South Korea to build a peace trail along the DMZ

May 2, 2019 by  
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South Korea is making big changes to the Korean Peninsula’s Demilitarized Zone (DMZ). The country just voted in a plan that will build a peace trail along the DMZ in honor of the Panmunjom Declaration, which was signed in April of last year by President Moon Jae-in and North Korea’s Kim Jong Un. The first phase of the project will feature a hiking trail in the Gangwaon Province, located near the east side of Korea. Tourists will be able to explore the Unification Observatory and hike alongside barbed wire fences that divide the Korean Peninsula. Officials on both sides are guaranteeing the safety of all guests who hike along the trail. Related: China closes Mount Everest base camp after overwhelming trash problem reports “United Nations Command and the ROK [South Korea] government have demonstrated superb teamwork, collaboration, and coordination throughout the entire ‘peace trail’ process and will continue to do so,” Gen. Robert Abrams of the United Nations explained. The DMZ spreads out over 160 miles and is located around 30 miles outside of Seoul. The area was first established in the wake of the Korean War and is part of the Korean War Armistice Agreement. For the past 60 years, the DMZ has been strictly off limits to visitors and was protected by landmines and fences. Due to the severe restrictions enforced, the DMZ has become a place where endangered animals have thrived. In fact, several endangered species have been spotted in the area, including white-naped cranes, red-crowned cranes, musk deer, mandarin ducks and mountain goats. There have even been a few sightings of the Amur leopard, which is currently listed as critically endangered. With the hiking trails set to open, environmentalists hope to preserve the delicate ecosystem while giving people the opportunity to explore the zone on their own. In light of the abundance of wildlife , conservationists have been working hard to enact legislation that will help preserve the DMZ for future generations. The only issue is that both North Korea and South Korea will have to come together to finalize the arrangement, but can perhaps use the situation as a way to reconcile past differences. The peace trail is the first step in bridging the gap between the two governments and will hopefully lead to further conservation efforts along the DMZ. Via CNN Image via Shutterstock

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South Korea to build a peace trail along the DMZ

Can’t make the climate strikes? Here are a few tips on how students can live sustainably

May 2, 2019 by  
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More than ever, students are leading the charge in promoting sustainable living . Protesting is an effective method of getting the attention of lawmakers, but there are other things you can do to improve the environment outside of a picket line. From volunteering for a local clean-up effort to saying goodbye to single-use plastics, here is a quick guide on how students can incorporate sustainable living practices into their daily routine. Avoid Single-Use Plastics Going in and out of classes all day can make finding quality food difficult. Purchasing food on the go is a common way to deal with the everyday bustle of student life, but it usually results in large amounts of plastic waste . Related: How to teach children about climate change You can avoid contributing to the growing problem of plastic pollution by bringing your own food containers to class. That way, if you need to take the food with you then you have a reusable container on hand. Alternatively, you can also prepare your meals at home, which is better for the environment and your wallet. For shopping at the grocery store, you should consider investing in reusable bags. If you do not have room in your budget, you can always reuse old bags until they are no longer viable. Sustainable Dorm Supplies Purchasing eco-friendly products helps prevent harmful chemicals from entering our oceans and waterways. For the bathroom, look for toilet paper that is made from recycled materials and is bleach-free. You should also avoid body wash that contains microbeads, as they often pass through treatment plants unfiltered and end up in the water supply. When it comes to cleaners, look for natural products that do not feature harmful chemicals. These chemicals enter the waterways and can have devastating effects on marine wildlife . Volunteering If you cannot make it to a nearby protest, get in contact with a local environmental group and donate some of your time to their cause. There are plenty of green organizations throughout the country that will welcome you with open arms. Many of these organizations will work with students to promote sustainability in the education system and the experience is great to put on your resume. Many of these groups also organize large clean-up projects throughout the community. Not only does this have a positive effect on the environment , but it also enables you to get out and enjoy the outdoors. Some clean-up ideas include beach projects and waste removal along roadways. Recycling Recycling is one of the easiest ways you can contribute to a better environment. As a student, there are many things you can recycle throughout the school year. This includes most plastic items you encounter and all of your paper products. Your college should have at least one recycling bin on campus. If you cannot find one, contact the administration office and talk to them about installing one. Related: Go green in your bedroom with these sustainable decor picks Green Transportation Vehicle emissions are a growing problem in cities around the world. You can do your part in helping to curb air pollution by finding alternative ways to school. This includes getting involved in a ride-sharing program or taking your local bus to class. If you live on campus, consider using a bike to get around or walk when the weather is nice. Walking or biking is a great way to get in a quick workout and can help you save money in the long run. If you have to call an Uber or Lyft, consider selecting a vehicle that has low emissions . Paper Savings Computers may be taking over the world, but many college students still rely on paper for note-taking and homework assignments. Apart from recycling, make the most of your paper stock by writing on both sides when taking notes. You should also avoid making excess copies and always double check your work for errors before taking it to the printer. For best practices, consider using refillable binders instead of traditional notebooks. You should also be aware of excess paper use in other areas of your life. In the cafeteria, for instance, only take as many napkins as you need instead of large handfuls. Donating If you do not have a lot of time on your hands for volunteering or protesting, donating is a great way to participate in sustainable living. Local charities would love your monetary support, but there are other things you can donate as well. This includes giving away old clothes, furniture, computers, cell phones and even dishes. If you do have some extra cash to spare, keep track of every dollar you donate. When tax season comes around, you can deduct charitable donations, which will boost your tax return. While it does take some effort to practice sustainable living, doing so is critical if we want to preserve the environment for generations to come. Via  Eco Nation ,  Princeton Review Images via Shutterstock

