Kraft Heinz sustainability chief reflects on ‘interdependence’

October 28, 2020 by  
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Kraft Heinz sustainability chief reflects on ‘interdependence’ Heather Clancy Wed, 10/28/2020 – 01:00 Food company Kraft Heinz has been relatively quiet about its corporate sustainability strategy in the five years since it was formed through the merger of food giants Kraft and Heinz — stepping out in early 2018 to provide an update . In September, the maker of well-known brands such as Kraft Macaroni & Cheese, Planter’s Nuts and Heinz Ketchup — which had $25 billion in revenue last year — spoke up again with a second combined report that shows it stalled on 2020 goals for energy and water through last year (it will miss both) and doubles down on work to create circular production processes for packaging (it’s ahead of schedule and will introduce the first circular Heinz bottle in Europe next year). Kraft Heinz also updated its commitments with new targets pegged to 2025. Here are some of the latest commitments, along with perspective on progress so far: Procure most electricity from renewable sources by 2025 and decrease energy usage by 15 percent. The company didn’t previously have a renewables target, but it has been emphasizing a goal to reduce energy consumption (per metric ton of product produced) by 15 percent, which it had hoped to achieve by this year. Through 2019, it managed a 1 percent reduction against a 2015 baseline. Decrease water usage by 20 percent at high-risk sites and 15 percent overall by 2025 (per metric ton of product made). The company had hoped to reduce consumption by 15 percent by this year, against a 2015 baseline, but it actually increased water use by 1 percent per metric ton of product produced.   Decrease waste by 20 percent across all Kraft Heinz manufacturing operations by 2025. That’s a higher percentage than its previous commitment, which focused on waste to landfill. The company actually increased waste to landfill by 16 percent through 2019 but is has pledged to focus more closely on “a strong byproducts plan, product donation strategy and improved forecasting.” Make 100 percent recyclable, reusable or compostable packaging by 2025. Through 2019, it has achieved 70 percent. Kraft Heinz is undergoing an assessment so it can set a science-based target for greenhouse gas emissions reduction. Emissions have increased since its 2015 baseline, although the company managed a 5 percent cut from 2018 to 2019. Responsible sourcing is a big focus , with the company aiming for 100 percent sustainably sourced tomatoes by 2025, 100 percent sustainable and traceable palm oil by 2022, and 100 percent cage-free eggs globally by 2025 (among other ingredients). Rashida La Lande, general counsel at Kraft Heinz, took on responsibility for the company’s environmental, social and governance (ESG) strategy at the end of 2018. I caught up with her recently for a brief conversation as the company disclosed its new target, chatting about how best practices from the previously independent companies have been shared, how the pandemic has affected progress and what’s to come for sustainable agricultural practices. Below is a transcript of that discussion, edited for style and length. Heather Clancy: It seems unusual for a general counsel to have this role. What prompted the decision to make it part of your responsibilities? Rashida La Lande: I think it was a couple of things. There are some general counsels that have it. It sometimes falls within corporate affairs, sometimes it falls within procurement. I think for depending on where you see it, it kind of reflects the way that the company might focus on the issue. From our perspective I think it reflects several things. One, it reflects the fact that it’s a passion of mine. It’s something I view, and I think is important. And I think at the time our CEO wanted to make sure that someone who was passionate about it and had real sense of the business and the industry was leading it. The environmental and, of course, the social are hugely important to us but we really start from the perspective of how can we design policy and reporting to maximize our result. In addition, when we look at ESG, I think the fact that it’s within legal also reflects the heavy importance that we put on its governance. From the governance part of it — meaning the reporting level of the board, the oversight, the disclosure — we really truly do believe that what you track, what you measure, what you report on, what you compensate on are the things that you see effectively change. So, of course, the environmental and, of course, the social are hugely important to us but we really start from the perspective of how can we design policy and reporting to maximize our result. Clancy: How is your team blending the legacy knowledge of the two separate programs at Kraft and Heinz? La Lande: That’s a really good question. Business continuity was the primary focus of the merger and of aligning the two companies. And they had very different sustainability programs at the time. Right now, what we’re trying to do is to make sure that the ESG focuses on the key parts of our enterprise strategy so we put the time and resources behind our commitments and where we think we can drive the biggest change. With the merger, we’re able to assess what each company was doing and how they were thinking about it. Frankly [we could] identify where we can take the things that they were doing best and then identify the things that each side needed to do better. So, for example, we had strong sustainable palm oil sourcing programs on the Kraft side whereas on the Heinz side there was a really strong focus on agricultural and sustainable agriculture commitments stemming from ketchup and our use of tomatoes. … Both companies had really strong histories of philanthropical support, Heinz in particular with the relationship it had in Pittsburgh. And so it’s coming