Endangered Borneo pygmy elephants cruelly slaughtered for ivory

January 4, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Endangered Borneo pygmy elephants cruelly slaughtered for ivory

Elephant poaching has ravaged populations in Africa for years – and now poachers are starting to target endangered pygmy elephants in Sabah, Borneo. On New Year’s Eve wildlife officials found the bones of Sabre, a male pygmy elephant known for having tusks similar to a sabre-tooth tiger’s. Only days before, they’d found another mutilated male elephant. Both horrifying incidents occurred less than a mile away from each other. Sabre was probably murdered in late November. Conservationists fitted him with a satellite collar after finding him on a palm oil plantation in October. They released him back into the wild, as poaching wasn’t thought to be a grave danger to elephants in the area. Related: 8 Heartbreakingly Adorable Endangered Animals That We Need to Save The other unnamed male elephant was likely killed about a month after Sabre; his face had been hacked off so the poacher could grab his tusks. Danau Girang Field Centre director Benoit Goossens said a professional hunter may have cruelly slaughtered the elephants. Goossens told The Guardian, “My hope is that Sabah wakes up…we are losing our megafauna, the rhino is gone, the banteng [wild cow] is going, the elephant will be next. Those crimes should not go unpunished. Let’s not lose our jewels, the next generation will not forgive us.” According to the World Wildlife Fund, only around 1,500 pygmy elephants are alive in the world. These small elephants struggling for survival in Sabah face deforestation and habitat loss, mainly at the hands of the palm oil industry. Wildlife Conservation Society Vice President of Species Conservation Elizabeth Bennett told The Guardian that elephants will be safe from poaching only when ivory markets are closed. China has announced plans to ban the ivory trade by the end of the year – and for imperiled elephants, that date can’t come soon enough. Via The Guardian Images via shankar s. on Flickr and Bas Leenders on Flickr

View original post here:
Endangered Borneo pygmy elephants cruelly slaughtered for ivory

Endangered Borneo pygmy elephants cruelly slaughtered for ivory

January 4, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Endangered Borneo pygmy elephants cruelly slaughtered for ivory

Elephant poaching has ravaged populations in Africa for years – and now poachers are starting to target endangered pygmy elephants in Sabah, Borneo. On New Year’s Eve wildlife officials found the bones of Sabre, a male pygmy elephant known for having tusks similar to a sabre-tooth tiger’s. Only days before, they’d found another mutilated male elephant. Both horrifying incidents occurred less than a mile away from each other. Sabre was probably murdered in late November. Conservationists fitted him with a satellite collar after finding him on a palm oil plantation in October. They released him back into the wild, as poaching wasn’t thought to be a grave danger to elephants in the area. Related: 8 Heartbreakingly Adorable Endangered Animals That We Need to Save The other unnamed male elephant was likely killed about a month after Sabre; his face had been hacked off so the poacher could grab his tusks. Danau Girang Field Centre director Benoit Goossens said a professional hunter may have cruelly slaughtered the elephants. Goossens told The Guardian, “My hope is that Sabah wakes up…we are losing our megafauna, the rhino is gone, the banteng [wild cow] is going, the elephant will be next. Those crimes should not go unpunished. Let’s not lose our jewels, the next generation will not forgive us.” According to the World Wildlife Fund, only around 1,500 pygmy elephants are alive in the world. These small elephants struggling for survival in Sabah face deforestation and habitat loss, mainly at the hands of the palm oil industry. Wildlife Conservation Society Vice President of Species Conservation Elizabeth Bennett told The Guardian that elephants will be safe from poaching only when ivory markets are closed. China has announced plans to ban the ivory trade by the end of the year – and for imperiled elephants, that date can’t come soon enough. Via The Guardian Images via shankar s. on Flickr and Bas Leenders on Flickr

See the rest here:
Endangered Borneo pygmy elephants cruelly slaughtered for ivory

Chrysler unveils all-electric self-driving Portal car "designed by millennials for millennials"

