
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Spanish architects Jose Selgas and Lucia Cano of SelgasCano just unveiled designs for the 2015 Serpentine Pavilion, a temporary summer structure to be built in London’s Kensington Gardens. Commissioned by the Serpentine Galleries , SelgasCano’s colorful chrysalis-like design is characteristic of their other playful nature-inspired works. The bold structure will be made from layers of plastic fabric and multicolored webbing to create the effect of a kaleidoscope of stained glass from the inside. Read the rest of SelgasCano unveils colorful chrysalis-like designs for the 2015 Serpentine Pavilion Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: ETFE , kensington gardens , labyrinth , London , maze , multicolored pavilion , pavilion , plastic fabric , Selgascano , Serpentine Galleries , Serpentine Pavilion , webbing

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SelgasCano unveils colorful chrysalis-like designs for the 2015 Serpentine Pavilion

HOK’s new ARCTIC Center paves the way for California’s high speed rail

December 15, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of HOK’s new ARCTIC Center paves the way for California’s high speed rail Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Anaheim transportation , ARTIC transit hub , california high speed rail , California rail , ETFE , green infrastructure , high speed rail , HOK architects , natural ventilation , reduced solar heat gain , southern california , transit hub , transportation hub , vaulted structure

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HOK’s new ARCTIC Center paves the way for California’s high speed rail

Norman Foster’s Grand Canary Wharf Crossrail Station in London is Almost Finished

July 18, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Norman Foster’s Grand Canary Wharf Crossrail Station in London is Almost Finished Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Canary Wharf , Crossrail Station , ETFE plastic , Foster + Partners , latticed structure , London , train station

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Norman Foster’s Grand Canary Wharf Crossrail Station in London is Almost Finished

Rowan Tindale’s Beautiful Wood Sustrans Bike is Made Entirely from Waste Materials

July 17, 2014 by  
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Designer Rowan Tindale teamed up with sustainable transport charity Sustrans to make a bike that is as sustainable to produce as it is to use. The frame is made of wood salvaged from Brighton’s sea defenses, and it has been laminated using a bio-epoxy resin. The back fork is made of wood salvaged from a tree affected by ash dieback that was steam bent to accommodate the rear wheel. The rest of the parts have all been salvaged from broken bikes to produce a bike made entirely from waste or recycled material. + Sustrans Bike The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bicycle , bike , green design , green transportation , reclaimed wood , recycled bike , Rowan Tindale , sustainable design , sustrans , sustrans bike , wood bike , wooden bicycle

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Rowan Tindale’s Beautiful Wood Sustrans Bike is Made Entirely from Waste Materials

Fascinating New Greenhouse at Aarhus Botanical Garden Changes Transparency at Different Pressures

January 13, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Fascinating New Greenhouse at Aarhus Botanical Garden Changes Transparency at Different Pressures Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: botanical garden design , C. F. Møller Architekten , danish architecture , energy-efficient botanical garden Denmark , energy-efficient greenhouse , ETFE cushions , ETFE dome Aarhus , formTL engineers , green architecture , greenhouses        

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Fascinating New Greenhouse at Aarhus Botanical Garden Changes Transparency at Different Pressures

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