Episode 121: Mega deals in clean energy, P&G’s circular geometry, Walmart’s EV charging crusade

April 20, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

In this episode, we also contemplate the art of reducing the environmental of popular music festivals, like the massive event concluding this weekend in the Coachella Valley desert.

More:
Episode 121: Mega deals in clean energy, P&G’s circular geometry, Walmart’s EV charging crusade

Can urban farming help solve the growing food scarcity crisis

April 20, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Former basketball player Will Allen talks about his mission to transform local food systems.

Original post:
Can urban farming help solve the growing food scarcity crisis

The great democratization of transportation

April 17, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Open data is revolutionizing how innovators and cities manage the environmental and social effects of urban transit.

View original here:
The great democratization of transportation

Apple says they’re "globally powered by 100% renewable energy"

April 10, 2018 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Apple says they’re "globally powered by 100% renewable energy"

Silicon Valley’s big tech companies are hopping on the clean power bandwagon — last week, Google announced they’d purchased enough renewable energy to match the electricity they consumed in 2017, and now Apple’s making an announcement of their own: their global facilities “are powered with 100 percent clean energy .” Apple’s offices, data centers, and retail stores are all 100 percent powered by renewables, according to the company. They also said nine of their manufacturing partners committed to power their Apple production entirely with clean energy, bringing the tally of supplier commitments up to 23. Related: Google hits its incredible 100% renewable energy goal The Verge pointed out this doesn’t mean every electron or joule originally stems from wind , solar , or other clean energy plants. Some global operations are located in areas that lack access to renewables. Apple purchases enough clean energy to offset their power consumption. They buy Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs), which the Environmental Protection Agency defines as “a market-based instrument that represents the property rights to the environmental, social, and other non-power attributes of renewable electricity generation. RECs are issued when one megawatt-hour (MWh) of electricity is generated and delivered to the electricity grid from a renewable energy resource.” Apple said they work together with partners to construct renewable energy projects — and they have 25 operational projects worldwide with 626 megawatts (MW) in generation capacity. 15 projects are in the works, and when they’re finished, Apple can boast 1.4 gigawatts of renewable energy generation in 11 countries. Apple Park , the company’s Cupertino, California headquarters, is 100 percent powered by clean energy, according to the company, including 17 MW in rooftop solar . Apple CEO Tim Cook said in the company’s statement, “We’re committed to leaving the world better than we found it…We’re going to keep pushing the boundaries of what is possible with the materials in our products, the way we recycle them, our facilities and our work with suppliers to establish new creative and forward-looking sources of renewable energy because we know the future depends on it.” + Apple Via The Verge Images via Apple

Here is the original post: 
Apple says they’re "globally powered by 100% renewable energy"

Cambridge Analytica, Facebook and the climate change angle

March 26, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Cambridge Analytica, Facebook and the climate change angle

Is the scandalous corruption of our political campaigns also undermining our response to the environmental crisis?

See the original post here:
Cambridge Analytica, Facebook and the climate change angle

Synthetic Pollenizer uses 3D-printed robotic flowers to help save bees

March 2, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Synthetic Pollenizer uses 3D-printed robotic flowers to help save bees

Over the last 20 years we’ve seen a dramatic decline in bee populations as a result of harmful pesticides and other environmental challenges . So, Brisbane’s Michael Candy proposed a unique solution. The artist’s Synthetic Pollenizer project combines artificial pollination with 3D printing to provide a safe space for bees to continue their important work as pollinators, without some of the inherent risks. The Synthetic Pollenizer is a conceptual project that uses a system of robotic flowers safe for bees to pollinate compared to real plants (potentially contaminated with pesticides). The robotic petals can stand alongside real plants and feature pollen, nectar and a synthetic stamen. “It has taken several years to successfully coax bees into landing on the synthetic pollenisers,” said Candy. “The color and form of the unit are important for attraction as bees have a variety of ways to identify flowers.” Related: Over 700 North American bee species are heading towards extinction The flowers are connected to a network for motor and tubes which push a man-made nectar solution to the petal surface. A pollen trap fits over the hive entrance and collects leftover pollen pellets from the bees’ hind legs which Candy then feeds into the synthetic stamen. Bees pick up the pollen the same way they do from a real flower. “Perhaps in a future where designer crops are no longer able to produce pollen yet still receive it, Candy said, “then the Synthetic Pollenizer could rehabilitate the reproductive cycle of these genetically modified crops”. + Michael Candy Via Dezeen