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Can’t make the climate strikes? Here are a few tips on how students can live sustainably

Don’t forget to fight for these "less glamorous" endangered species

February 20, 2019 by  
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Not all endangered animals have their own PR firms to save them. Many are living humble lives outside the limelight. A new poster campaign, commissioned by NetCredit, aims to draw attention to these underdogs in the conservation movement. According to Luke Doyle, who worked on the campaign, “The research team gathered data from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to build a long list of species that are flagged as ‘endangered’ or ‘threatened’ in every state of the U.S. The team then shortlisted the top populations at risk of extinction in each state, making sure that there were no duplicated species , as in some cases, certain states are home to the same populations. When finding a species that had been shortlisted already but was repeated in two or more states, we moved forward with the next domestic species on the list for the state we were working on.” Related: These are the most endangered species in the world Here’s an assortment of these endangered and threatened animals from different regions of the US. See the full list of endangered animals in every state here . Arkansas: ivory-billed woodpecker Logging decimated the home of the ivory-billed woodpecker, which was first reported extinct in 1944. However, occasional reported sightings give hope that a small population still lives on. California: Point Arena mountain beaver This primitive rodent is called a “living fossil.” They live underground, surfacing to eat stinging nestles and thistles. Agriculture , roads and recreational use of land threaten what’s left of their habitat. Illinois: cave amphipod An Illinois original, this gray amphipod lives in cold water, shunning light. Extremely sensitive, this little crustacean is very susceptible to pesticides and other human-made chemicals. Scientists are working to restore the population by 2023. Indiana: Indiana bat Pollution and commercial caving threaten the Indiana bat, endangered since 1967. More recently, white-nose syndrome has killed many more while they hibernate in limestone caves. Louisiana: Louisiana pine snake As pine forests are logged, this point-nosed snake loses its habitat. The Louisiana pine snake is non-venomous and grows up to a meter and a half long. Conservationists estimate their population at a few thousand. Missouri: Ozark hellbender This curved salamander can live up to 50 years — if they can survive poaching, contaminated water and habitat loss. They hang out under rocks during the day, breathing through their skin. At night, they hunt insects and crayfish. New Jersey: Sei whale This mysterious 60-foot baleen whale likes the deep water far from coastlines. Until commercial whaling ended in 1987, the Sei whale was fair game. They’re seldom seen, but still occasionally get caught in fishing gear. Related: Ghost gear is haunting our oceans North Carolina: Carolina northern flying squirrel Only found in North Carolina, southwest Virginia and Tennessee, this ice-age flying squirrel is struggling to survive pollution and climate change . Pennsylvania: short-eared owl These owls nest in grassy areas, such as around the Philadelphia Airport. Developers and agricultural practices threaten their remaining nesting places. South Dakota: black-footed ferret The only ferret native to North America, fewer than 500 are left in South Dakota. These members of the weasel family rely on prairie dogs for food — and prairie dog populations are also decreasing. Via NetCredit Images via NetCredit and Ryan Moehring of USFWS

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Don’t forget to fight for these "less glamorous" endangered species

