How To Be a Good Environmental Steward When You Travel

February 10, 2021 by  
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The pandemic means added safety precautions at home and when … The post How To Be a Good Environmental Steward When You Travel appeared first on Earth 911.

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Pianca redesigns Calatea Green chair for the circular economy

February 3, 2021 by  
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To celebrate the inauguration of Green Pea, Italy’s first dedicated green retail park, Cristina Celestina of Pianca recently presented Calatea Green, a chair that follows a circular economy model. The piece is a redesign of the company’s Calatea chair, originally developed in 2017, with new, eco-friendly materials and organic aesthetics for a greener version of the classic chair. According to Pianca, the designer reinvented each element of the Calatea design after reconsidering the environmental impacts of the piece. The chair’s padding is now made of recycled PET fabric, sourced from water bottles, that is both recyclable and compostable. The legs are made of FSC-certified ash wood sourced from responsibly managed forests with controlled logging. On the outside, the upholstery fabric is made of open-end cotton yarn that comes from 100% recycled material certified according to the Global Recycled Standard. Related: Serif + Sero modular furniture is made of 100% upcycled cardboard A play on the tropical “Calathea” plants that are distinguishable by their multiple colors of green and wispy natural pattern, the new Calatea Green chairs have a decorated design that is hand-painted with non-toxic , water-based ink. This decoration is a tribute to Celestino’s home in Friuli Venezia Giulia, an Italian region bordered by the Julian Alps mountain range, and the native alder tree that thrives there. The chair itself is also a reflection of Pianca’s eco-friendly model, which includes a long-standing tradition of using raw wood from sustainably certified forests. The company also uses 90% recycled packaging and relies on a photovoltaic system that meets the total energy demand of production. The Green Pea park is located in northern Italy and is dedicated to selling eco-friendly products from more than 100 companies committed to sustainable practices. With five floors and 15,000 square meters of space, the park will also house a 150-square-meter Pianca showroom to display furniture designed and built with the environment in mind. + Pianca Photography by Andrea Martiradonna and Jasmina Martiradonna via Pianca

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Tasmanian island to be powered by wave energy

February 3, 2021 by  
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In about one month’s time, a remote Tasmanian island will be powered by wave energy. If the test project is successful, King Island residents will enjoy renewable energy harnessed from wave swells. This will make the island one of the few places on Earth where three forms of clean energy are used. Currently, about two-thirds of the island’s energy needs are covered by wind and solar power. The island of 1,700 people is being used as an example of how renewable energy can be adopted in the modern world. The project has been backed by federal agents and other investors, and it is led by Wave Swell Energy, a progressive energy company based in Australia . Tom Denniss, the co-founder of Wave Swell Energy, explained how the wave energy harnessing system works. Related: First-of-its-kind device prototype harnesses renewable energy from ocean waves “It’s very much like an artificial blowhole,” Denniss said. “There’s a big underwater chamber that’s open out the front, so the water is forced into the chamber. It pushes that air back and forth. The movement of air that spins the turbine and produces electricity.” Studies have shown that Australia’s southern coast has the potential to generate huge amounts of wave energy . A study carried out by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) found that the huge swells of waves on the coast can generate commercially viable power. Research showed that if wave energy is well-harnessed in Australia, it could cover up to 11% of the country’s energy needs by mid-century. “Clearly there’s a massive wave resource . It’s definitely a resource worth pursuing,” Denniss said. “We’ll have something soon but it’ll still be relatively small. It’s the future we’re looking towards.” The project uses a boat-like structure that floats on water . The structure is expected to harness about 200kW of power, but Wave Swell Energy has plans for a bigger model. “This is just a demonstration of the technology at this stage,” Denniss explained. “The aim of the project is to get a good estimate and generate data on how much it produces in different-sized waves. We want to see all different-sized waves so that we know across the full range of conditions what the unit can produce.” + Wave Swell Energy Via The Guardian Image via Hans B.

