Calpine Energy Solutions

April 12, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Calpine Energy Solutions taylor flores Mon, 04/12/2021 – 16:25

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Calpine Energy Solutions

The Next Frontier: Engaging Employees In Sustainability

April 12, 2021 by  
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The Next Frontier: Engaging Employees In Sustainability Date/Time: April 27, 2021 (1-2PM ET / 10-11AM PT) As corporations of all sizes increase sustainability commitments and take decisive action on climate change, some companies have begun engaging their employees in corporate-sponsored sustainability initiatives.  These initiatives can directly reduce employee carbon emissions and can also have many indirect benefits, including increasing overall employee engagement and satisfaction scores. Recent examples of new employee sustainability initiatives include: community solar projects, tree-planting initiatives, incentives for installing electric heat pumps, rideshare programs; and regenerative agriculture. In this webcast, you will learn how sustainability leaders at Microsoft, Akamai and Common Energy have implemented these programs successfully, including: Senior stakeholder engagement, Contracting, Communications strategy, Employee follow-up, and Measuring results Moderator: Joel Makower, Chairman & Executive Editor, GreenBiz Speakers:  Richard Keiser, CEO & Founder, Common Energy Holly Beale, Senior Program Manager, Community Environmental Sustainability, Microsoft Courtney Hadden, Senior Program Manager, Corporate Sustainability, Akamai If you can’t tune in live, please register and we will email you a link to access the archived webcast footage and resources, available to you on-demand after the webcast. taylor flores Mon, 04/12/2021 – 14:28 Joel Makower Chairman & Executive Editor GreenBiz Group @makower Richard Keiser CEO & Founder Common Energy @mycommonenergy Holly Beale Senior Program Manager, Community Environmental Sustainability Microsoft Courtney Hadden Senior Program Manager, Corporate Sustainability Akamai gbz_webcast_date Tue, 04/27/2021 – 10:00 – Tue, 04/27/2021 – 11:00

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The Next Frontier: Engaging Employees In Sustainability

Earth911 Podcast: Joe Gantz on His New Film, The Race to Save the World

April 12, 2021 by  
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Director Joe Gantz’s new film, The Race to Save the World, captures the energy and… The post Earth911 Podcast: Joe Gantz on His New Film, The Race to Save the World appeared first on Earth911.

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Earth911 Podcast: Joe Gantz on His New Film, The Race to Save the World

10 Sustainable Choices for Tea, Coffee, and Yerba Mate

April 12, 2021 by  
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Who doesn’t like to start the day with a delicious cup of coffee or tea?… The post 10 Sustainable Choices for Tea, Coffee, and Yerba Mate appeared first on Earth911.

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10 Sustainable Choices for Tea, Coffee, and Yerba Mate

