Hundreds of dead sharks wash up on the shores of the Persian Gulf

December 20, 2017 by  
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Officials in Iran came across a gruesome sight this week: hundreds of dead sharks washed up on shore . The cause isn’t some natural phenomenon – hunters have been illegally capturing the sharks, sawing off the fins and tossing them back into the water, where they got caught up in currents and eventually wound up on land. Hossein Delshab, an official in the city of Bushehr, told a local news agency that hundreds of dead sharks had recently washed up on the shores of Shif island, raising “an alarm about the extinction of sharks” in the area. Related: 512-year-old Greenland shark may be the oldest living vertebrate on Earth Although shark fishing has been banned in the area since 2014, high demand for their prized fins has made hunting them worth the possible fine if the poachers are caught. Violators can be fined up to $7,000. But because it is believed that shark fin can help with sexual disorders, they are a popular item in local markets. Via BBC Images via Wikipedia and Deposit Photos ( 1 , 2 )

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Hundreds of dead sharks wash up on the shores of the Persian Gulf

World’s last male northern white rhino joins Tinder to avoid extinction

April 27, 2017 by  
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He may not make the coziest of bedfellows, but if a northern white rhino pops up on your Tinder screen, it might behoove you to swipe right. Dubbed by wildlife experts as the “world’s most eligible bachelor,” 43-year-old Sudan is the sole remaining male of his kind. “I don’t mean to be too forward, but the fate of the species literally depends on me,” the rhino’s profile reads on the dating app. “I perform well under pressure.” Sudan isn’t looking to make a love connection, however. There are only two remaining female northern white rhinos left, and neither are viable candidates for mating. To stave off the subspecies’s extinction, Ol Pejeta Conservancy , the Kenyan wildlife group in charge of Sudan’s care is hoping to raise $9 million for research into breeding methods such as in-vitro fertilization. Related: 21 rare one-horned Indian rhinos drown in monsoon flooding Tinder users who swipe right will be directed to a donation site where they can dig deep for the cause. “We partnered with Ol Pejeta Conservancy to give the most eligible bachelor in the world a chance to meet his match,” Matt David, head of communications and marketing at Tinder, said in a statement. “We are optimistic given Sudan’s profile will be seen on Tinder in 190 countries and over 40 languages.” Sudan lives under round-the-clock protection at Old Pejeta with the two females, Najin and Fatu. “The plight that currently faces the northern white rhinos is a signal to the impact that humankind is having on many thousands of other species across the planet,” said Richard Vigne, the conservancy’s CEO. “Ultimately, the aim will be to reintroduce a viable population of northern white rhino back into the wild, which is where their true value will be realized.” Via Time Photos by Unsplash

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World’s last male northern white rhino joins Tinder to avoid extinction

The endangered animal trade is taking off on Facebook

March 7, 2016 by  
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In Malaysia, you can purchase a pet gibbon, otter, slow loris, or even a bear without ever leaving the comfort of your own home , thanks to the explosion of exotic animal trading groups on Facebook. The issue was highlighted recently in a new report by the global wildlife trade monitoring network Traffic . Read the rest of The endangered animal trade is taking off on Facebook

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Tell Donald Trump to stop encouraging his sons to hunt rare wild animals

January 29, 2016 by  
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Donald Trump is many things. He’s a billionaire, a staunch conservative, the target of many bad hair jokes and, in case you missed it somehow, he’s also running for President of the United States. Trump is also the father of five children: three sons and two daughters. Last summer, Trump went on record defending his two eldest sons, Donald Jr. (Don) and Eric, who are big game hunters. When the public learned about the sons’ penchant for killing, the elder Trump defended and complimented his sons. Now, thousands are calling on the presidential candidate to change his tune. SIGN THIS PETITION > Read the rest of Tell Donald Trump to stop encouraging his sons to hunt rare wild animals

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INFOGRAPHIC: The endangered animals of Latin American and how you can help