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Moving beyond 100% recyclable goals

January 28, 2021 by  
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Moving beyond 100% recyclable goals Scott Breen Thu, 01/28/2021 – 01:15 Numerous companies have set 100 percent recyclable, reusable or compostable packaging goals such as Colgate-Palmolive and Kellogg. Virtually all these companies, though, are not tracking whether their packaging is actually recycled and what new products their packaging becomes. Without this end-of-life tracking, they cannot determine the extent of the economic and environmental impact from how their packaging was recycled. Technical recyclability is only the first step of many questions to determine if your packaging works in today’s recycling system. Other questions include: Is the packaging collected in the vast majority of recycling programs? Can the packaging be easily separated from the rest of the single stream recyclables? Once baled with like materials, does the material the packaging was made of sell for an amount that pays for the cost to collect and separate it and, ideally, provide additional needed revenue to the material recovery facilities (MRF) that separate single stream recyclables? Is the packaging downcycled into a product unlikely to be recycled at its end-of-life?  These questions are harder to answer. Further, some companies may not want to look under the recycling hood. They might fear uncovering negative characteristics for a packaging type that they want to continue using because they’ve invested in it, it provides higher margins than other packaging, or consumers find it attractive. If companies are serious about fixing the U.S. recycling system, they need to go beyond a new willingness to fee-setting and long-term recyclability goals . They need to consider what inputs they are pumping into the recycling system. Material flows One way to answer some of the above questions is to use material flow analyses (MFA). MFAs show visually how materials flow through the waste management system. They make it easier to identify where material is being lost and whether there is downcycling or ” real recycling .” While the whopping 82% of plastic going to landfill is jarring, it is important to look at the end-products that this MFA identifies and what percent actually gets recycled once entering the recycling system. Metabolic’s ” Recycling Unpacked: Assessing the Circular Potential of Beverage Containers in the U.S. ” has a beverage container MFA. One can see that a third of PET is lost during the mechanical recycling process and 40 percent of the glass material collected from single-stream recycling systems is used as landfill cover. The MFA also shows the best performer. It is aluminum cans with 82 percent of used beverage cans entering the U.S. recycling system able to be recovered for high-quality closed-loop recycling into another can, which easily can be recycled at the end of its useful life. Closed Loop Partners (CLP) also has conducted a detailed MFA for a variety of plastic resins. While the whopping 82 percent of plastic going to landfill is jarring, it is important to look at the end-products that this MFA identifies and what percent actually gets recycled once entering the recycling system. End uses vary by resin. One of the top end-uses noted in the MFA is synthetic fiber, which typically is used for clothing. Most new clothing , regardless of if it is made with recycled material, will go to landfill unless nascent solutions are scaled. One extra revolution is far from true circularity. Also consider plastic polyethylene (PE) film in CLP’s MFA. The only PE film that is recycled is the small percent that goes to retail store drop-off and commercial direct bales. So, PE film is technically recyclable . Thus, some companies may count it towards their 100 percent recyclable goal, but it is far from being truly recycled in today’s system. It may be difficult for a company to do an MFA of just its products. Still, companies should look to MFAs of material types and packaging generally to get a sense of if there is ” real recycling ” with their packaging. Revenue source or cost for recyclers The more than 350 residential MRFs in the U.S. are struggling with incessant contamination and often pay more to separate recyclables than they earn selling them.  