Where progressives and conservatives agree on clean energy

April 9, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Where progressives and conservatives agree on clean energy Sarah Golden Fri, 04/09/2021 – 01:45 From an ideological perspective, it’s curious that clean energy became a partisan issue. Looking at it as a technology, there is a ton to like about renewables across the political spectrum.  This hasn’t escaped political conservatives outside the beltway. A number of conservative groups champion clean energy, from the Conservative Energy Network (CEN) and Young Conservatives for Energy Reform (YCER) to the Christian Coalition for America .  As the federal government considers a massive infrastructure bill that would spur clean energy growth and decarbonize the economy, it’s worth looking at where the conservative and progressive ideologies align on clean energy, and where they diverge.  CONVERGENCE: Energy independence Nothing should be more on-brand for conservatives than owning and controlling your own power. Solar panels could be rebranded as “don’t-take-my-gun-away energy.” Perhaps this is why CEN calls subscribers “energy patriots.” When millions lost power during Texas’ deadly energy crisis in February, former governor Rick Perry expressed this sentiment of rugged individualism — even if it came at the expense of grid resilience.  “Texans would be without electricity for longer than three days to keep the federal government out of their business,” Perry said.  Of course, independence and resilience shouldn’t be a tradeoff, and no one is advocating it should be. The point is that the concept of energy independence — be it from other nations or your own government — is an attractive idea across the political spectrum.  From a national security perspective, clean energy also allows the U.S. to become less reliant on foreign oil states. The Military Advisory Board, a group of retired high-level officers from the U.S. Armed Forces, sees getting off foreign oil and getting onto clean energy as a top national security concern — both in terms of the threats that emerge from climate change and the resources the U.S. expends to secure foreign oil interests.  “As new energy options emerge to meet global demand, nations that lead stand to gain; should the U.S. sit on the sidelines, it does so at considerable risk to our national security,” writes the group on its website .  CONVERGENCE: Local empowerment Some rural communities are beginning to reap economic development benefits from renewables, warming locals to the solar and wind industries. A report from RMI, ” Seeds of Opportunity ,” says that by 2030, annual revenues from wind and solar projects could exceed $60 billion. That’s on par with the expected revenues from corn, soy and beef combined, America’s top three agricultural commodities. In Texas, renewable energy projects are expected to generate upwards of $5.7 billion in tax revenue for communities and $7.3 billion directly to landowners in lease payments over the life of the projects. This is a welcome revenue stream for farmers trying to make ends meet and communities historically dependent on oil and gas.  “The cows love wind turbines; they walk around them all day and follow the shadows that they cast,” said Louis Brooks Jr. of Nolan County, a Texas rancher, in a report . “We now have good roads on our land [because of the wind farm] that make it easier to take care of our cattle. It has been super. … It is not perfect, but I wish we had more of them on our land.” In Wyoming, towns previously reliant on fossil fuels have seen local budgets grow thanks to wind tax revenue, including Cheyenne and Rawlins . The local potential of clean energy is key to some progressive clean energy organizations’ agendas, as well. The Solutions Project , for example, funds 100 local organizations designed to bring the benefits of clean energy to marginalized communities. BlocPower works to bring advanced energy technologies to low-income homes in urban settings.  At the core of these initiatives: owning and controlling energy supports local economies.  CONVERGENCE: American competitiveness America has a proud history of innovation. But the nation has fallen behind in clean energy investment and risks missing out on growing markets. The U.S. ranks fourth , behind Japan, China and the European Union, on research and development for energy technologies as a share of GDP. President Joe Biden’s infrastructure bill includes investments to make American companies competitive in the race to develop affordable clean energy technologies. The goal would be to grow the economy and create millions of jobs. For example, China is dominating in battery innovation and manufacturing globally. Through Biden’s proposed $174 billion investment in the electric vehicle market , the administration sees a path to a domestic supply chain that would keep the economic benefits in America — and position manufacturers to sell abroad.  America’s innovative spirit fits nicely into conservative ideology, as summarized in this quote from Tyler Duvelius, CEN’s director of external affairs (and YCER alum): “America gave the world flight, we put man on the moon and harnessed electricity. Clean energy is the next great frontier of American innovation.” Of course, conservatives also have balked at the idea of the government picking winners, and they point to past clean energy failures as a sign of government overreach. The poster child for this is Solyndra , a solar company that received federal grant money from the 2009 stimulus bill and later went bankrupt.  Progressives point to these investments as an important part of spurring forward other burgeoning technologies, from smartphones to natural gas and the internet.  “You have to step up to the plate and take a swing in order to hit the ball, and sometimes you swing and you miss,” U.S. Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm to the New York Times . “But if you never swing, you will never hit the ball, and you’ll never get a run. So the overall benefits of the Obama-era clean energy investments were overwhelmingly a net positive.” DIVERGENCE: Equating social justice and clean energy policy Over the years, the fight for racial justice and climate actions have merged in some progressive circles. They are different sides of the same fight, so it is impossible to systematically address one without the others. As a candidate, Biden’s climate platform featured addressing environmental racism as one of its five planks. Today, the infrastructure bill features provisions focused on fighting racial and economic inequities.  According to reports, Republicans scoff at those provisions, calling them a “Trojan horse” of liberal policies. The CEN website echoes the idea that the infrastructure proposal is too sweeping in its focus on racial justice. “We cannot afford to wrap a costly political wishlist into a broader infrastructure package,” wrote CEN’s director of policy and advocacy, Landon Stevens, in an op-ed on the organization’s website. Of course, conservatives can see the economic potential of embracing clean energy without supporting the social justice elements. But this ideological divergence touches such polarizing topics, it seems to inspire everyone to dig in their heels.  DIVERGENCE: The role of fossil fuels in the transition Most progressive organizations, using climate science as a guide, advocate for the quick transition away from all fossil fuels.  Language from conservative clean energy advocates instead talks about “market-based” transitions for encouraging alternatives.  “Our solutions are simple yet effective,” wrote a group of Republican members of Congress in an op-ed last month, including Rep. Dan Newhouse (Washington) and Rep. Kevin McCarthy (California). “Where many Democrats want to shut down, ban and overregulate, we want to incentivize, innovate and progress through market-based solutions.” Those guided by climate science point to the need to rapidly transition — faster than market forces can act. They also note that decades-long disinformation campaigns from fossil fuels companies mean we’re decades behind on the transition and that delaying action is the latest incarnation of climate denial.  Rewiring America, an organization that has mapped out how to combat climate change through electrification that leans progressive, argues that policy mandate is the only way to reach our climate goals.  “The invisible hand of markets is definitely not fast enough; it typically takes decades for a new technology to become dominant by market forces alone as it slowly increases its market share each year,” the Rewiring America handbook says. “A carbon tax isn’t fast enough, either. Market subsidies are not fast enough.” While there are certainly differences in the conservative and progressive approach to America’s clean energy future, it’s possible we’re closer to agreement than we think. And that, perhaps, the points of divergence (which are truly important and shouldn’t be ignored), don’t need to stand in the way of progress where it can be made. Especially at a moment when two-thirds of Americans think the government should do more on climate. Want more great analysis of the clean energy transition? Sign up for Energy Weekly , our free email newsletter. Topics Energy & Climate Policy & Politics Featured Column Power Points Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Shutterstock Lightspring Close Authorship

