Global renewable energy is projected to rise by 50% in the next 5 years, IEA finds

October 22, 2019 by  
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The International Energy Agency (IEA) recently released its Renewables 2019 market forecast, detailing analysis on renewable energy and technologies. In the report, industry trends show that the world’s total renewable-based power capacity will grow by 50% in 5 years, increasing by 1.2 terawatts. Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems shall account for 60% of that increase.   Established in 1974, under the Organization for Economic Development and Cooperation (OECD), the IEA is an intergovernmental organization that acts as a policy advisor to its 30 member countries on matters concerning reliable, affordable and clean energy . It was formed following the 1973 – 1974 oil crisis to help members respond to energy supply disruptions. Since then, the IEA’s mandate has expanded to include the promotion of sound energy policy and the fostering of multinational energy cooperation. Today, the IEA’s mission focuses on energy security, economic development, environmental awareness and worldwide engagement. Related:  Renewable energy surpasses fossil fuels in the UK Because of its eco-conscious stance for efficiency and for reduced impact on the environment , the IEA has been a strong proponent for renewable energy. Renewable energy, after all, helps in mitigating climate change and creating a more sustainable energy future. Solar , wind and hydropower projects have been rolling out at their fastest rate in recent years. And, they are projected to experience increased growth rates in years to come. “This is a pivotal time for renewable energy,” says Dr. Fatih Birol, the IEA’s Executive Director. “Technologies such as solar photovoltaics (PV) and wind are at the heart of transformations taking place across the global energy system. Their increasing deployment is crucial for efforts to tackle greenhouse gas emissions, reduce air pollution and expand energy access.” Three major challenges face the renewable energy sector, which are “policy and regulatory uncertainty, high investment risks and system integration of wind and solar PV,” the IEA report states. “Important policy and tariff reforms are needed to ensure that distributed PV’s growth is sustainable .” Cost reductions coupled with government policy efforts can drive growth in the renewable energy market, all of which can be fully aligned with the Paris Agreement’s goal of limiting global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius. The IEA’s forecast of the changing energy landscape means that utilities and infrastructure will likely need to adapt quickly, too. “Renewables are already the world’s second largest source of electricity ,” adds Birol. “But their deployment still needs to accelerate if we are to achieve long-term climate, air quality and energy access goals.” Via Reuters Image via Oimheidi

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Global renewable energy is projected to rise by 50% in the next 5 years, IEA finds

Earth911 Inspiration: You Can’t Talk Energy Without Addressing the Climate

August 23, 2019 by  
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Earth911 inspirations. Post them, share your desire to help people … The post Earth911 Inspiration: You Can’t Talk Energy Without Addressing the Climate appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Earth911 Inspiration: You Can’t Talk Energy Without Addressing the Climate

Electric Scooters: Dirty or Green Transportation?

August 23, 2019 by  
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The Power of Business Advocacy to Accelerate a Clean Economy

October 2, 2017 by  
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How does public policy determine clean economy business outcomes?  Why is it imperative for business leaders to leverage their market power to truly accelerate clean energy, climate and sustainability innovations at the policymaking level — especially under this challenging federal administration? A Congressman, Google’s head of energy policy and market development, and a former White House Chief Sustainability Officer turned renewable energy finance entrepreneur share their stories and insights on the way forward.

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The Power of Business Advocacy to Accelerate a Clean Economy

Trump’s DOE invests $62 million in concentrated solar power

September 15, 2017 by  
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President Donald Trump doesn’t usually mention solar power , unless it’s talk of covering his beloved border wall in solar panels . But his Department of Energy (DOE) recently announced a huge investment in concentrated solar power (CSP). Recently, the solar industry  reached the 2020 SunShot Initiative utility-scale solar cost goal, so the DOE is now looking into new priorities for investment. The DOE recently issued a press release stating they’ll invest up to $82 million in research: $62 million for CSP and $20 million in power electronics technologies, focusing on new technologies now that the average price for utility-scale solar is now six cents per kilowatt-hour. The MIT Technology Review suggested DOE officials think CSP could enhance grid stability more in the long term since CSP plants can store some power as heat, allowing them to keep producing electricity when there’s no sunshine. Related: Dubai to build the world’s biggest concentrated solar power plant But the energy CSP plants generate has been costlier than photovoltaics . And according to the MIT Technology Review, some people are suspicious the DOE may move to weaken support for photovoltaics. The Trump administration’s 2018 budget proposal slashed funding for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by almost 70 percent. That’s the same office that manages the SunShot Initiative. The DOE also announced a $50 million funding opportunity for large-scale pilot fossil fuel projects in late August. But CSP’s ability to store power is a strong advantage. Energy policy researcher David Victor of the University of California, San Diego did say investing in CSP makes sense, telling MIT Technology Review, “My general impression is that we have relatively over-invested in photovoltaics and under-invested in [concentrated solar].” Dan Reicher, executive director at Stanford University’s Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance, told MIT Technology Review, “[Concentrated solar power] today hasn’t been able to compete with photovoltaics, but there are some promising research areas. Given the climate challenge, we need to put eggs in many, many zero-carbon baskets.” Via MIT Technology Review and the Department of Energy Images via Bureau of Land Management on Flickr and Wikimedia Commons