together and really thinking about as a food company how can we best talk about food insecurity and feeding people globally, which is something that really gels from both companies’ background. Media Source Courtesy of Media Authorship Kraft Heinz Close Authorship Clancy: How has the pandemic changed the focus of the Kraft Heinz ESG team? La Lande: It really put a focus on how much of a global company we are and our interdependence through all of our systems, businesses, units and people. And frankly, it has highlighted some of the ways that our global ESG perspective [is a strength] for us as a company and how important it is for our strategy. One of the things that we have been talking about since I started working on ESG is how important it is for us to support our community in their time of need. So we really looked at places where we’ve got employees and factories and consumers and customers, and we started to do more programming around not only the food insecurity but also making sure that we were available to people at the time of the disaster. So when the pandemic hit, it really caused us to quickly recognize that how we were thinking about this already, in terms of community, disaster relief and feeding people, put us in a really unique position to be impactful and to think about the global need that was going to be coming from the pandemic. So, we committed to provide meals to those in need and trying to do what we could to eliminate global hunger. And the pandemic just punctuated the need. At this point, to date, we’ve donated more than $15 million in financial and product support to help people all across the globe access the food that they need. And we’ve done it both in a fast time, mobile way as well as [through] a local touchpoint where we have business and community impact. Clancy: I know I’m jumping around a little bit. That’s the nature of having only a few minutes with you. What is the company’s policy for protecting biodiversity? La Lande: Right now, we’re working to update our sustainable agricultural practice by the end of 2020. We’re doing the work with a very seasoned agricultural team … primarily coming from the Heinz side but not exclusively. We have a strong history of sustainable agriculture. We’re working with developing that program further based on input from our growers and our suppliers, the farmers that we buy from. And we even have an upcoming “In Our Roots” program where we’re going to be working with suppliers to ensure that all of their agricultural practices satisfy our customer needs for safe food and traceable origin, [and] satisfy consumer demands for reliable supply, particularly of affordable nutritious food. We focus on promoting and protecting the health and welfare and the economic prosperity of the farmers, the workers, the employees and the communities within our supply chain. We’re very focused on minimizing our adverse effects on the Earth’s natural resources and biodiversity. We think those are the ways that we’re going to contribute, and that’s what we’re focusing on as we develop this program. We expect to roll it out more effectively — more widely, I should say — in 2021. Our main focus is on being good stewards of the environment, sourcing responsibilities, tracking and verifying where our ingredients come from, making our concerns and commitments with our suppliers and our supply chain very clear. Clancy: Will regenerative ag be part of that? La Lande: I think that is one of the things that we’re talking about, but I think we’ll have an ability to think more specifically about it once we make a more specific announcement in 2021. Clancy: Fair enough. How does Kraft Heinz blend environmental justice considerations into its ESG strategy? La Lande: Our main focus is on being good stewards of the environment, sourcing responsibilities, tracking and verifying where our ingredients come from, making our concerns and commitments with our suppliers and our supply chain very clear. Working and partnering with our supply chain to make sure that they have the training and expertise and understanding of our expectations. And verifying our ingredients, where they come from, what the impacts of our operations are. Through all of this, we think we’re better able to ensure that our environmental impacts are not so delineated by socioeconomic or demographic lines and instead really focus on how we can impact and have good stewardship worldwide. That’s why you see one of our key pillars being environmental stewardship as a global strategy. Clancy: You probably have 18 priorities or probably 18 million priorities. But what do you feel is your most important priority in this moment? La Lande : My goodness. I do have 18 million priorities. But for me, I think in this moment in the pandemic it’s really the focus on feeding people. There is a lot of hardship that people are facing. Unfortunately, I think there’s going to be more hardship kind of globally before we [as a society] get ourselves out of the position that we’re currently in. So I think while everything that we’re doing is extremely important, I think the day-to-day needs that we’re seeing and addressing those needs for people have to be at the forefront of what we do and have to be our first commitment. Pull Quote The environmental and, of course, the social are hugely important to us but we really start from the perspective of how can we design policy and reporting to maximize our result. Our main focus is on being good stewards of the environment, sourcing responsibilities, tracking and verifying where our ingredients come from, making our concerns and commitments with our suppliers and our supply chain very clear. Topics Food & Agriculture Collective Insight The GreenBiz Interview Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Kraft Heinz general counsel Rashida La Lande leads the giant food company’s corporate social responsibility and ESG strategy. Courtesy of Kraft Heinz Close Authorship

