Boston public schools phase in new map to decolonize curriculum

March 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

The global map on which all your geographical knowledge is based probably wasn’t as accurate as you thought. For nearly 500 years, classrooms have referred to the Mercator projection, which exaggerated the size of continents in the northern hemisphere. But now Boston public schools are switching over to the Gall-Peters projection, which attempts to correct the sizes of countries and could have a dramatic impact on students’ worldview. The Flemish cartographer Gerardus Mercator devised the Mercator projection all the way back in 1569. Now hundreds of years later, Boston schools are implementing a replacement, and director of the Boston public schools history department Natacha Scott says they believe they are the first public school district in America to make the switch. Related: New map reveals the world’s most toxic countries The Mercator projection has informed our collective worldview for centuries, but Mercator made it seem as if North America and Europe were larger than South America and Africa , for example. He also moved the equator, which places Germany near the map’s middle instead of much further north. Arno Peters, a German historian, released his projection in 1974 – as it corresponds with work by James Gall, a 19th century Scottish cartographer; today it’s called the Peters or Gall-Peters projection. Now in Boston classrooms, teachers have put the Gall-Peters projection up next to the Mercator projection. Colin Rose, Assistant Superintendent of Opportunity and Achievement Gaps for the Boston Public Schools, told The Guardian, “This is the start of a three-year effort to decolonize the curriculum in our public schools…It’s important that students trust the material they are given in school but also question it. The Mercator projection is a symbolic representation that put Europe at the center of the world. And when you continue to show images of the places where people’s heritage is rooted that is not accurate, that has an effect on students.” But some people say the Gall-Peters projection is also distorted – stemming mainly from the fact that it’s difficult to place a three dimensional sphere shape on a two dimensional piece of paper. Sizes are correct in the Gall-Peters projection, but shapes are wrong: near the poles countries are stretched horizontally and near the equator they’re stretched vertically, according to Business Insider, which pointed to four alternatives , including the Winkel tripel projection which National Geographic adopted in 1998. Via The Guardian and Business Insider Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

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Boston public schools phase in new map to decolonize curriculum

Neil deGrasse Tyson: Trump’s anti-science budget will make America stupid again

March 21, 2017 by  
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President Donald Trump ’s proposed budget eviscerates government funding for basic scientific research and development, taking a sledge hammer to education, health and environmental protection. In a series of Tweets posted on Sunday, astrophysicist and TV host Neil deGrasse Tyson indirectly took on Trump’s budget , writing that making America great won’t happen until we make America smart again by increasing government funding, not by ignoring the scientific consensus on man-made global warming and slashing financial support for important programs that improve the quality of life for American citizens and ensure a livable world. https://twitter.com/neiltyson/status/843510463392616448 https://twitter.com/neiltyson/status/843513652611231744 https://twitter.com/neiltyson/status/843516171748069376 https://twitter.com/neiltyson/status/843518683053940736 https://twitter.com/neiltyson/status/843521200278069248 https://twitter.com/neiltyson/status/843523716977905664 https://twitter.com/neiltyson/status/843525981570662400 https://twitter.com/neiltyson/status/843530014104592384 Trump’s budget boosts Defense, Homeland Security and Veterans Affairs while proposing deep cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency (31.4%), Health and Human Services (16.2%), the State Department (28.7%), Commerce (15.7%), Transportation (12.7%), Labor (20.7%), Education (13.5%), Interior (11.7%), Agriculture (20.7%) and Housing and Urban Development (13.2%). Related: Trump team claims funding climate change is “a waste of your money” The budget would also eliminate or zero out programs including Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), which funds clean energy research; Global Climate Change Initiative; Great Lakes Restoration Initiative; Chesapeake Bay funding; National Endowment for the Arts; National Endowment for the Humanities; NASA’s Office of Education; and TIGER transportation grants, a program included in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 that funds innovative transit projects. Tyson isn’t the only scientist taking action against Trump’s war on science. The March for Science  is scheduled for Earth Day, April 22nd in Washington, D.C. and cities across the country. The mission statement posted on the March for Science website calls for “robustly funded and publicly communicated science as a pillar of human freedom and prosperity. We unite as a diverse, nonpartisan group to call for science that upholds the common good and for political leaders and policy makers to enact evidence based policies in the public interest.” Via Huffington Post Image 1 , 2 via Wikimedia

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Neil deGrasse Tyson: Trump’s anti-science budget will make America stupid again

A week inside Al Gore’s climate reality

March 21, 2017 by  
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It could have been angry and defiant. It could have been despondent and fatalistic. Or worse, it could have been rosy and effervescent.

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A week inside Al Gore’s climate reality

ScottWhitbyStudio transforms a shipping container into a pop-up cinema

March 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

We’ve seen shipping containers repurposed into everything from homes to museums , but ScottWhitbyStudio’s recent cargotecture creation marks the first pop-up cinema that we’ve heard of. The London-based architecture and creative consultancy converted a single container into Caution Cinema, an immersive and funky movie theater as part of the ‘Beyond Zero’ health and safety campaign. The mobile cinema plays instructional videos to promote vital dockside safety information to port employees up and down the country. Working together with a major UK port operator, ScottWhitbyStudio was asked to create an engaging pop-up cinema that provided an immersive viewing experience that would block out the hectic and noisy port surroundings. In choosing the commonly found shipping container as the cinema structure, the designers introduced an element of surprise by dramatically transforming the windowless container interior into a “dark and mysterious realm, which challenged expectations.” Attendees to the Caution Cinema enter via a disorienting zigzagging path to the cinema, where all external light and sound are blocked out. Related: The epic Creative Co-Op Is a Multi-faceted Film Studio Made from Shipping Containers “Using this multi-sensory experience, visitors are forced to take extra care and to proceed with caution—as promoted by the safety campaign,” write the architects. “It is hoped that the memory of this multi-sensory experience and intervention will be embed[ded] in the user’s memory for a long time to come.” All internal surfaces, from the entrance path to the cinema and seating, are clad in over a thousand pyramidal acoustic foam pieces laid out in a checkered pattern of black, blue, and red. The resilient foam pyramids create a soundless chamber so that attendees can focus on the video presentation without external distraction. + ScottWhitbyStudio Images via ScottWhitbyStudio © Osman Marfo-Gyasi

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ScottWhitbyStudio transforms a shipping container into a pop-up cinema

How emerging leaders view sustainable business

March 17, 2017 by  
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Check out what our young GreenBiz 17 Emerging Leaders have to say about the world of corporate sustainability.

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How emerging leaders view sustainable business

An investor discusses driving change by doing well

March 17, 2017 by  
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Cary Krosinsky discusses the shift towards value-first impact investing.

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An investor discusses driving change by doing well

The no-brainer case for saving fuel economy standards

March 17, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

4 reasons why the Trump administration should reconsider dismantling our current automotive fuel standards.

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The no-brainer case for saving fuel economy standards

More ways colleges are sowing seeds for a sustainable future

February 22, 2017 by  
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In week two of a 10-week series, schools create sustainable housing and celebrate social impact with a weeklong festival.

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More ways colleges are sowing seeds for a sustainable future

From scholarship to climate action at PSU

February 4, 2017 by  
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Portland State University’s learning journey from a veteran education center to a national champion of sustainable scholarship.

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From scholarship to climate action at PSU

Empowering Afghan women to code, teach, learn and inspire

February 3, 2017 by  
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Fereshteh Forough, founder and president of Code to Inspire, aims to bring Afghan women into the tech industry — while empowering their economic and social advancement.

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Empowering Afghan women to code, teach, learn and inspire

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