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Trump’s DOE invests $62 million in concentrated solar power

South Korea to throw out any plans for new nuclear reactors

June 20, 2017 by  
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South Korea currently obtains around 30 percent of its energy from nuclear power , but with the election of a new president the country seems ready to shift away from that energy source to something a bit safer. President Moon Jae-In – who campaigned on a platform of phasing out nuclear energy – says he will toss out plans to build new reactors and won’t extend the lifespan of existing ones in the country. The 2011 Fukushima disaster in nearby Japan incited concern in South Korea, as many of the country’s nuclear plants were then getting old. According to the country’s new president, many of the plants are located dangerously near residential areas. He said a nuclear meltdown could result in unimaginable consequences. Add to that corruption scandals over state nuclear energy agencies during the last few years and public unease over several earthquakes in South Korea in 2016, since an earthquake sparked the Fukushima meltdown. Related: Finland’s Green Party says humanity must embrace nuclear power Moon echoed these fears when he said, “South Korea is not safe from the risk of earthquake, and a nuclear accident caused by a quake can have such a devastating impact.” South Korea is running 25 nuclear reactors right now. Many of them will expire between 2020 and 2030, leaving the decision to extend several of them or not in Moon’s hands during his 2017 to 2022 term. He campaigned on the idea of shutting down every single one – although that task could take decades. As he decommissioned the Kori-1, South Korea’s first nuclear reactor, Moon said in a speech, “We will dump our atomic-centric power supply and open the door to the post-nuclear era.” He’d like to move towards what he described as more environmentally-friendly and safer energy sources like solar power and wind power . He’s also pledged to promote a post-coal energy policy . During his campaign he said he’d abandon coal to help curb air pollution . Among the member nations of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), South Korea is home to the highest levels of small air particles. The country currently obtains around 40 percent of power from coal. Via Phys.org Images via IAEA Imagebank on Flickr and Wikimedia Commons

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Rick Perry confirmed as Energy Secretary

March 3, 2017 by  
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With bitter battles over the confirmations of Scott Pruitt as Environmental Protection Agency administrator or Jeff Sessions as Attorney General, perhaps it shouldn’t come as a surprise the Senate confirmed the slightly less controversial Rick Perry . In a 62 to 37 vote, the former Texas governor slid right into his new role as Energy Secretary. He’ll oversee energy policy , 17 national laboratories, and the United States’ arsenal of nuclear weapons . Perry’s views have come a long way from those he touted during his failed campaigns for president, or so it appears. During his 2012 campaign, he called for the elimination of the Department of Energy , but could not remember the department’s name in a debate. During his recent confirmation hearing, he said he regretted that proposal. Related: Rick Perry tapped to run the Department of Energy – which he once promised to shut down According to The New York Times, people close to Perry said he once thought the Energy Department centered around promoting and developing America’s energy resources – a weighty task in its own right, but it was only after the former governor heard about the agency’s other functions he changed his tune. During his confirmation hearing he said after “being briefed on so many of the vital functions of the Department of Energy,” he now supports its goals. For many years Perry showed complete disdain for the science of climate change , but the Energy Department does deal with the issue through research into energy technologies. It appears Perry has changed his mind on that too. He told senators, “I believe the climate is changing. I believe some of it is naturally occurring, but some of it is also caused by man-made activity.” Some of that man-made activity can be linked to oil and gas companies, such as Energy Transfer Partners , where Perry once sat on the board. To his credit, he did resign from the company building the Dakota Access Pipeline after his appointment, according to The Texas Tribune . During his confirmation hearing he also made a poorly phrased but promising claim: “I am going to protect all of the science, whether it’s related to the climate or other aspects of what we’re going to be doing. I am going to protect the men and women of the scientific community from anyone that would attack them, no matter what their reason may be, at the Department of Energy.” Via The New York Times Images via Gage Skidmore on Flickr and Wikimedia Commons

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Rick Perry confirmed as Energy Secretary