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Proud Pour wines and cider benefit bees, oceans and coral reefs

September 29, 2020 by  
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Winemaking is one of the world’s oldest arts, spanning thousands of years. This has evolved into an industry that fuels destination travel, wedding venues and lively dinner conversation. Now, we can add sustainable practices to that list of accomplishments with a new line of wines by Proud Pour, whose aim is to inspire the environmentalist in everyone, even those who simply want to enjoy a pleasant glass of wine. Proud Pour began in New York City in 2014 when founder Berlin Kelly realized wine could be an avenue for environmental improvements. “I was living in NYC and drinking almost every night with my friends when I learned that NY Harbor has lost 95% of their wild oysters ,” Kelly explained. “I launched Proud Pour wines to raise money for NYC oyster restoration with the Billion Oyster Project , our first environmental partner.” Related: The differences between organic, natural, biodynamic and sustainable wines It’s easy to be inspired to save oysters and their habitat, because they are a critical filter for the oceans . In fact, a single oyster cleans 30 gallons of ocean water each day. To bring the project full circle, Proud Pour produces a Sauvignon Blanc labeled “Save the Ocean” (as in Save-ignon). Each bottle funds restoration efforts for 100 wild oysters. Efforts so far have provided restored habitats for 12 million wild oysters. A second offering from the company focuses on bee health . “Pinot for Bees” is a Pinot Noir that highlights the need for providing bee habitat. As the print on the bottle explains, “Every bottle plants 300 wildflowers,” which is equivalent to 35 square feet of prime bee habitat. Because bees are credited with providing one out of every three bites of food we eat, it’s great to see the company report that wine-lovers have already funded the planting of 75 acres of wildflowers. The third current selection is labeled, “Rosé for Reefs,” a rosé aimed at educating wine-lovers about the importance of coral reefs . According to the bottle, “Coral reefs cover just 1% of the ocean floor but support 25% of all marine life.” With that in mind, each three cases of this wine results in one new baby coral planting. To date, the company has funded the growth and planting of 112 baby corals. For those with a different palette and passion for sea turtles, Proud Pour produces a cider made from Connecticut River Valley apples. Like all of its products, Proud Pour’s Cider for Sea Turtles is sustainably grown and vegan . Proceeds from the cider fund the work at sea turtle hospitals that rescue and care for injured sea turtles so they can return to the ocean. The adventure that is Proud Pour is the result of a two-person show that includes Berlin Kelly, founder, and Brian Thurber, CEO. Thurber came on board in 2015, the same year the wine began hitting the store shelves. Even though just the two of them run the company, they rely on a host of partners to bring the project from grape to nonprofit funding. The process begins by connecting with high quality, sustainable winemakers in Oregon and California. On the other end of the process, they rely on nonprofits who work to protect bees, wild oysters, sea turtles and coral reefs, with more missions on the radar. Thurber told Inhabitat, “Up next are Grenache for Gray Wolves, Chardonnay for Sharks , and Syrah for Soil.” While myriad companies have joined 1% For the Planet as a way to give 1% of their net profits to environmental causes, Proud Pour has pledged a larger commitment. Proud Pour donates 5% of its top-line revenue, meaning the donation amount is calculated from the revenue, not the amount leftover after everyone gets paid. Proceeds are delivered to 22 environmental nonprofits across the U.S. Six years into the enterprise, the wines can be found in over 700 shops and restaurants in 18 states. That means there are more than 700 opportunities to spread the word about the environment and sustainable actions. “We’re making Proud Pour into the ultimate tool for recruiting new environmentalists,” Thurber said. “Our fans already use the wines as a casual way to talk about the environment with friends, and we’ll be building new storytelling tools to make those conversations a snap.” The current wines can be found online with shipping to 43 states. Each order is sustainably packaged with carbon-neutral shipping. Cider For Sea Turtles is only available in stores. While sale proceeds help restore invaluable ecosystems, the overall vision of Proud Pour is to facilitate conversations about the environment with a goal to create 5 million new environmentalists over the next decade. It seems like a reasonable discussion to have over a glass of wine. Inhabitat’s review of Proud Pour wines Occasionally companies offer to send us product samples so we can provide you with a well-rounded perspective, and let me tell you, few have been more fun to sample than Proud Pour Wines. Reviewing wine is entirely subjective, so obviously this is my layman’s opinion. The bottles are blanketed with the message of environmental awareness and it’s a beautiful thing — both informative and direct. Save the Ocean, the Sauvignon Blanc, struck me as buttery with a hint of citrus. It’s got more punch than a chardonnay but is tame enough for easy drinking. I can see how it would pair well with oysters and other seafood . Pinot for the Bees was my personal favorite, considering I’m a red wine fan. Living in Oregon, I’m spoiled by Pinot Noir, so I wasn’t surprised to discover the wine was vinted and bottled a few hours from my house. I found the vintage to be light and smooth. Although it lacks the complexity of big reds, most Pinots do, so it’s not a strike, just more of a profile note. Speaking of notes, this is an easy drinker any time of year. Rosé for Reefs is a light and crisp option. It’s not a sweet rosé but very quaffable with a gorgeous, medium-pink color. We added strawberries for a burst of fresh, late-summer flavor. Overall, each wine was a solid option in its own right, and the printed bottle is a beautiful representation of what conversations around sustainable actions should look like. Cheers to that. + Proud Pour Images via Proud Pour and Dawn Hammon / Inhabitat Editor’s Note: This product review is not sponsored by Proud Pour. All opinions on the products and company are the author’s own.