Companies should consider whether the packaging they put into the marketplace will help recyclers on the back end with added revenue. The consistent, relatively high revenue sources for MRFs are certain kinds of paper ( cardboard ), aluminum beverage cans and certain kinds of plastic ( HDPE ). In fact, one recent study by Gershman, Brickner & Bratton determined that without the revenue from used beverage cans, most MRFs wouldn’t be able to operate . Typically low or even negative value materials for MRFs include glass , mixed paper and cartons .  They also should consider if the material is easy to separate and bale to sell for the needed revenue. For example, steel cans are easy to remove from the rest of the single stream recyclables via a magnet . Artificial Intelligence , robotics and optical scanners help address materials being missorted . Nonetheless, many MRFs do not have this kind of technology, nor the capital to purchase it . Environmental impact of recycling In addition to the economic impact of recycling, companies should consider the environmental impact that comes with how their packaging is recycled. The amount of energy saved from making a product with recycled material versus virgin material differs. With plastic and glass, it’s about a third . In contrast, aluminum cans and steel cans save 90 percent and 75 percent , respectively. A company making sure all its packaging is technically recyclable does little to address this problem of too much packaging that the U.S. recycling system cannot process economically and efficiently. Recycled content goals are certainly a step in the right direction toward building up domestic recycling markets and achieving the above environmental impact with greater displacement of virgin material. However, companies still should consider whether the materials in their packaging can loop numerous times. Plastic can be recycled only two or three times . Alternatively, glass and metal can recycle many more times as there is no loss in quality when they are recycled. When multiple loops from the same piece of material are considered , the environmental and economic impacts stack up . Packaging choice is critical to recycling system health The key to a thriving recycling system is either investing in the technology and infrastructure necessary such that all recyclable materials can be economically and efficiently recycled at scale or having more consumer goods companies choose packaging that recycles economically and efficiently in the current system. Neither is happening right now. Too much packaging dumped into the marketplace does not work in today’s recycling system. It’s worthless, multi-material, hard to separate and/or not easy to recycle into anything useful/recyclable. No wonder there are now calls for the chasing arrows symbol to be taken off all plastic packaging, and Greenpeace is suing Walmart for misleading recyclability labels on its plastic products and packaging. A company making sure all its packaging is technically recyclable does little to address this problem of too much packaging that the U.S. recycling system cannot process economically and efficiently. Companies need to go beyond technically “recyclable” in the sustainability metrics they use to choose their packaging . Potential alternative metrics include some percent of all the company’s packaging is above a certain value per ton, some percent of all the company’s packaging is primarily made of material that does not degrade during the recycling process and some percent of all the company’s packaging is primarily recycled into the same kind of packaging or other useful, easy to recycle products. There’s an opportunity for a company to be the first mover in next level recycling metrics and packaging choice. Once many companies make the shift, the recycling system will thrive and the economic and environmental impact from recycling will multiply. Pull Quote While the whopping 82% of plastic going to landfill is jarring, it is important to look at the end-products that this MFA identifies and what percent actually gets recycled once entering the recycling system. A company making sure all its packaging is technically recyclable does little to address this problem of too much packaging that the U.S. recycling system cannot process economically and efficiently. Topics Design & Packaging Circular Economy Recycling Packaging Circular Packaging Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Photo by Nick Fewings on Unsplash .