Massachusetts lawmakers sponsor 100% renewable energy bill

February 15, 2017 by  
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Massachusetts could become the first state in America to be powered entirely by renewable energy . Lawmakers recently introduced a bill that would require an economy-wide transition to obtaining power via clean sources like wind and solar, and 53 state legislators from both the House and the Senate have shown support for the measure. The bill, SD. 1932 , also known as the 100 Percent Renewable Energy Act, would set targets of electricity generation via 100 percent renewables by 2035; other sectors like transportation and heating would have until 2050 to make the switch. Over a quarter of legislature members in Massachusetts have now cosponsored the bill, which has been promoted by environmental advocacy group Environment Massachusetts . The organization’s state director Ben Hellerstein said in a statement, “Now is the time for Massachusetts to go big on clean energy . Getting to 100 percent renewable energy is 100 percent possible – and it’s 100 percent necessary.” Related: San Diego to become largest U.S. city to run on 100% renewable energy State Senator Jamie Eldridge, one of three legislators who first filed the bill, pointed out that even if the Trump administration refuses to act on climate change , states can wage their own war. He said in a statement, “Massachusetts has been a leader on alternative energy policy for over a decade, and now with federal assaults on efforts to combat climate change, it will be up to individual states to protect the environmental and health interests of the public.” The bill would launch a Clean Energy Workforce Development Fund to provide employment in renewable technologies; part of the fund would go towards shifting fossil fuel workers into clean fuel jobs . SD. 1932 would also complement Massachusetts’ 2008 Global Warming Solutions Act, which calls for the state to lower carbon emissions by 80 percent under 1990 levels by 2050. The bill’s not law yet, but with so much support from Massachusetts lawmakers, a 100 percent clean energy commitment appears promising. Via Environment Massachusetts Images via Doc Searles on Flickr and Wikimedia Commons

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What Trump’s victory means for the environment (it’s not good)

November 9, 2016 by  
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In a shocking upset that has warped our perception of reality, climate change denier Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential race. The newly elected 45th President of the United States has indicated he’ll work to reverse the progress made in the battle against climate change. From pulling out of the Paris climate agreement to promoting fossil fuels to limiting the power of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to undoing President Obama’s work on the Clean Power Plan , Donald Trump’s proposed energy policies may gravely impact the environment. Mere days after the Paris climate agreement went into force, the United States elected an individual who has been on a rampage to jerk the United States out of the historic agreement. The Paris climate agreement was 20 years in the making, and offers a starting point for nations to attempt to alleviate the effects of climate change as people from island nations to Florida are already grappling with climate change-caused sea level rise . Trump has said he’ll yank America out of the agreement, but French environment minister Ségolène Royale said it won’t be so easy for Trump to follow through. She told The Guardian the Paris agreement “prohibits any exit for a period of three years, plus a year-long notice period, so there will be four stable years.” Related: Would a Trump presidency undo the UN climate change agreement? While that statement may provide a sigh of relief for many Americans, Trump will likely also work against progress at home. He said during his campaign he will cancel ” billions in climate change spending ,” putting that money towards “clean water, clean air, and safety.” But his proposed appointment of fellow climate change denier Myron Ebell of the Competitive Enterprise Institute to head an EPA ” transition team ” signals Trump likely wants to undo many of President Obama’s climate policies. For example, under his new limited EPA, government might not strongly enforce Clean Air Act regulations. In terms of energy, Trump’s plans are dirty. He has said we need ” much more than wind and solar ,” pointing instead to something called clean coal. He’s said he wants to tap into American shale gas and even build the Keystone XL pipeline . He supports fracking and regular old coal. As so many of the lines that come from Trump’s mouth are lies, will he follow through on his threats or will he actually work to move the country forward? Either way, he is likely to have the support of a Republican-dominated House and Senate. President Obama was able to pass many clean energy measures by utilizing executive powers, but now Trump will obtain those powers. Time will show how he chooses to use them. Via Grist and The Guardian Images via Gage Skidmore on Flickr ( 1 , 2 )

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What Trump’s victory means for the environment (it’s not good)

Visitors become hour hands in this temporary museum for luxury watchmaker Piguet

November 9, 2016 by  
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The architectural installation , which Mathieu Lehanneur refers to as The Ring, is nestled within the Yuz Museum of Contemporary Art in Shanghai . Exploring both the rich history of the Audemars Piguet brand and Lehanneur’s interest in combining nature and technology, the Ring aims to be emotionally engaging and informative. Its monolithic exterior is elegant and simple, while the interior is reminscent of the intricate inner mechanisms of Piguet watches. Related: Superstudio Più’s Temporary Museum Leaves a Permanent Impression at Milan Design Week The main entrance leads visitors to 12 open doors, separated by lush green walls, that evoke the hours of a watch dial. This layout converts visitors into imaginary needles that mark the different moments in the brand’s history and its technical innovation. Mathieu Lehanneur said, “This temporary museum is a reflection on time… a dreamy vision of time where each instant differs from the previous one. Here every door opens onto a new story.” + Mathieu Lehanneur

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Visitors become hour hands in this temporary museum for luxury watchmaker Piguet

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