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Where progressives and conservatives agree on clean energy

Where progressives and conservatives agree on clean energy

April 9, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Where progressives and conservatives agree on clean energy Sarah Golden Fri, 04/09/2021 – 01:45 From an ideological perspective, it’s curious that clean energy became a partisan issue. Looking at it as a technology, there is a ton to like about renewables across the political spectrum.  This hasn’t escaped political conservatives outside the beltway. A number of conservative groups champion clean energy, from the Conservative Energy Network (CEN) and Young Conservatives for Energy Reform (YCER) to the Christian Coalition for America .  As the federal government considers a massive infrastructure bill that would spur clean energy growth and decarbonize the economy, it’s worth looking at where the conservative and progressive ideologies align on clean energy, and where they diverge.  CONVERGENCE: Energy independence Nothing should be more on-brand for conservatives than owning and controlling your own power. Solar panels could be rebranded as “don’t-take-my-gun-away energy.” Perhaps this is why CEN calls subscribers “energy patriots.” When millions lost power during Texas’ deadly energy crisis in February, former governor Rick Perry expressed this sentiment of rugged individualism — even if it came at the expense of grid resilience.  “Texans would be without electricity for longer than three days to keep the federal government out of their business,” Perry said.  Of course, independence and resilience shouldn’t be a tradeoff, and no one is advocating it should be. The point is that the concept of energy independence — be it from other nations or your own government — is an attractive idea across the political spectrum.  From a national security perspective, clean energy also allows the U.S. to become less reliant on foreign oil states. The Military Advisory Board, a group of retired high-level officers from the U.S. Armed Forces, sees getting off foreign oil and getting onto clean energy as a top national security concern — both in terms of the threats that emerge from climate change and the resources the U.S. expends to secure foreign oil interests.  “As new energy options emerge to meet global demand, nations that lead stand to gain; should the U.S. sit on the sidelines, it does so at considerable risk to our national security,” writes the group on its website .  CONVERGENCE: Local empowerment Some rural communities are beginning to reap economic development benefits from renewables, warming locals to the solar and wind industries. A report from RMI, ” Seeds of Opportunity ,” says that by 2030, annual revenues from wind and solar projects could exceed $60 billion. That’s on par with the expected revenues from corn, soy and beef combined, America’s top three agricultural commodities. In Texas, renewable energy projects are expected to generate upwards of $5.7 billion in tax revenue for communities and $7.3 billion directly to landowners in lease payments over the life of the projects. This is a welcome revenue stream for farmers trying to make ends meet and communities historically dependent on oil and gas.  “The cows love wind turbines; they walk around them all day and follow the shadows that they cast,” said Louis Brooks Jr. of Nolan County, a Texas rancher, in a report . “We now have good roads on our land [because of the wind farm] that make it easier to take care of our cattle. It has been super. … It is not perfect, but I wish we had more of them on our land.” In Wyoming, towns previously reliant on fossil fuels have seen local budgets grow thanks to wind tax revenue, including Cheyenne and Rawlins . The local potential of clean energy is key to some progressive clean energy organizations’ agendas, as well. The Solutions Project , for example, funds 100 local organizations designed to bring the benefits of clean energy to marginalized communities. BlocPower works to bring advanced energy technologies to low-income homes in urban settings.  At the core of these initiatives: owning and controlling energy supports local economies.  CONVERGENCE: American competitiveness America has a proud history of innovation. But the nation has fallen behind in clean energy investment and risks missing out on growing markets. The U.S. ranks fourth , behind Japan, China and the European Union, on research and development for energy technologies as a share of GDP. President Joe Biden’s infrastructure bill includes investments to make American companies competitive in the race to develop affordable clean energy technologies. The goal would be to grow the economy and create millions of jobs. For example, China is dominating in battery innovation and manufacturing globally. Through Biden’s proposed $174 billion investment in the electric vehicle market , the administration sees a path to a domestic supply chain that would keep the economic benefits in America — and position manufacturers to sell abroad.  