See original here: 
Synthetic Pollenizer uses 3D-printed robotic flowers to help save bees

The Inconvenient Youth: Pestering others on pro-social behavior

January 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on The Inconvenient Youth: Pestering others on pro-social behavior

Two researchers set out to learn how, and how much, young people can influence others to change their environmental behaviors.

Read the original here:
The Inconvenient Youth: Pestering others on pro-social behavior

Colorado hits lowest renewables and storage bids to date

January 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Colorado hits lowest renewables and storage bids to date

The state will deliver reliable renewables plus storage projects at a price that is cheaper than operational coal capacity.

Here is the original:
Colorado hits lowest renewables and storage bids to date

How to influence government and avoid the ‘tragedy of the commons’

September 26, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on How to influence government and avoid the ‘tragedy of the commons’

The world and everyone on it are headed towards a “flash point,” said Luis Salaveria, director of Hawaii’s department of business, economic development and tourism, at VERGE Hawaii 2017. That includes communities, businesses and governments that have both benefited from modern advancements in agriculture, medicine and science and contributed to the environmental crises facing the planet. 

Read more here:
How to influence government and avoid the ‘tragedy of the commons’

Startup is developing kelp farms in the open ocean to make carbon-neutral biofuel

September 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Startup is developing kelp farms in the open ocean to make carbon-neutral biofuel

Could a robotic kelp farm offer an alternative fuel for cars or jets? The founders behind Marine BioEnergy hope so. The startup will soon begin testing a prototype of their kelp elevator, a farm that can move up and down in the water with the help of drones to optimize access to sunlight and nutrients, near Catalina Island in California . They think biofuel made from the kelp could be cost-competitive with fossil fuels . Marine BioEnergy’s new kelp elevator grows seaweed on a long tube, and if tests go well, they hope to start farming in the open ocean between Hawaii and California. They’re working with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory , which has developed a way to transform kelp into biocrude. The kelp fuel should be carbon neutral since kelp absorbs around the same amount of carbon dioxide as would be emitted when the fuel is burned. Related: Breakthrough algae strain produces twice as much biofuel In 2015, the United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy (ARPA-E) gave a grant to Marine BioEnergy, which was started by wife and husband team Cindy and and Brian Wilcox, who works a day job in space robotics at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Marine BioEnergy has also been working with the University of Southern California’s Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies on a proof-of-concept study. Kelp could provide a better biofuel: it has little cellulose or lignin, fibers that are hard to process. Grown in the ocean, kelp also wouldn’t require pesticides or irrigation as plants on land might. In optimal conditions, it can grow over a foot a day. And the kelp elevator could help the seaweed reach those conditions, even in the open ocean. Kelp grows best in shallow coastal waters, where it can anchor to the ocean floor and receive sunlight. But to scale up kelp production, Marine BioEnergy would need the space of the open ocean. Their robotic elevator could help kelp receive the sunlight, from near the ocean’s surface, and nutrients, from deeper waters, to thrive. Drones could also keep the kelp elevator avoid storms and stay out of the way of ships, and when the seaweed is ready, tow it to a ship. The team is trying to determine whether it might be more economical to make the biocrude right on the ship since a processing center could fit on a container ship powered by the fuel. + Marine BioEnergy Via Fast Company Images via USC Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies Facebook

More here: 
Startup is developing kelp farms in the open ocean to make carbon-neutral biofuel

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 614 access attempts in the last 7 days.