January 4, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Chrysler unveils all-electric self-driving Portal car "designed by millennials for millennials"

While Tesla and Google are busy developing the technology to make cars drive themselves, other auto companies are dreaming up what those autonomous cars of the future might look like . Fiat Chrysler just gave us a first look at its all-electric, self-driving car of the future ahead of the vehicle’s official debut this week at CES in Las Vegas. Far from a sporty coupe, the Chrysler Portal is a family car primed to leave present day minivans in the dust. The self-driving Portal looks rather similar to the Chrysler Pacifica minivan, although it sports a slightly narrower wheel base. The Portal also does away with the driver and front seat passenger doors in lieu of a single sliding door on each side. It’s worth noting that Chrysler isn’t actually calling the Portal a minivan, despite its appearance. Rather, Chrysler says the Portal is “next generation family transportation designed by millennials for millennials” which serves as “an open and serene atmosphere that bridges work and home.” Related: Chrysler and Google team up to create a self-driving minivan Among its many enticing attributes is the promised range of the all-electric vehicle – a whopping 250 miles or more on a full battery charge. Chrysler promises a 350-kilowatt fast charger that can juice up the battery enough in 20 minutes to travel up to 150 miles. The Portal’s cockpit looks drastically different than any car currently on the road, of course. Stripped down and minimalist in design, the self-driving concept car still features the essentials for human driving: a gas pedal and brake as well as a steering ‘wheel’ that looks more fit for a sci-fi set than a family van. Via The Verge and Autoblog Images via Fiat Chrysler

See the rest here:
Chrysler unveils all-electric self-driving Portal car "designed by millennials for millennials"

Israel to test electric roads that wirelessly charge vehicles as they drive

January 4, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Israel to test electric roads that wirelessly charge vehicles as they drive

Forget the charging port—the roads of the near future could power your electric car while you drive, eliminating the need to ever stop to recharge or refuel again. Israeli startup Electroad is working to pave the way towards a greener world with technology that retrofits existing roads with buried coils to inductively charge electric vehicles. The team has already performed successful tests of the technology, and will be demoing the electric roads on a larger scale with a public bus route in Tel Aviv . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mkpcavw_vFI Founded with the goal of reducing global emissions, Electroad promises a more cost-effective, efficient, and cleaner way to travel. The startup uses technology that relies on electromagnetic induction —the basic principle behind wirelessly powering smartphones and rechargeable toothbrushes—to power electric cars with renewable energy while driving. Although other companies like Qualcomm and KAIST also work with wireless vehicle charging, Electroad’s CEO Oren Ezer says that while the concept is the same, the technology is different. “Our technology is flexible,” said Ezer. “Only copper and rubber is needed, and deployment is quick and easy. You can retrofit one kilometer of road in just half a day, from night to morning.” The installation process begins with an asphalt scraper that digs an 8-centimeter-deep trench. A second vehicle installs the wireless energy charging strips and fills the trench back up with asphalt. Smart inverters with real-time communication are installed on the sides of the road. A coil unit attached beneath the electric vehicle receives power transferred over a small 24-centimeter air gap. Radiation is minimized and locally shielded for driver and passenger safety. Related: KAIST Launches First Road-Charged OLEV Electric Buses in South Korea Electroad plans to focus on public transportation first before opening the platform up to private transit. The startup successfully tested their technology with an electric bus five months ago in Tel Aviv and opened 20 meters of retrofitted electric road outside their lab. Soon the company will test out the technology on a public electric bus with a set route in Tel Aviv. Since the bus will drive on electric roads, it won’t need to be recharged though it will have a small battery to allow the bus to drive up to five kilometers without an electric current. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQ-DzXirW08 “We remove the energy source,” said Ezer. “The electricity will come from renewable energy transferred to the road. This is a really sustainable solution. A battery for an electric bus can cost $300,000 and weigh 5 tons. If you remove the battery then the bus is much lighter and requires less energy. This technology is cost saving. If you compare it to diesel buses, it’s half the price. If you just start with public transportation it will save money and then you can open it up to taxis and trams. Payback is very fast.” Ezer has a dream to turn all of Israel’s transportation electric with inductive charging. Electroad received a research and innovation grant from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 and recently completed a program at Capital Nature , an accelerator that focuses on emerging renewable energy in Israel. The startup plans to test their technology on a public bus route in Tel Aviv next year. + Electroad + Vibe Israel Tour courtesy of Vibe Israel Images © Electroad , last image © Lucy Wang