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California votes to protect Joshua trees

September 29, 2020 by  
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This week, the California State Fish and Game Commission unanimously voted to protect Western Joshua trees. In a move that is first of its kind, the Joshua trees will be protected for a year under the  California Endangered Species Act . During this year of protection, researchers will analyze threats to the species. The Western Joshua trees are beautiful, tall trees that are native to Southern California. They have become the first plant species in California to be granted protection from climate change. The vote now means that all the Joshua trees in the state will not be harvested for any purpose for a period of one year. In the meantime, a team of researchers will be looking into the state of affairs of the trees. After one year of research, the commission will have to make a decision as to whether the trees will be protected permanently or not. Related: Water pollution inspires the Lake Erie Bill of Rights to improve water quality The petition that has been approved was submitted by the Center for Biological Diversity , which raised concerns over the increasing threat of climate change. The petition cited heatwaves and worsening drought among the main reasons to protect the trees. In two previous attempts, the commission put off voting. Members of the commission were conflicted based on an outpour of public comments for and against conserving the trees. While conservationists have been pushing for protection, developers have put up a spirited campaign against such a move. But recent fires and extreme weather events seem to have jolted members of the commission into reality. According to Brendan Cummings, conservation director at the Center for Biological Diversity, the vote is a big win for the trees and the environment at large. “This is a huge victory for these beautiful trees and their fragile desert ecosystem,” Cummings said. “If Joshua trees are to survive the inhospitable climate we’re giving them, the first and most important thing we can do is protect their habitat. This decision will do that across most of their range.” The decision to protect these trees will not be enough if efforts are not made to reverse the effects of climate change . According to recent research, only 0.02% of the Joshua trees’ habitat in Joshua Tree National Park will remain habitable if the current state of greenhouse gas emissions is maintained. The research suggests that even drastic measures taken to curb emissions would keep only 18.6% of the habitat viable for the trees’ survival. The damage done to the Joshua trees is already massive. In August alone, a wildfire damaged about 43,000 acres of the Mojave National Park, burning over 1.3 million plants. Via Gizmodo Image via Pixabay