America’s innovative spirit fits nicely into conservative ideology, as summarized in this quote from Tyler Duvelius, CEN’s director of external affairs (and YCER alum): “America gave the world flight, we put man on the moon and harnessed electricity. Clean energy is the next great frontier of American innovation.” Of course, conservatives also have balked at the idea of the government picking winners, and they point to past clean energy failures as a sign of government overreach. The poster child for this is Solyndra , a solar company that received federal grant money from the 2009 stimulus bill and later went bankrupt.  Progressives point to these investments as an important part of spurring forward other burgeoning technologies, from smartphones to natural gas and the internet.  “You have to step up to the plate and take a swing in order to hit the ball, and sometimes you swing and you miss,” U.S. Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm to the New York Times . “But if you never swing, you will never hit the ball, and you’ll never get a run. So the overall benefits of the Obama-era clean energy investments were overwhelmingly a net positive.” DIVERGENCE: Equating social justice and clean energy policy Over the years, the fight for racial justice and climate actions have merged in some progressive circles. They are different sides of the same fight, so it is impossible to systematically address one without the others. As a candidate, Biden’s climate platform featured addressing environmental racism as one of its five planks. Today, the infrastructure bill features provisions focused on fighting racial and economic inequities.  According to reports, Republicans scoff at those provisions, calling them a “Trojan horse” of liberal policies. The CEN website echoes the idea that the infrastructure proposal is too sweeping in its focus on racial justice. “We cannot afford to wrap a costly political wishlist into a broader infrastructure package,” wrote CEN’s director of policy and advocacy, Landon Stevens, in an op-ed on the organization’s website. Of course, conservatives can see the economic potential of embracing clean energy without supporting the social justice elements. But this ideological divergence touches such polarizing topics, it seems to inspire everyone to dig in their heels.  DIVERGENCE: The role of fossil fuels in the transition Most progressive organizations, using climate science as a guide, advocate for the quick transition away from all fossil fuels.  Language from conservative clean energy advocates instead talks about “market-based” transitions for encouraging alternatives.  “Our solutions are simple yet effective,” wrote a group of Republican members of Congress in an op-ed last month, including Rep. Dan Newhouse (Washington) and Rep. Kevin McCarthy (California). “Where many Democrats want to shut down, ban and overregulate, we want to incentivize, innovate and progress through market-based solutions.” Those guided by climate science point to the need to rapidly transition — faster than market forces can act. They also note that decades-long disinformation campaigns from fossil fuels companies mean we’re decades behind on the transition and that delaying action is the latest incarnation of climate denial.  Rewiring America, an organization that has mapped out how to combat climate change through electrification that leans progressive, argues that policy mandate is the only way to reach our climate goals.  “The invisible hand of markets is definitely not fast enough; it typically takes decades for a new technology to become dominant by market forces alone as it slowly increases its market share each year,” the Rewiring America handbook says. “A carbon tax isn’t fast enough, either. Market subsidies are not fast enough.” While there are certainly differences in the conservative and progressive approach to America’s clean energy future, it’s possible we’re closer to agreement than we think. And that, perhaps, the points of divergence (which are truly important and shouldn’t be ignored), don’t need to stand in the way of progress where it can be made. Especially at a moment when two-thirds of Americans think the government should do more on climate. Want more great analysis of the clean energy transition? Sign up for Energy Weekly , our free email newsletter. Topics Energy & Climate Policy & Politics Featured Column Power Points Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Shutterstock Lightspring Close Authorship