These are the most endangered species in the world

January 14, 2019 by  
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As 2018 ended, it brought to light the reality that some  animals — after existing on Earth for millions of years — are gone for good. At the end of last year, scientists announced that three bird species went extinct, and there are even more species that could vanish in 2019. Unlike past mass extinctions , which were the result of things like asteroid strikes and volcanic eruptions, the current crisis is mostly caused by human activities. The Earth is currently losing animal species at 1,000 to 10,000 times the natural rate, meaning we could see 30 to 50 percent of the planet’s species going extinct by 2050. Related: 10 species at risk of extinction under the Trump administration According to the Center for Biological Diversity , we are in the middle of the planet’s sixth mass extinction of plants and animals, and this latest wave of species die-offs is the worst we have experienced since the loss of dinosaurs 65 million years ago. “Our results confirm that there is a growing wave of extinctions sweeping across the continents, driven mainly by habitat loss and degradation from unsustainable agriculture and logging,” Birdlife chief scientist Stuart Butchart told USA Today . We have an abundance of animals that help the world’s ecosystems thrive, but what will happen when more animals become endangered and go extinct? Eco2 Greetings has created an interactive map that highlights the animals that have recently become endangered and critically endangered, and it also shows where their natural habitats are based. The world’s most critically endangered species include Vaquita (population 30), Javan Rhino (63), Sumatran Rhino (80), Amur Leopard (84), Cross River Gorilla (250), Malayan Tiger (295), Sumatran Tiger (400), Mountain Gorilla (880), Yangtze Finless Porpoise (950) and Sumatran Elephant (2,600). The world’s most endangered species are North Atlantic Right Whale (325), Indochinese Tiger (350), Black-footed Ferret (370), Amur Tiger (540), Borneo Pygmy Elephant (1,500), Ganges River Dolphin (1,500), Indus River Dolphin (1,816), Galapagos Penguin (2,000), Bengal Tiger (2,500) and Sri Lankan Elephant (3,250). The existence of these animals is in our hands. So now the question is what can we do to boost these numbers and save these species? + Eco2 Greetings Image via Bernie Catterall

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Hundreds of dead sharks wash up on the shores of the Persian Gulf

December 20, 2017 by  
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Officials in Iran came across a gruesome sight this week: hundreds of dead sharks washed up on shore . The cause isn’t some natural phenomenon – hunters have been illegally capturing the sharks, sawing off the fins and tossing them back into the water, where they got caught up in currents and eventually wound up on land. Hossein Delshab, an official in the city of Bushehr, told a local news agency that hundreds of dead sharks had recently washed up on the shores of Shif island, raising “an alarm about the extinction of sharks” in the area. Related: 512-year-old Greenland shark may be the oldest living vertebrate on Earth Although shark fishing has been banned in the area since 2014, high demand for their prized fins has made hunting them worth the possible fine if the poachers are caught. Violators can be fined up to $7,000. But because it is believed that shark fin can help with sexual disorders, they are a popular item in local markets. Via BBC Images via Wikipedia and Deposit Photos ( 1 , 2 )

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Hundreds of dead sharks wash up on the shores of the Persian Gulf

World’s last male northern white rhino joins Tinder to avoid extinction

April 27, 2017 by  
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He may not make the coziest of bedfellows, but if a northern white rhino pops up on your Tinder screen, it might behoove you to swipe right. Dubbed by wildlife experts as the “world’s most eligible bachelor,” 43-year-old Sudan is the sole remaining male of his kind. “I don’t mean to be too forward, but the fate of the species literally depends on me,” the rhino’s profile reads on the dating app. “I perform well under pressure.” Sudan isn’t looking to make a love connection, however. There are only two remaining female northern white rhinos left, and neither are viable candidates for mating. To stave off the subspecies’s extinction, Ol Pejeta Conservancy , the Kenyan wildlife group in charge of Sudan’s care is hoping to raise $9 million for research into breeding methods such as in-vitro fertilization. Related: 21 rare one-horned Indian rhinos drown in monsoon flooding Tinder users who swipe right will be directed to a donation site where they can dig deep for the cause. “We partnered with Ol Pejeta Conservancy to give the most eligible bachelor in the world a chance to meet his match,” Matt David, head of communications and marketing at Tinder, said in a statement. “We are optimistic given Sudan’s profile will be seen on Tinder in 190 countries and over 40 languages.” Sudan lives under round-the-clock protection at Old Pejeta with the two females, Najin and Fatu. “The plight that currently faces the northern white rhinos is a signal to the impact that humankind is having on many thousands of other species across the planet,” said Richard Vigne, the conservancy’s CEO. “Ultimately, the aim will be to reintroduce a viable population of northern white rhino back into the wild, which is where their true value will be realized.” Via Time Photos by Unsplash

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World’s last male northern white rhino joins Tinder to avoid extinction

The endangered animal trade is taking off on Facebook

March 7, 2016 by  
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In Malaysia, you can purchase a pet gibbon, otter, slow loris, or even a bear without ever leaving the comfort of your own home , thanks to the explosion of exotic animal trading groups on Facebook. The issue was highlighted recently in a new report by the global wildlife trade monitoring network Traffic . Read the rest of The endangered animal trade is taking off on Facebook

