Fill Your Windows With Year-Round Edible Produce

October 29, 2019 by  
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There are many reasons to grow your own food. Avoiding … The post Fill Your Windows With Year-Round Edible Produce appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Fill Your Windows With Year-Round Edible Produce

We Earthlings: The CO2 Impact of Shipping Apples

October 29, 2019 by  
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Everything we eat has been transported to us, adding CO2 … The post We Earthlings: The CO2 Impact of Shipping Apples appeared first on Earth911.com.

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We Earthlings: The CO2 Impact of Shipping Apples

100% biodegradable, edible packaging is so much better than plastic

November 29, 2017 by  
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The world is awash in pollution from plastic packaging – but fortunately, some people are working hard to develop viable eco-friendly alternatives. Indonesia -based Evoware makes food packaging out of an unexpected material: seaweed . Instead of clogging our oceans, the non-toxic seaweed-based packaging biodegrades – and it’s even edible. Evoware’s 100 percent biodegradable packaging lasts for two years on the shelf, and is printable and heat sealable. It’s also a natural plant fertilizer. You can eat the packaging, taking advantage of the high fiber, mineral, and vitamin content. It could serve as a hamburger wrapping, for example, and there’d be no need to remove the packaging before eating the burger. Or it could hold instant noodle seasoning, and when a consumer poured in warm water to make the noodles, the packaging would dissolve. Evoware on their website describes their product as “almost tasteless and odorless.” The seaweed packaging can also form sachets to hold non-food items such as soap or sanitary pads. Related: Egyptian scientists turn dried shrimp shells into eco-friendly plastic Environmental challenges motivate the company, as Indonesia is the second largest contributor of ocean plastic . But co-founder David Christian said in a video they also aim to help poor seaweed farmers in the country. Indonesia is the biggest seaweed-producing country, according to Christian – but many of the farmers, due to a long marketing chain, don’t make enough money or are in debt to loan sharks. Their children are malnourished and can’t attend school. And unfortunately, a lot of the seaweed is wasted right now, he added. Evoware aims to use it, and increase these farmers’ incomes by turning seaweed into zero waste packaging. The company said on their website, “Through Evoware’s products, people evolve to be closer to nature and live a more responsible and sustainable life.” You can find out more here . + Evoware Images via Evoware

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100% biodegradable, edible packaging is so much better than plastic

How scaly dinosaurs turned into feathery birds – new gene study offers clues

November 29, 2017 by  
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Dinosaurs no longer roam the planet – unless you count birds . Recent discoveries have revealed many dinosaurs once had feathers , and birds are actually dinosaurs that have evolved over time. But we don’t really know how feathers evolved. A recent study led by University of Southern California (USC) researchers involving alligator and chicken genes may offer new insight. Feathers and scales are comprised of keratin, and both are part of skin growth, so scientists have surmised they might have a shared evolutionary history. But the nature of that history is still a mystery. A dinosaur unearthed in 2014 in Siberia appeared to possess feather-like filaments, some growing out of scales – leading researchers to think feather-like structures might have evolved from modified scales. So the USC-led team took genes they think might be important in the development of feathers and had them expressed in chicken and alligator embryos while feathers and scales, respectively, developed. They also identified new genes that regulate the development genes and altered the amount of their activity, according to The Guardian . Related: New details of feathered dinosaur could elucidate the origins of flight The researchers produced new types of modified scales, revealing relatively simple changes to some genes can cause alligator early scale development to produce things like the ancestral feathers of non-avian dinosaurs. The Guardian said it’s not a large step from the feather-like structures to something similar to a true early feather. Add the idea that early proto-feathers that gave advantages to their owners would have developed more under natural selection , and it’s not a massive leap to suggest feathers could have formed rather easily. Modifying genes in chickens led to an array of feather forms, including ones seen in dinosaurs, narrowing the gap between feather and scale from a creature with feathers. We still have a long way to go in our understanding, but this recent work could offer some clues. More gene tweaks could potentially reveal the pathway from scale to feather. The journal Molecular Biology and Evolution published the research this month; scientists from institutions in Taiwan, China, and Louisiana contributed to the work. Via The Guardian Images via Depositphotos and PublicDomainPictures.net