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Where progressives and conservatives agree on clean energy

Episode 262: In praise of climate lobbying, renewable aggregation deals

April 2, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Episode 262: In praise of climate lobbying, renewable aggregation deals Heather Clancy Fri, 04/02/2021 – 02:00 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (2:00). ESG non-conforming: There’s more than one way to identify good companies How corporations can jump-start industrial electrification in the U.S . Netflix’s behind-the-scenes script for achieving net-zero Features Getting together to buy renewable energy (19:45) Last month, life sciences company MilliporeSigma teamed up with Akamai, Synopsis and Uber to commit to buying 111 megawatts from an Enel Green Power wind-plus-solar project in Texas. We get the details from Greg Rizzo, director of origination-commercial office at Enel, and Jeffrey Whitford, head of sustainability, social business innovation and life science branding at Millipore Sigma. Time for tech employees to speak up on climate lobbying (34:30) Nonprofit ClimateVoice is asking workers for Alphabet, Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Microsoft to sign a petition urging those companies to spend at least one-in-five of their lobbying dollars this year to support “bold, just and equitable climate policy.” Executive Director Bill Weihl discusses the campaign. *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere : “Waiting for the Moment That Never Comes,” “Knowing the Truth,” “Thinking It Over” and “Introducing the Pre-Roll” Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episode of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes or Spotify . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Topics Podcast Renewable Energy Policy & Politics Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 44:56 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 262: In praise of climate lobbying, renewable aggregation deals

Episode 262: In praise of climate lobbying, renewable aggregation deals

April 2, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Episode 262: In praise of climate lobbying, renewable aggregation deals Heather Clancy Fri, 04/02/2021 – 02:00 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (2:00). ESG non-conforming: There’s more than one way to identify good companies How corporations can jump-start industrial electrification in the U.S . Netflix’s behind-the-scenes script for achieving net-zero Features Getting together to buy renewable energy (19:45) Last month, life sciences company MilliporeSigma teamed up with Akamai, Synopsis and Uber to commit to buying 111 megawatts from an Enel Green Power wind-plus-solar project in Texas. We get the details from Greg Rizzo, director of origination-commercial office at Enel, and Jeffrey Whitford, head of sustainability, social business innovation and life science branding at Millipore Sigma. Time for tech employees to speak up on climate lobbying (34:30) Nonprofit ClimateVoice is asking workers for Alphabet, Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Microsoft to sign a petition urging those companies to spend at least one-in-five of their lobbying dollars this year to support “bold, just and equitable climate policy.” Executive Director Bill Weihl discusses the campaign. *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere : “Waiting for the Moment That Never Comes,” “Knowing the Truth,” “Thinking It Over” and “Introducing the Pre-Roll” Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episode of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes or Spotify . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Topics Podcast Renewable Energy Policy & Politics Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 44:56 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 262: In praise of climate lobbying, renewable aggregation deals