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Vacant lots are being transformed into urban bee farms in Detroit

February 9, 2018 by  
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“Work hard, stay bumble,” is the motto of Detroit nonprofit Detroit Hives . The organization aims to conserve honeybees by turning abandoned urban lots into community bee farms. Timothy Paule and Nicole Lindsey started the nonprofit last year, and so far they’ve transformed one lot into a space with vegetable garden plots and three hives – and they’re just getting started. Something’s buzzing in Detroit. Detroit Hives is tackling a few issues, namely honeybee conservation , blight in the city created by vacant lots , and educating the community on bees . Paule told HuffPost the inspiration came from a cold that just wouldn’t go away. A local market worker told him to try local honey for its medicinal properties. He and Lindsey also began to realize how urban blight might play a part in allergies, as overgrown ragweeds took over. They could tackle that issue by producing local honey on vacant sites. Related: America’s first urban ‘agrihood’ feeds 2,000 households for free Lindsey and Paule took beekeeping courses and purchased their first vacant lot for $340 on Detroit’s East Side. Thousands of bees now buzz on the lot, and the neighbors love the farm, according to Lindsey. We transform Detroit Vacant lots into urban bee farms. We are responsible for a quarter of a million honey bees in the East Warren community and we offer tours and bee education for the community. Work Hard, Stay Bumble. #DetroitHives #Savethebees #UrbanBeekeeper #UrbanBeeFarm #Detroit #Michigan #PureMichigan #Nonprofit #VizzeeInc #Honey #Support #Donate #Canon #Beekeeper A post shared by Detroit Hives (@detroithives) on Aug 25, 2017 at 2:47pm PDT She told HuffPost, “They say they wish we were there 10, 20 years ago. That area has always been a place where people dump trash, so when we came there, we gave that area a sense of purpose. The neighbors keep an eye on the area to make sure that people aren’t dumping anymore.” We bring bee consciousness to your community by transforming blighted land into honey bee conservations. #beekeeping #DetroitHives #Michigan #PureMichigan #DNR #MDNR #urbanbeekeeper #blackgirlmagic #beeeducation #rawhoney #adidasoriginals #blackbeekeepers #blackbeekeeper A post shared by Detroit Hives (@detroithives) on Aug 4, 2017 at 10:58am PDT Per Black Enterprise, Detroit Hives has partnered with local vendors like The Black Bottom Brewery, Detroit Soup, and a homeless shelter to provide local, raw honey, and they also sell their sweet product. They offer public tours and speak at schools in the area to help the community learn more about bees. They aim to expand beyond their first farm this year. + Detroit Hives Via Black Enterprise and HuffPost Images via Eric Ward on Unsplash and Massimiliano Latella on Unsplash

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Last orca bred in captivity at SeaWorld dies, aged 3 months

