Landscaping Techniques To Cut Home Energy Use

September 26, 2019 by  
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Nearly half of all home energy use is for heating … The post Landscaping Techniques To Cut Home Energy Use appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Landscaping Techniques To Cut Home Energy Use

Landscaping Techniques To Cut Home Energy Use

September 26, 2019 by  
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Nearly half of all home energy use is for heating … The post Landscaping Techniques To Cut Home Energy Use appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Landscaping Techniques To Cut Home Energy Use

One Bitcoin transaction takes more energy than a household uses in a week

November 13, 2017 by  
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Although Bitcoin has suffered a dramatic fall in value over the past several days, 2017 has seen Bitcoin’s value reach new heights. But with its increased value comes an increased strain on energy consumption. According to cryptocurrency analyst Alex de Vries, also known as Digiconomist , it would be profitable to use 24 terawatt-hours of electricity, about the equivalent annual energy consumption to Nigeria, a nation of 186 million, to “mine” Bitcoins each year. Even simple transactions with Bitcoin consume large amounts of energy; 215 kilowatt-hours (KWh), or enough electricity to power an American household for a week, are required to complete each of the roughly 300,000 Bitcoin transactions that occur each day. Bitcoins are created by “ mining ,” a process which involves running a powerful computing system so that it may solve complex cryptographic puzzles and produce a Bitcoin. The price of Bitcoin is proportional to the amount of electricity that can profitably be used to extract Bitcoin from a computing rig. When the price rises, miners must compensate by adding more powerful computing components, which then adds to the energy bill. Motherboard estimates that, at a minimum, the energy used by global Bitcoin extraction network at present could power 821,940 average American homes daily. Related: This Russian cottage is heated for free with Bitcoin mining What does this energy consumption mean for climate change and the environment? Using data available from a coal-powered Bitcoin mine in Mongolia , the Digiconomist determined that this single mine produces the emissions equivalent of 203,000 car kilometers traveled per hour of mining. When asked by Motherboard whether this energy problem might be fixed as the system matures, the Digiconomist responded that “Blockchain is inefficient tech by design, as we create trust by building a system based on distrust.” Bitcoin transactions are thousands of times less efficient than credit card transactions, by design. In the brave new world of Bitcoin, it seems that unless drastic changes are made, the cryptocurrency will continue to consume enormous amounts of energy. Via Motherboard Images via Depositphotos (1)

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One Bitcoin transaction takes more energy than a household uses in a week

How to Keep the Earth Day Momentum Going

April 25, 2017 by  
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How did you spend Earth Day? Perhaps you planted a tree, volunteered, reduced your energy use for the day, or all of the above and more. Mother Nature thanks you! But why stop saving the planet on April 23rd? In our eyes, every day should be Earth…

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How to Keep the Earth Day Momentum Going

David Doll, OSIsoft: Where IoT means MLB

April 14, 2017 by  
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The internet of things is allowing sports stadiums to measure their energy use, water use and waste in real time. It saved the Mariners $1.5 million.

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David Doll, OSIsoft: Where IoT means MLB

Levi’s, Method and Berkeley students on a safer chemical crusade

April 14, 2017 by  
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Why companies are turning to grad students for green chemistry R&D.

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Levi’s, Method and Berkeley students on a safer chemical crusade

How did Germany get its energy transition right?

October 24, 2016 by  
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Germany’s 40-year transition to high renewable energy use, from feed-in tariffs to community renewables — and what America can learn.

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How did Germany get its energy transition right?

Mars, WRI team up on science-based targets for climate, land, water

October 24, 2016 by  
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An inside look at a sustainability partnership in action.

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Mars, WRI team up on science-based targets for climate, land, water

Energy leaders advance at REM16, EPA Green Power Partner Awards

October 24, 2016 by  
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Big corporations are driving more and more clean energy purchases, as shown at the Renewable Energy Markets event.

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Energy leaders advance at REM16, EPA Green Power Partner Awards

Detailed flowchart shows the complete lifecycle of US energy use

August 16, 2016 by  
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San Francisco company Otherlab has created a massive interactive “ Energy Literacy ” flowchart that shows all of the energy used in America. The company debuted the chart at an event run by Reinvent , a company dedicated to bringing innovators together to address the world’s most pressing problems. Pulling data from the Department of Energy and other sources, the diagram is the first of its kind to depict the complete flow of energy throughout the US economy. While this was a massive undertaking, perhaps it’s not so surprising considering the source. Otherlab is run by serial entrepreneur and MacArthur genius Saul Griffith, who once famously calculated the carbon footprint of every single action in his life . When he presented the chart, he told his audience, “I think we may be the first three or four people to read every footnote in every energy agency document ever produced.” The left side of the diagram shows where our energy comes from – the majority from coal , less than 1 percent from solar . By highlighting a section, readers can track a single energy source to its various ends, seeing just how much energy ends up wasted along the way. For example: with natural gas the waste is substantial, with only half of the generated energy being used. Related: Americans used less energy in 2015, but more wind, solar, and geothermal power Some of the major uses of our energy should come as no surprise, such as that used for basic infrastructure. Other uses, like the energy used by US military jets, may raise questions readers didn’t even realize they had. By charting out the connections between all of these industries and our energy production, Griffith hopes it will be possible to better understand the economy and for policy decisions to be made with more accurate information. + Energy Literacy Via Co.Exist Images via Energy Literacy and Kevin Dooley

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Detailed flowchart shows the complete lifecycle of US energy use

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