Urging clean energy and justice for tribal nations

April 1, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Urging clean energy and justice for tribal nations Roger Sorkin Thu, 04/01/2021 – 00:45 During the 20th century, coal was a cheap and reliable source of electricity. Today it’s relatively expensive and highly polluting. The shift to cleaner, less expensive renewable energy is rapidly underway, and it’s happening faster than anyone expected. Our nation’s task now is to manage that transition in a just and sustainable way so that people living in “coal country,” who made sacrifices to build our economy, are not left behind. Nowhere is this clearer than on territories of the Navajo and Hopi Nations, where for 50 years the coal-fired Navajo Generating Station (NGS) and Kayenta coal mine provided low-cost power to the Southwest, helping it to grow and prosper. A large portion of the Navajo and Hopi Nations’ income was derived from power plant lease payments and coal mining royalties. Both operations closed in 2019, resulting in an economic crisis for these Indigenous nations. This crisis, however, provides an opportunity to reimagine a new energy economy that provides more benefits to more people. Currently,  42 percent  of the Navajo Nation remains unemployed, and nearly  40 percent  live in poverty. Nearly all the electricity produced at the NGS was exported off the Navajo Nation to Phoenix, Tucson, Las Vegas and Los Angeles. Many families on the Navajo Nation still have limited access to electricity and water. In fact, 75 percent of all U.S. homes without electricity are on the Navajo Nation. The transition from coal can and must address these inequities. Non-Native energy companies and investors need to step outside their comfort zones to partner with local homegrown companies to assist with redevelopment for communities suffering from the collapse of the coal industry. The Navajo Nation has embraced the new opportunities afforded by renewable energy to bring jobs to areas across the reservation rather than to just one powerplant and mine. Solar panels can be widely distributed, scaled to need, locally controlled and built and maintained by modestly capitalized companies with roots in neighborhoods, communities and tribes. Two homegrown renewable energy companies have sprung up on the Navajo Nation in the past several years. Native Renewables is a nonprofit focused on training Navajos to work in the solar industry and install off-grid solar systems for those currently without electricity. Navajo Power is a social benefit corporation focused on utility-scale solar development and is committed to investing profits into local community development projects to “maximize the economic benefits of clean energy for tribal and affected communities.” But these organizations can’t do it alone. Non-Native energy companies and investors need to step outside their comfort zones to partner with local homegrown companies to assist with redevelopment for communities suffering from the collapse of the coal industry. Arizona’s two largest electric utilities, Salt River Project (SRP) and Arizona Public Service (co-owners of the NGS), have stepped up to offer transition assistance. SRP offered replacement jobs to all NGS employees and provided retraining and relocation assistance. Several buildings at the power plant along with the coal railway were donated to the Navajo government. Both utilities offered additional educational and economic development assistance and promised to purchase renewable energy from the tribes to help jumpstart solar development on the reservations. Even with these commitments, more is needed. As the U.S. embraces ambitious renewable energy goals, we need local, state and national governments to step up to support job retraining programs and economic redevelopment efforts for those workers and communities affected by the decline of coal. In the case of NGS, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation donated its ownership of 500 megawatts of NGS transmission capacity to the Navajo Nation to help get tribal solar resources to market. Labor unions and trade associations have important roles to play in charting a just and sustainable transition from fossil fuels to renewables. Rather than trying to protect jobs that are doomed to disappear, unions can develop programs to educate and train workers for secure employment in the new energy economy and ensure good pay and benefits. Renewable energy and energy efficiency are the fastest-growing segment of the energy industry. There are already far more jobs in wind and solar than in fossil fuel-based electrical generation, even though wind and solar generated less than 15 percent of the nation’s energy in 2020.  Trade associations represent businesses with the capital and expertise to invest in infrastructure and manage the energy transition. To successfully adapt during this time of rapid change, business leaders must boldly experiment and innovate, embrace — not resist — change, and think broadly about the human dimensions of the energy transition rather than focusing just on technology and markets. Finally, we need to rethink how we do business in the 21st century. The concept of “return on investment” should be broadened well beyond revenue to shareholders. It should include returns to the energy system infrastructure to make it resilient in the face of climate change, returns to the workers that generate and distribute our electricity, returns to the communities supporting the energy economy, and investment in rural areas that have gained little of the nation’s prosperity. The fossil-fuel economy has taken wealth from everyone to pay for gasoline and electricity and concentrated it in a relatively small number of corporate coffers. It has been a generator of wealth inequality. Renewable energy, on the other hand, has the potential to reverse that trend. For the first time in over a century our energy needs can be partly supplied from the grassroots rather than the likes of Duke Energy and ExxonMobil — all while addressing the climate crisis and reducing our environmental impact on the planet. Let’s work together to build back better. Pull Quote Non-Native energy companies and investors need to step outside their comfort zones to partner with local homegrown companies to assist with redevelopment for communities suffering from the collapse of the coal industry. Contributors Paul Hirt Topics Energy & Climate Social Justice Renewable Energy Environmental Justice Indigenous People Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off A legacy power plant is demolished on Navajo Nation land. Courtesy of EcoFlight Close Authorship