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How scaly dinosaurs turned into feathery birds – new gene study offers clues

Triangle Tree’s Edible Spoons Are a Tasty Alternative to Plastic Utensils

April 25, 2013 by  
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In an effort to create an alternative to disposable plastic silverware, Triangle Tree  has produced Edible Spoons, a spoon that you can eat after finishing your meal. Made of corn, the spoons are biodegradable and can either be composted or consumed. The Edible Spoon is also designed to break apart after use to make snacking easier. Created with all organic ingredients, the spoon comes in three flavors (plain, spicy, or sweet), and can act as a novel snack or an eco-friendly alternative to petroleum products. + Triangle Tree Via Geekologie Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Biodegradable , corn , edible spoon , food , Organic , petroleum , plastic , triangle tree        

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Triangle Tree’s Edible Spoons Are a Tasty Alternative to Plastic Utensils

Radhaus is a Glowing Bike Shop & Storage Facility in Eastern Germany

April 25, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Radhaus is a Glowing Bike Shop & Storage Facility in Eastern Germany Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , bicycle shop , bicycle station erfurt , bicycle storage , bike shed , bike shop , Bike Storage , Daylighting , eco design , erfurt , germany , green architecture , Green Building , green design , indoor bike storage , Osterwold Schmidt , Osterwold+Schmidt , radhaus , Sustainable Building , sustainable design        

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Radhaus is a Glowing Bike Shop & Storage Facility in Eastern Germany

The Great Crate is an LED-Illuminated Living Sculpture of 25,000 Edible Plants in Sydney

October 29, 2012 by  
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Made of recycled crates and 25,000 edible plants, The Great Crate was fully recyclable installation that was erected at the Art & About Sydney event last month. Over the weeks that the cube was in place, the growing plants gave the project a life of its own. The cube was lit at night by solar powered LED fairy and flood lights. This week, the 25,000 plants making up a giant living green cube by Plus One in Sydney have been given away to residents, making the fully recyclable artwork live on following its time as an installation. Read the rest of The Great Crate is an LED-Illuminated Living Sculpture of 25,000 Edible Plants in Sydney Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Architecture , contemporary design green , green architecture , Installation , plants , sydney , sydney australia , sydney green architecture , temporary garden , vegetables

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The Great Crate is an LED-Illuminated Living Sculpture of 25,000 Edible Plants in Sydney

Alice Waters’ Edible Schoolyard Launches Hand-Designed Levi’s Tees Over Lunch

August 26, 2011 by  
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Imagine a world in which schoolchildren eat organic, locally sourced lunches rich with fruits and vegetables — some of them heirloom varietals, some of them grown on the school grounds. That is the world that Alice Waters, the celebrity chef at Berkeley’s Chez Panisse , is promoting through her Edible Schoolyard project. This week, as part of Chez Panisse’s 40th anniversary celebration, Waters threw a school lunch block party in downtown San Francisco, co-hosted by Levi’s — and Inhabitat was there to check it out. Read the rest of Alice Waters’ Edible Schoolyard Launches Hand-Designed Levi’s Tees Over Lunch Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: alice waters , david byrne , Edible Schoolyard , green design , Levis , San Francisco , sophia coppolla , t-shirts

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Alice Waters’ Edible Schoolyard Launches Hand-Designed Levi’s Tees Over Lunch

Kirei Coco Goes Tropical with Coconut Shell Tiles

January 25, 2010 by  
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Kirei board has been on Materials Monday before, but the Kirei company also serves up Kirei Coco tiles, made from discarded coconut shells. The coconuts are harvested for their edible portions, and the shells were usually burned or thrown into landfills.

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Kirei Coco Goes Tropical with Coconut Shell Tiles

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