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Want to switch to reusable cups? Here’s how to get started 

January 18, 2021 by  
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Want to switch to reusable cups? Here’s how to get started  Lauren Phipps Mon, 01/18/2021 – 00:15 By now, you know the problem: Nearly 250 billion single-use cups are used globally every year — most of which end up in a landfill — and the environmental, economic and social costs are mounting. And that’s just cups. You also know the solution: In addition to recyclable and compostable alternatives, reuse models are quickly emerging as a fundamentally better alternative to single-use ones, not to mention that converting 20 percent of the world’s disposable plastic packaging into reusables is a $10 billion opportunity.  So…now what?  If only this were just a matter of procurement. Far more complex are the systems surrounding cups and other disposables: platform design; customer adoption; retail implementation; collection; sanitation; end-of-life management; and, of course, selecting the right cup itself. That’s before you get to sustainable materials and production methods. Thanks to a new report by Closed Loop Partners, the path from conception to pilot and scale for a reusable and refillable packaging model — in this case the cup — has been spelled out to help you get started. It’s not a blueprint per se, but rather a collection of insights and learnings from the NextGen Consortium’s initial pilots with Starbucks and McDonald’s, done in collaboration with the design firm IDEO.  Here are some key takeaways to keep in mind when designing a new reuse system:  Design: Convenience, integration into existing systems and environmental impact must be aligned from the start, at the design phase. Consider the cup’s journey from sign-up and point of sale, to use at retail, customer handoff, point of return, washing and sanitizing, pickup and delivery. In-store inventory management (display and stackability of bulkier cups, storage, accessibility) — all will need to be designed into the system. Environmental impact is based on materials sourcing and manufacturing, the number of uses before a cup is decommissioned, and its end-of-life plan, so each element must be considered.  Collaboration: Engage baristas, staff and other key stakeholders who don’t often play a role in corporate decision-making processes. The employee buy-in and ease of integration into existing cafe workflows can make or break the success of a system. Determining the appropriate logistics partners also will be crucial at every step of a cup’s existence. Be sure to engage with local policymakers as well to ensure your program’s adherence to health and safety codes, and to help shape future policy to enable reuse models.  Implementation: Systems will need to be flexible to adapt to unique cafe environments, market needs and cultural considerations. Incentives and fee structures will need to adapt to the particular policy environment in which a cafe sits, which will likely change over time.  Adoption: When considering the overall cost of new systems, account for an investment in education, storytelling and customer acquisition. This will take time. Consider the motivations of customers and design the system accordingly, all while ensuring a seamless customer experience. Evaluate and adjust along the way.  “We are on the cusp of a reuse revolution,” says Bridget Croke, managing director of Closed Loop Partners, in the report. “Reuse will be a growing part of the plastic solution portfolio used by brands and retailers. It’s certainly not going to solve the whole plastic waste challenge, but as more of these models come to market, we are excited to see new solutions that collectively build reuse back into our cultural and behavioral norms.” Sure, many headlines about reuse are still in pilot phase, but brands and retailers have to start somewhere. On top of designing a workable system — one that considers consumer demand and readiness, cultural differences and financial barriers — it’s important to remember that the humble cup is a primary touchpoint for brand engagement. For most consumers that don’t (yet) bring their own cup to a Starbucks, for example, a change to the design and user experience could have negative visceral, emotional and Instagrammable implications.  Pilots are a great place to begin, so long as they are just the start.  Topics Circular Economy Circular Packaging Featured Column In the Loop Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Six of the cups tested as part of the NextGen Cup Challenge. Image courtesy of NextGen Consortium

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Adidas Outdoor line furthers brand’s push for sustainability

January 14, 2021 by  
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While many big businesses and brands cause overwhelming environmental problems, Adidas works to clean up its act. In a bold move last January, Adidas acknowledged its contribution to plastic waste, noting the waste’s negative impacts on the world’s oceans. The brand followed up this acknowledgment with plans to move forward with the environment in mind. Adidas’s new Outdoor line stays true to this environmental commitment with clear sustainable features. The Outdoor line includes shirts, pants, jackets, shoes and, of course, face masks. You can wear head to toe Adidas while still dressing sustainably. Adidas accomplishes this by using recycled materials and PRIMEGREEN technology. The company describes PRIMEGREEN as a “performance fabric” containing absolutely no virgin plastic. This fabric looks and feels good, all while helping Adidas work toward its goal to end plastic waste. But if the fabric contains no virgin plastic, what exactly is it made of? Hitting on the third R in the “reduce, reuse, recycle” trifecta, PRIMEGREEN contains 100% recycled polyester. Related: Adidas unveils lightweight hiking shoe made from ocean plastic Several products in the Outdoor line use these sustainable materials, but one that stands out is the MyShelter Parley RAIN.RDY Jacket. Using 100% recycled polyester and Parley Ocean Plastic made from recycled marine plastic waste, the MyShelter Parley RAIN.RDY Jacket exemplifies Adidas’s efforts to reduce plastic waste. You can grab this eco-friendly jacket along with vests, parkas and insulated hooded jackets in both men’s and women’s styles on Adidas’s  website . This line serves as just part of Adidas’s sustainability work. While the use of recycled polyester demonstrates Adidas’s work toward its commitment to shift to recycled polyester in all products by 2024, the brand has additional environmental goals in sight. As stated in an  article  from January 2020, Adidas plans to reduce its carbon footprint by 30% by 2030 and be climate neutral by 2050. An influential brand like Adidas making such strong strides toward sustainability encourages competitors to adopt green initiatives, too. Hopefully, this green trend can make a real impact on the world’s plastic waste problem. + Adidas Images via Adidas