Read more from the original source:
Israel to test electric roads that wirelessly charge vehicles as they drive

11 Zimbabwe elephants found dead from cyanide poisoning in Cecil’s park

October 9, 2015 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on 11 Zimbabwe elephants found dead from cyanide poisoning in Cecil’s park

Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe has been the scene of another unnecessary killing, as park officials have confirmed they found 11 elephants poisoned to death with cyanide. Just months after Cecil the Lion was killed by American dentist Dr. Walter James Palmer in the same park, park rangers found the deceased elephants next to a cyanide-laced salt lick, several with their tusks removed. Authorities have also said three additional elephants were found dead in Matusadona Park, also from cyanide poisoning. Read the rest of 11 Zimbabwe elephants found dead from cyanide poisoning in Cecil’s park

See original here:
11 Zimbabwe elephants found dead from cyanide poisoning in Cecil’s park

Net-zero INhouse boasts water-smart solutions essential for parched California

October 9, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Net-zero INhouse boasts water-smart solutions essential for parched California

Read the rest of Net-zero INhouse boasts water-smart solutions essential for parched California

View original here:
Net-zero INhouse boasts water-smart solutions essential for parched California

Dymitr Malcew’s Tree House modules provide privacy in open-plan offices

October 9, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Dymitr Malcew’s Tree House modules provide privacy in open-plan offices

Read the rest of Dymitr Malcew’s Tree House modules provide privacy in open-plan offices

Continued here:
Dymitr Malcew’s Tree House modules provide privacy in open-plan offices

New Jersey’s Anti-Poaching Bill Aims to Protect Elephants and Rhinos

June 22, 2014 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on New Jersey’s Anti-Poaching Bill Aims to Protect Elephants and Rhinos

When we think of the illegal ivory trade, most people envision the large smuggling busts that happen in Africa or Asia. It may surprise you to learn that the port of Newark in New Jersey is a hub for the illegal wildlife trade. The Garden State recently took a symbolic stand against this horrific practice by  passing a bill that eliminates the trade in  ivory  and rhinoceros horn. The politicians who sponsored the bill, along with those from top conservation organizations, applaud the move and are confident it will help to deter poaching around the world. READ MORE> Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Elephant Poaching , elephant tusks , new jersey ivory ban , new jersey rhino horn ban , Rhino horns , rhino poaching

More: 
New Jersey’s Anti-Poaching Bill Aims to Protect Elephants and Rhinos

Illegal Poaching Threatens to Wipe Out One Fifth of African Elephant Population

December 2, 2013 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Illegal Poaching Threatens to Wipe Out One Fifth of African Elephant Population

Elephants at watering hole photo via Shutterstock Africa is poised to lose 20 percent of its elephant population over the next decade if illegal poaching continues at its current rate, according to new figures released by the Elephant Summit in Botswana. In a report by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), researchers estimate that 22,000 elephants were illegally killed just last year–a blow that shrank the population to less than half a million. The worse elephant massacre took place in September 2013 when poachers killed over 300 elephants by poisoning a watering hole with cyanide. Read the rest of Illegal Poaching Threatens to Wipe Out One Fifth of African Elephant Population Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: african elephants , central africa , CITES , Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species , elephant extinction , Elephant Poaching , elephant population , elephant summit , illegal poaching , Ivory Trade , ivory tusk , John E. Scanlon        

More here: 
Illegal Poaching Threatens to Wipe Out One Fifth of African Elephant Population

Bad Behavior has blocked 1622 access attempts in the last 7 days.