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Tell Donald Trump to stop encouraging his sons to hunt rare wild animals

January 29, 2016 by  
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Donald Trump is many things. He’s a billionaire, a staunch conservative, the target of many bad hair jokes and, in case you missed it somehow, he’s also running for President of the United States. Trump is also the father of five children: three sons and two daughters. Last summer, Trump went on record defending his two eldest sons, Donald Jr. (Don) and Eric, who are big game hunters. When the public learned about the sons’ penchant for killing, the elder Trump defended and complimented his sons. Now, thousands are calling on the presidential candidate to change his tune. SIGN THIS PETITION > Read the rest of Tell Donald Trump to stop encouraging his sons to hunt rare wild animals

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INFOGRAPHIC: The endangered animals of Latin American and how you can help

January 15, 2016 by  
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Hunting , poaching , industrialization and other eco-threatening human activities are proceeding at a pace that nature can’t sustain. According to conservationists, many animal species are unable to adapt fast enough to survive the dramatic changes of their habitat and climate that result from human activity. Consider the sloths of Central and South America, which move on average only 40 yards per day and sleep for 15 to 20 hours per day. Such ingrained biological habits leave them with virtually no chance of adapting to the rapid pace of industrial deforestation. Cox & Kings created this extraordinary infographic that identifies the most popular endangered species in Latin America in hopes to bring more awareness to the dangers they face. Hunting, pollution, global warming, urbanization, and agriculture are among the many man-made factors responsible for the large-scale destruction of natural animal habitats. According to the World Wildlife Fund, habitat loss is the greatest threat to biodiversity on this planet today. The impact of habitat destruction can trigger a wave of destructive forces. For example, the howler monkey—found in the tropical regions of Central and South America—is threatened by its inability to find food as a result of deforestation. When its food supply is threatened, the howler monkey is less likely to reproduce, thus compounding the threat to the health of its population. Deforestation, in particular, is a devastating driver of habitat loss. Half of the world’s original forests are already gone, and they continue to be removed at a rate 10x faster than they can be regrown. The impacts of human behavior are not felt only by the creatures of the land. There are currently only 8,000 nesting Hawksbill sea turtles left in the wilderness, many of whom inhabit the waters surrounding Costa Rica and other Latin American territories. The hawksbill and other sea turtles are facing extinction due to man-made climate change and human interference with its nesting sites and food sources. In addition to contributing to and volunteering for the many worthy conservationist organizations, you can also do your part by learning more about the animals that are currently threatened, where and how they live, and how they contribute to their respective ecosystems. + Cox and King

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INFOGRAPHIC: The endangered animals of Latin American and how you can help

INFOGRAPHIC: The endangered animals of Latin America and how you can help

January 15, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

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Hunting , poaching , industrialization and other eco-threatening human activities are proceeding at a pace that nature can’t sustain. According to conservationists, many animal species are unable to adapt fast enough to survive the dramatic changes of their habitat and climate that result from human activity. Consider the sloths of Central and South America, which move on average only 40 yards per day and sleep for 15 to 20 hours per day. Such ingrained biological habits leave them with virtually no chance of adapting to the rapid pace of industrial deforestation. Cox & Kings created this extraordinary infographic that identifies the most popular endangered species in Latin America in hopes to bring more awareness to the dangers they face. Hunting, pollution, global warming, urbanization, and agriculture are among the many man-made factors responsible for the large-scale destruction of natural animal habitats. According to the World Wildlife Fund, habitat loss is the greatest threat to biodiversity on this planet today. The impact of habitat destruction can trigger a wave of destructive forces. For example, the howler monkey—found in the tropical regions of Central and South America—is threatened by its inability to find food as a result of deforestation. When its food supply is threatened, the howler monkey is less likely to reproduce, thus compounding the threat to the health of its population. Deforestation, in particular, is a devastating driver of habitat loss. Half of the world’s original forests are already gone, and they continue to be removed at a rate 10x faster than they can be regrown. The impacts of human behavior are not felt only by the creatures of the land. There are currently only 8,000 nesting Hawksbill sea turtles left in the wilderness, many of whom inhabit the waters surrounding Costa Rica and other Latin American territories. The hawksbill and other sea turtles are facing extinction due to man-made climate change and human interference with its nesting sites and food sources. In addition to contributing to and volunteering for the many worthy conservationist organizations, you can also do your part by learning more about the animals that are currently threatened, where and how they live, and how they contribute to their respective ecosystems. + Cox and King

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