July 28, 2017 by  
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Keepers and animal rights activists are mourning the passing of the last orca bred in captivity under SeaWorld’s breeding program, which ended in 2016. The calf, named Kyara, was just three-months-old when she perished at the establishment’s San Antonio, Texas, park due to an unknown illness. Regrettably, she is the third killer whale to die at a SeaWorld park in 18 months. According to a statement made by SeaWorld on July 25, the exact cause of Kyara’s death is presently unknown. Additionally, the results of the post-mortem will take several weeks to be completed. Leading up to the calf’s death, however, she was being treated for a serious case of pneumonia . The marine park establishment is adamant the illness is not a result of living in captivity. In a statement , SeaWorld wrote that pneumonia is “the most common cause of mortality and illness in whales in dolphins, both in the wild and in zoological facilities.” “We’ve also had a lot of questions about how the orca pod in San Antonio is doing. We’ve checked in with the trainers, veterinarians and staff who all say that Takara and the orca pod are doing well,” the statement added. “They have been active all day and are engaging with the trainers, and we will continue to monitor any changes in their behavior.” SeaWorld announced it would end its controversial captive breeding program three years after the controversial documentary Blackfish was produced. The BAFTA-nominated film informed the public of the serious ethical concerns which result from keeping orcas in captivity and the questionable tactics used by employees to “train” orcas. Due to public outcry and plummeting ticket sales, the enterprise had no choice but to shut down the program. It is assumed that Kyara’s mother, Takara, became pregnant with the calf around the same time, as gestation in an orca lasts between 12 to 18 months. Because Kyara was the last killer whale bred in captivity, she was a treasure at SeaWorld . However, there is a reason the public requested SeaWorld end its breeding program, and that is because the mammals have been known to thrive beyond 100-years-old in the wild . Sadly, the young calf survived only three months in captivity. Related: Meet the 103-Year-Old Granny Orca That Spells Bad News for SeaWorld’s PR Upon hearing the news, John Hargrove, a former orca trainer at SeaWorld who appeared in Blackfish, tweeted : “I am grateful Tiki’s calf only lived for 3 months in a concrete box deprived of all things natural. For Takara, my heart is broken in pieces.” He added , “It’s an absolute insult to every one of us that they keep saying ‘healthy and thriving’ as they are dying from disease right in front of us.” Via NBC News Images via SeaWorld , Pixabay

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To build sustainable products, listen to your customers

December 4, 2015 by  
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Emerging research shatters the focus on reducing risks and costs. 3M, HP Enterprise and J&J chime in.

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Why it’s time to radically rethink supply chains

November 3, 2015 by  
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Cargill, Fiat-Chrysler and Hewlett-Packard Enterprise help illustrate the evolution of supply chain sustainability.

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This is What NASA’s Warp-Capable Enterprise Starship Would Look Like!

June 12, 2014 by  
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NASA’s Dr. Harold ‘Sonny’ White is working on a real-life warp drive that could transport people across the galaxy. However before we start boldly going where no man has gone before, we’re going to need a starship. Dr. White recently teamed up with artist Mark Rademaker to unveil a realistic design of what his theoretical warp-capable ship will look like. It looks like something worthy of Starfleet – and it’s called the Enterprise! Read the rest of This is What NASA’s Warp-Capable Enterprise Starship Would Look Like! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: dr harold white , faster than light speed , INX Enterprise , light speed , Mark Rademaker , sonny white , spaceship , star trek , starship , USS enterprise , warp drive , warp starship

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Afrique Authentique – Authentic Africa Brings the Green Textile Traditions of Africa to the World

July 3, 2013 by  
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Afrique Authentique – Authentic Africa is an organization that aims to empower local craftspeople in Burkina Faso in Western Africa. The collective recently showcased its first 100% hand-woven African fabric collection, which matches an ancient traditional craft with modern technology and combines indigenous design with contemporary interpretation. The initiative ensures the cultural survival of West Africa’s traditional hand-loom weaving skills while creating jobs for the people of Burkina Faso. Read the rest of Afrique Authentique – Authentic Africa Brings the Green Textile Traditions of Africa to the World Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: AA-AA , African Textiles , AfriqueAuthentique-AuthenticAfrica , British European Design Group , Burkina Faso , Centre for the Development of Enterprise , cotton , eco textiles , Empowering Africa , Empowering Locals , Handwoven , ICFF New York , Save Our Skills , West Africa        

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Stanford University’s Prefab Start.Home Empowers People to Live More Sustainably

July 3, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Stanford University’s Prefab Start.Home Empowers People to Live More Sustainably Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , 2013 solar decathlon , bay area , eco design , eco home , energy core , green architecture , Green Building , green design , green home , prefab home , San Francisco , smart home , Solar Decathlon , solar home , stanford , stanford university , start.home , Sustainable Building , sustainable design , sustainable home        

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