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Organic and conventional meat production cause equal amounts of emissions

December 24, 2020 by  
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Research published in the journal Nature Communications  has revealed that the environmental impact caused by organically farmed meat is equal to that caused by conventionally farmed meat. The research was carried out to determine the exact cost of foods if their climate costs were accounted for. According to the researchers, the analyzed data should be used to set food prices and taxes that reflect the true costs of food. The research shows that the emissions caused by organically produced meat is similar to those from conventionally farmed meat. This is especially true for cattle and sheep. The researchers found the climate-related damage of raising organic chicken to be slightly worse than raising conventional chicken. On the other hand, organic pork was found to be slightly better in terms of emissions as compared to conventional pork. Related: Will gene editing and cloning create super cows that resist global warming? The research further revealed that if all climate-related costs were considered per food item produced, there would be a 40% increase in shop prices for conventional meat. At the same time, there would be a 25% increase in organic meat . This is not because organic meat causes less pollution but because it is already more expensive than conventional meat. The prices of conventional milk would rise by about 33% while that of organic milk would increase by at least 20%. The study, led by Maximilian Pieper of the Technical University of Munich, analyzed German food production alone. But researchers say that the results would likely be replicated in many other European countries. “We expected organic farming to score better for animal-based products but, for greenhouse gas emissions, it actually doesn’t make much difference,” Pieper said. “But in certain other aspects, organic is certainly better than conventional farming.” Meat produced either organically or conventionally pollutes the environment in many ways. Overuse of chemical fertilizers, pesticides and mishandling of manure are some of the ways in which food production is problematic. Meat consumption can also lead to health complications. Research carried out in 2018 revealed that a  20% tax increase  on red meat would be necessary to cover its associated health effects. + Nature Communications Via The Guardian Image via Pen Ash

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Tallhouse: an adaptable, timber model for low-carbon urban housing

December 10, 2020 by  
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In an effort to bring down carbon emissions and streamline the building of cost-effective urban housing , Boston-based AEC technology company Generate is focused on revolutionizing the city’s construction industry. Generate has created The Tallhouse, a template for adaptable, low-carbon housing that prioritizes the structural use of mass timber. It’s no secret that buildings account for a massive portion of greenhouse gas emissions through embodied and operational energy. That, paired with rapid population growth and urban densification, presents a problem for future sustainability goals for Boston . The city is experiencing pressure from housing shortages and carbon-output, which has inspired goals of building 300,000 housing units and 40,0000,000 square feet of commercial buildings while reducing the city’s carbon footprint by 80% in 2050. If the status quo of carbon-emitting structures is maintained at its current level, according to the company, these goals will remain unattainable. Related: World’s tallest hybrid timber building proposed for Sydney For these reasons, Generate has assembled a group of industry leaders to develop The Tallhouse, which will comprise a catalog of four mass timber structure templates that illustrate a range of design options that are quick, sustainable, cost-effective and high-quality. The team identified carbon emission savings from building materials and construction, displaying information on each building component to help increase transparency on the environmental implications of construction. “Already, we are designing individual mass timber projects relying on these digital systems, which are now starting to go up in Boston,” said John Klein, CEO of Generate. “But the Tallhouse catalog was developed with the specific intent of at once enabling our cities to achieve their ambitious CO2 footprint reduction goals, and to meet growing demand for affordable, biophilic housing. We trust these systems will be widely accessible to architectural communities globally, and serve as a vehicle to deploy sustainable materials at scale.” The Tallhouse catalog is meant to inspire sustainable systems but also aid policy makers in decisions regarding eco-friendly building materials. The building templates include a hybrid steel and cross-laminated timber structure; a mass timber post, beam and plate structure; a hybrid light-gauge metal and cross-laminated timber structure; and a full and cross-laminated timber plate honeycomb structure. Systems are designed for anywhere from eight- to 18-story buildings. In addition to the sustainable framework, the structures include low-flow water fixtures, LED lighting and large windows to let in daylight. + Generate Images via Generate

