First-of-its-kind university building in Spain achieves LEED Platinum certification

September 15, 2016 by  
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The first building faces Madrid Street and is connected to an existing building via several walkways and a big foyer linking the new park with the rest of the campus. Concrete pillars are distributed along a grid reflected on the ventilated ceramic facade of the building, with large spans solved using post-tensioned slabs. Related: Green-Roofed University Building in Japan Serves Double Duty The facade was designed as a uniform surface clad with ceramic panels and windows scattered throughout to break up the monotony of the rhythm. The building combines two innovative concepts-a flexible approach to designing educational spaces and a growing commitment to environmental sustainability. + Estudio Beldarrain Via World Architecture News Photos by Francisco Berreteaga

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First-of-its-kind university building in Spain achieves LEED Platinum certification

Spanish architects reuse railway sleepers to build a sculptural library extension

November 25, 2015 by  
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Spanish architects reuse railway sleepers to build a sculptural library extension

Africa’s fastest solar power project was built in one year

November 25, 2015 by  
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Rwanda, perhaps best known as a once war-torn nation in the middle of Africa, has garnered the attention of clean energy advocates around the globe for constructing the fastest solar power project on the continent . The solar farm, situated in the famous green hills 37 miles east of the capital, Kigali, has a capacity of 8.5 megawatts (MW), That’s enough energy to power nearly 1,400 homes in the United States. For a rural nation like Rwanda, the same amount of energy has a much broader impact. But it’s not the size of the project that has wowed critics as much as the speed. The entire $24 million solar field went from contracts to connection in just one year. Read the rest of Africa’s fastest solar power project was built in one year

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Africa’s fastest solar power project was built in one year

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