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Urging clean energy and justice for tribal nations

Cargill fishes for innovations in sustainable salmon farming

April 1, 2021 by  
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Cargill fishes for innovations in sustainable salmon farming Jesse Klein Thu, 04/01/2021 – 00:05 Cargill’s new sustainability program, SeaFuther , expands its carbon reduction commitments from the terrestrial to the oceanic. The commitment focuses on Cargill’s aquaculture and aquaculture feed business, targeting a reduction in Scope 3 emissions of 30 percent by 2030, from a 2017 baseline.  As sustainable and environmentally friendly diets increase in popularity, the seafood market is projected to reach almost $200 billion by 2027. In 2019, it was recorded at a little under $160 billion, a projected compound annual growth rate of 2.5 percent. To keep up, the aquafeed market is projected to reach $80 billion by then, double the compound annual growth rate of seafood at 5.3 percent. As one of the largest aquafeed producers, Cargill is a key player in reducing emissions. Cargill’s program will start with salmon farmers mostly in Norway and Scotland. “Salmon is very efficient, from a carbon perspective, protein to begin with,” said Heather Tansey, sustainability lead for animal nutrition and health at Cargill. “And therefore feed is one of the biggest aspects of that overall footprint.” In 2018, salmon aquaculture peaked at 2.68 million metric tons of salmon produced globally and farmed salmon accounts for 74 percent of all salmon production. According to Tansey, feed represents 90 percent of salmon production’s environmental footprint. As a comparison, research indicates that feed only represents about 20 percent of overall carbon emissions for beef production. Inside its own aquaculture operations, Cargill is focusing on switching to feed ingredients that have less of a carbon footprint, Tansey said. The aquafeed division is focusing on increasing the percentage of fish trimmings used in its feed to 40 percent. Fish trimmings are the leftover pieces of fish from cutting fillets for human consumption.  While this is a great goal that should be championed, it is already a pretty common practice, according to Tyler Isaac, senior aquaculture scientist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch Program , a nonprofit leader in sustainable seafood.  “In salmon, I would be surprised if there were salmon feeds being produced now, with zero percent inclusions of byproduct ingredients,” Issac said. “In many cases, it simply makes economic sense. But it’s growing and continuing to expand, and we like to see that.” Cargill is focusing on switching to feed ingredients that have less of a carbon footprint. Focusing on novel, more sustainable ingredients is the next innovation in Cargill’s feed production journey. In 2019 , Cargill partnered with InnovaFeed, a startup focusing on bringing plant-based and insect proteins to animal and fish feeds. Cargill is funding a pilot program with InnovaFeed to bring insect protein fish food to a commercial level.  “We are working on scaling it,” Tansey said. “It’s a newer practice that we really want to invest in.” Other leaders in the aquafeed space are exploring alternative feeds as well. Archer-Daniels-Midland is hopping on the insect train with InnovaFeed and also working with Pancosma to create supplements that increase the availability of essential nutrients such as zinc and iron that are difficult to unlock in plant-based feeds. But switching to plant-based ingredients must be done carefully with broader sustainability practices in mind, Isaac said.  “Oftentimes, the carbon footprint of a plant-based ingredient [in fish feed] is related to something like deforestation,” he said. “Where if you cut down a part of the Amazon to grow soybeans, you lose the carbon sequestration potential of that rainforest.”  According to Tansey, Cargill’s sustainability team plans to work closely with its raw materials department to evaluate soy and wheat suppliers for regenerative farming practices and encourage or switch to farmers with more sustainable models. Looking past Cargill’s internal operations, the company also plans to work with and advise its aquaculture farming customers directly. Cargill wants to help salmon farmers increase their productivity by keeping the fish healthy with good nutrition.  “We create customized formulations that really help the farmers optimize their system,” Tansey said. “The salmon farmers are working in different conditions, they may have different stressors or different challenges that their farms are facing.”  Pull Quote Cargill is focusing on switching to feed ingredients that have less of a carbon footprint. Topics Food & Agriculture Fisheries Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Ninety percent of environmental footprint of salmon production comes from the feed. Cargill is investing in bringing that down. Shutterstock Andrey Armyagov Close Authorship

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Cargill fishes for innovations in sustainable salmon farming

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