January 15, 2016 by  
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Hunting , poaching , industrialization and other eco-threatening human activities are proceeding at a pace that nature can’t sustain. According to conservationists, many animal species are unable to adapt fast enough to survive the dramatic changes of their habitat and climate that result from human activity. Consider the sloths of Central and South America, which move on average only 40 yards per day and sleep for 15 to 20 hours per day. Such ingrained biological habits leave them with virtually no chance of adapting to the rapid pace of industrial deforestation. Cox & Kings created this extraordinary infographic that identifies the most popular endangered species in Latin America in hopes to bring more awareness to the dangers they face. Hunting, pollution, global warming, urbanization, and agriculture are among the many man-made factors responsible for the large-scale destruction of natural animal habitats. According to the World Wildlife Fund, habitat loss is the greatest threat to biodiversity on this planet today. The impact of habitat destruction can trigger a wave of destructive forces. For example, the howler monkey—found in the tropical regions of Central and South America—is threatened by its inability to find food as a result of deforestation. When its food supply is threatened, the howler monkey is less likely to reproduce, thus compounding the threat to the health of its population. Deforestation, in particular, is a devastating driver of habitat loss. Half of the world’s original forests are already gone, and they continue to be removed at a rate 10x faster than they can be regrown. The impacts of human behavior are not felt only by the creatures of the land. There are currently only 8,000 nesting Hawksbill sea turtles left in the wilderness, many of whom inhabit the waters surrounding Costa Rica and other Latin American territories. The hawksbill and other sea turtles are facing extinction due to man-made climate change and human interference with its nesting sites and food sources. In addition to contributing to and volunteering for the many worthy conservationist organizations, you can also do your part by learning more about the animals that are currently threatened, where and how they live, and how they contribute to their respective ecosystems. + Cox and King

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INFOGRAPHIC: The endangered animals of Latin American and how you can help

INFOGRAPHIC: The endangered animals of Latin America and how you can help

January 15, 2016 by  
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Hunting , poaching , industrialization and other eco-threatening human activities are proceeding at a pace that nature can’t sustain. According to conservationists, many animal species are unable to adapt fast enough to survive the dramatic changes of their habitat and climate that result from human activity. Consider the sloths of Central and South America, which move on average only 40 yards per day and sleep for 15 to 20 hours per day. Such ingrained biological habits leave them with virtually no chance of adapting to the rapid pace of industrial deforestation. Cox & Kings created this extraordinary infographic that identifies the most popular endangered species in Latin America in hopes to bring more awareness to the dangers they face. Hunting, pollution, global warming, urbanization, and agriculture are among the many man-made factors responsible for the large-scale destruction of natural animal habitats. According to the World Wildlife Fund, habitat loss is the greatest threat to biodiversity on this planet today. The impact of habitat destruction can trigger a wave of destructive forces. For example, the howler monkey—found in the tropical regions of Central and South America—is threatened by its inability to find food as a result of deforestation. When its food supply is threatened, the howler monkey is less likely to reproduce, thus compounding the threat to the health of its population. Deforestation, in particular, is a devastating driver of habitat loss. Half of the world’s original forests are already gone, and they continue to be removed at a rate 10x faster than they can be regrown. The impacts of human behavior are not felt only by the creatures of the land. There are currently only 8,000 nesting Hawksbill sea turtles left in the wilderness, many of whom inhabit the waters surrounding Costa Rica and other Latin American territories. The hawksbill and other sea turtles are facing extinction due to man-made climate change and human interference with its nesting sites and food sources. In addition to contributing to and volunteering for the many worthy conservationist organizations, you can also do your part by learning more about the animals that are currently threatened, where and how they live, and how they contribute to their respective ecosystems. + Cox and King

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Airbus starts 3D-printing airplane parts in collaboration with Autodesk, APWorks and The Living

January 15, 2016 by  
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Sculptural new UC Berkeley museum and film archive opens this month

January 15, 2016 by  
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Tim Peake becomes the first British atronaut to go on a spacewalk

January 15, 2016 by  
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Major Tim Peake will make history today when he steps out of the International Space Station and becomes the first British astronaut to go on a spacewalk . Peake will venture out with NASA ’s Colonel Tim Kopra on a carefully choreographed spacewalk to repair a broken power unit. The two will wear pressurized suits, sip water from pouches, and flex their bladders of steel during the repair mission outside the space station, which is scheduled to last for six and a half hours with no bathroom breaks. Read the rest of Tim Peake becomes the first British atronaut to go on a spacewalk

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Tim Peake becomes the first British atronaut to go on a spacewalk

South African court lifts ban on selling rhino horn

November 30, 2015 by  
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In a shocking decision handed down late last week, a panel of three South African judges struck down the country’s ban on trading rhino horn . Two of the country’s largest rhino farmers, upset that they couldn’t profit from the sale of their herds’ horns, challenged the 2009 ban on the grounds that it had been imposed on the country without any public input. Read the rest of South African court lifts ban on selling rhino horn

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