Turn the Eiffel Tower Green?

December 30, 2011 by  
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A concept to turn the Eiffel Tower into a giant green wall has been proposed as a symbolic statement of “the reconciliation of nature and mankind.”The plan calls for 600,000 plants to be attached to the structure using hemp sacks filled with soil as the growth media. An irrigation system comprising 12 tons of tubing would be used to provide water for the plants. The installation would not be permanent, and would be removed after a few years. But, once in place, the installation would help remove an estimated 87.8 tons of CO2 from the atmosphere. “Should it not be the duty of engineers to imagine a new future where nature is brought back into the heart of the city,” said a statement from Ginger, the company behind the proposal. With an estimated cost of nearly 100 million dollars for the project, that’s more than a million dollars per ton of CO2. Hardly the most cost effective carbon sequestration, but certainly a visible one. image: CC-BY 3.0 by Taxiarchos228 via: Sustainablog

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Turn the Eiffel Tower Green?

Using Light to Make Solar Panels

December 30, 2011 by  
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A new optical furnace that uses intense light rather than a conventional furnace to heat the silicon to make solar cells saves about half the energy needed . The process uses a furnace with “highly reflective and heat-resistant ceramics to ensure that the light is absorbed only by a silicon wafer, not by the walls inside the furnace.” The process was developed by scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). In addition to providing improved efficiency in the production of the cells, the optical furnace also does a better job at removing some impurities, which makes for better output from the finished panels. Eventually, researchers on the project believe that this could provide a four percentage point increase in the efficiency of the solar cells produced with this method. image credit: NREL/Dennis Schroeder via: Treehugger

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Using Light to Make Solar Panels

Oil Is Too Important To Burn In Cars

January 22, 2010 by  
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Megatrends 2020 If there is one lesson to be learned from the designers, thinkers and curators presenting at Conversations in Design: A World Without Oil , it is the fact that we need the stuff for a lot of uses far more important than pushing boxes of steel around on roads. When one realizes that we are using a cubic mile of the stuff every year (that is the Eiffel Tower on the right for scale), it becomes pretty obvious that this isn’t going to continue forever, and we have to begin to think about what we are going to use it for….

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Oil Is Too Important To Burn In Cars

POKENs Ditch Paper Business Cards, Could Make Shaking Hands More Than a Friendly Gesture

January 22, 2010 by  
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Oh yes…It’s an Obama POKEN. Image via MarketWatch video We know the greenest option for a business card: scratch the info off a card already handed to you, replace it with your own, and recirculate it.

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POKENs Ditch Paper Business Cards, Could Make Shaking Hands More Than a Friendly Gesture

The Week in Pictures: Exxon Valdez Oil Still Trapped in Alaskan Beaches, Appalachian Coal Set For Big Decline, ‘Super Snake’ Python Hybrid on the Rise, and More (Slideshow)

January 22, 2010 by  
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From the news that a new ‘super snake’ python hybrid may be on the rise in Florida to new research revealing that about 20,000 gallons of Exxon Valdez oil still remains trapped in the gravel beaches of Alaska, a lot happened this week in green. According to Downstream Strategies’ latest report, Appalachian coal is set for big declines in the coming decades due to market and legislative forces, Bill Gates argues that “We need innovation, not insulation,” concluding that the world is distracted from what counts in terms of dealing with climate change “in a big way,” and NPR brings to light how rigorous seed licensing is stick…

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The Week in Pictures: Exxon Valdez Oil Still Trapped in Alaskan Beaches, Appalachian Coal Set For Big Decline, ‘Super Snake’ Python Hybrid on the Rise, and More (Slideshow)

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