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WSLA, GreenBiz team on Women in Sustainability Leadership Awards

December 9, 2020 by  
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WSLA, GreenBiz team on Women in Sustainability Leadership Awards Heather Clancy Wed, 12/09/2020 – 00:00 I’m excited to share that GreenBiz Group is teaming up with the newly formed WSLA Alumnae Group, which acquired the Women in Sustainability Leadership Awards (WSLA) from gb&d magazine in August. We’ll be acting as the organization’s media partner to build awareness for the next edition of its awards program. Composed of previous WSLA award recipients (there are 87 honorees), the alumnae group’s membership includes the most dedicated sustainability professionals in the field who have made significant positive changes to the planet, demonstrating bravery in the workplace and mentoring the next group of female leaders. The group’s summits, service activities and mentorship opportunities are paving the way in sustainability and for future leaders in the field. As media partner, GreenBiz will develop and execute an editorial and communications plan to increase awareness and traction for the WSLA Alumnae Group and the virtual awards program, taking place in April. The call for entries will be announced in January, with GreenBiz participating in the judging and selection of the 2021 winners. I’m honored to say that I’ll be personally serving on the WSLA Alumnae Group board of directors. The organization’s mission aligns well with GreenBiz’s values of championing corporate climate action that is informed by diverse communities and recognizes the intersection between climate change and racial justice. As more businesses embrace the “social” issues associated with environmental, social and governance strategies, it’s especially important to include, highlight and celebrate successful women and people of color. “There was no other organization that we considered for our media partner because GreenBiz has a world-class team of communicators and their dedication to both sustainability and transparency mirrors that of the alums. We are truly delighted to be working with this incredible group of people and welcome Heather Clancy as a board member,” said Rochelle Routman, president and chairman of the WSLA Alumnae Group.  Routman, chief sustainability and quality officer for flooring company HTMX Industries, also announced the organization’s new board and officers ahead of its general meeting this week. All (except for me) are past WSLA honorees. Aside from Routman, here’s the complete list with officers listed first and the remainder listed alphabetically: Lisa Colicchio, sustainability director, Metrolink (Vice President) Heather White, president & CEO, Heather White Strategies, LLC (Secretary) Sandra Leibowitz, managing principal, Sustainable Design Consulting, LLC (Treasurer) Ranae Anderson, global sustainability leader, Universal Fibers Jennifer Berthelot-Jelovic, president and CEO, A SustainAble Production, LLC (ASAP) Heather Clancy, editorial director, GreenBiz Daniele Horton, founder and president, Verdani Partners Janice Lao, ESG director, Helen of Troy Alicia Silva, director and founder, Revitaliza Consultores Kathleen Smith, director, technical support services, International Living Future Institute “I’m very excited about working with these new officers and the new board. Each of them brings a diverse perspective and valuable experience necessary to launch this new organization into a truly viable and influential force,” Routman said. “We want to take the organization further, particularly by mentoring other equally dedicated women in the field., which will result in greater positive change on a global scale in both the environmental and social realms.” Stay tuned for information about the 2021 call for entries in January. Topics Careers Women Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off

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Vince Digneo on Adobe’s three pillars of sustainability

December 5, 2020 by  
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Vince Digneo on Adobe’s three pillars of sustainability This video is sponsored by Adobe. “It’s everything from policy advocacy, to thought leadership, to our entire value chain sustainability, and our work with some really valuable NGOs like REBA, CERES, and the Environmental Paper Network. Having those kinds of relationships throughout our entire business is the ecosystem.” Pete May, president of GreenBiz, interviewed Vince Digneo, head of sustainability at Adobe, during the VERGE 20 virtual event (October 26-30, 2020). View archived videos from the conference here: https://bit.ly/3kMjeXt . taylor flores Fri, 12/04/2020 – 16:16 Featured Off

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