This edible, plastic-free packaging is grown from kombucha starter

June 26, 2018 by  
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Polish design student Roza Janusz has created Scoby, an eco-friendly alternative to plastic packaging that is easily grown with the same methods used to make kombucha . Created from fermented bacteria and yeast, the organic membrane can be used to store a variety of lightweight foods like seeds, nuts, or even salads. The zero-waste food packaging is completely biodegradable and can also be eaten after use. Developed as part of her graduate project for industrial design at the School of Form in Poznan, Poland, Roza Janusz’s Scoby was created to help farmers grow their own zero-waste packaging. Using bacteria and yeast as a base for kombucha, Janusz then uses the liquid to grow the biodegradable membrane in a shallow container. After about two weeks of adding sugars and other agricultural waste to ferment the material, a membrane forms on the surface and can be harvested. “Scoby is grown by a future farmer not only for the production of packaging , but also because of the valuable by-product, which is, depending on the concentration, natural fertilizer or probiotic drink,” says Roza Janusz. “So maybe the packaging production will no longer litter the environment, and it will even enrich it.” Related: DIY: How to brew kombucha at home The lightweight and translucent material is easily malleable and can be shaped to fit a variety of foods to prevent spoilage. Thanks to the edible packaging’s low pH, Scoby has a long shelf life that can even be extended if it’s used to store acidic food products like nuts. The material can also absorb the flavors of the food it stores. Roza Janusz plans to explore Scoby’s commercial possibilities in the near future and recently submitted her design for the Golden Pin Concept Design Award 2018 . + Roza Janusz

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This edible, plastic-free packaging is grown from kombucha starter

Scoffee: Edible cups mean you can have your coffee and eat it

February 26, 2015 by  
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Disposable coffee cups are a massive source of waste, the US alone throws out over 25 billion styrofoam coffee cups every year , so an edible coffee cup sounds like it could quite a good idea. Enter the ‘ Scoffee ,’ a coffee cup made from cookies, white chocolate, a thin layer of sugar and “infused aromas” that is set to launch at KFC locations in the UK. It doesn’t sound like it’ll the healthiest thing in the world, but it does have a certain ring of “waste not, want not.” Read the rest of Scoffee: Edible cups mean you can have your coffee and eat it Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: coffee , edible coffee cup , edible packaging , fast food , food engineering , food waste , Kentucky Fried Chicken , kfc , robin collective , scoffee , seattles best , Waste

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Scoffee: Edible cups mean you can have your coffee and eat it

NASA sending probe to Europa in search of ancient sub-glacial life

February 26, 2015 by  
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With past life on Mars already likely , NASA is making plans to venture farther into the solar system by sending a probe to Europa to search for life. One of Jupiter’s many moons, about the size of Earth’s moon, Europa has been the subject of much interest by astronomers for years. The Hubble space telescope first captured images of water vapor there in 2012, causing some scientists to suspect a salty ocean that lies beneath its glacial crust might contain evidence of life. Read the rest of NASA sending probe to Europa in search of ancient sub-glacial life Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Ames Research Center , europa , europa clipper , hubble telescope , jupiter , Life , moon , nasa , probe , vapor plume

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NASA sending probe to Europa in search of ancient sub-glacial life

WikiPearls Deliver Your Favorite Foods in Bite Sized Edible Packaging

June 12, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of WikiPearls Deliver Your Favorite Foods in Bite Sized Edible Packaging Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , edible food packaging , edible packaging , edible water bottle , green design , landfill waste , sustainable design , sustainable food , whole foods , Whole Foods edible packaging , Wikicells , WikiPearls

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WikiPearls Deliver Your Favorite Foods in Bite Sized Edible Packaging

Denmark’s Gorgeous Faaborg Harbour Bath Encourages Visitors to Swim in the Sea

June 12, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Denmark’s Gorgeous Faaborg Harbour Bath Encourages Visitors to Swim in the Sea Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: branching pier Denmark , denmark architecture , Denmark waterfront , Faaborg Harbour Bath , Faaborg Harbour Bath Denmark , harbor architecture , JDSA architecture , marine architecture , pier design , Wooden piers

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Denmark’s Gorgeous Faaborg Harbour Bath Encourages Visitors to Swim in the Sea

Virgina Tech Researchers Create Food from Non-Edible Plant Materials

April 19, 2013 by  
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Few people turn to a tree branch or corn husk for a meal, and for good reason. The cellulose found in the cell walls of plants is enormously difficult for the human digestive system to break down. As one of the most abundant organic materials in the world, transforming the carbohydrate could serve a potential food source for a population estimated to reach 9 billion by 2050. Researchers from Virginia Tech have found a way to convert cellulose into amylose through a bioprocess called “simultaneous enzymatic biotransformation and microbial fermentation”. They published their findings this week in the Early Edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Read the rest of Virgina Tech Researchers Create Food from Non-Edible Plant Materials Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: amylose , carbohydrate , cascading enzymes , cellulose , chun you , corn stover , edible packaging , ETHANOL , food , hongge chen , Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , starch , virginia tech , Y.H. Percival Zhang        

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Virgina Tech Researchers Create Food from Non-Edible Plant Materials

Stunning Prefab Northcote Home Combines Minimalist and Passive Design in Australia

April 19, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Stunning Prefab Northcote Home Combines Minimalist and Passive Design in Australia Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: australia , Daylighting , eco design , glazing , green design , Melbourne , minimalist design , modscape , modular architecture , natural light , natural ventilation , Northcote Home , prefabricated design , rainwater collection , rainwater harvesting , solar gain , solar heated water , sustainable design        

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Stunning Prefab Northcote Home Combines Minimalist and Passive Design in Australia

Brazilian Fast-Food Chain Cuts Waste By Serving Up Burgers Wrapped In Edible Paper

December 17, 2012 by  
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A Brazilian fast-food chain has introduced a clever solution for customers tired of having to unwrap their hamburger before eating it: edible packaging . As part of a marketing campaign designed to position their burgers as literally irresistible and reduce paper waste headed for the landfill, a restaurant chain called “Bob’s” recently experimented with a burger wrapping made from edible paper.  According to PSFK , the campaign was so successful that not a single customer threw away the wrappings, which meant a lot less trash to haul out to the dumpster. I’m sure you’re wondering exactly what this so-called edible packaging is made from and what it tastes like. Unfortunately, those details are a little hard to find.  Comunicadores  reports that agency NBS created the packaging, and that the specially wrapped burgers were only available in Bob’s restaurants for a limited time. Most edible papers are made from sugar or rice, so its conceivable that those ingredients also come into play with the NBS packaging. As you’ll see in the video it’s possible to apply condiments and stuff the burger in your mouth wrappings and all, so it can’t taste that bad. Although the gastrointestinal wisdom of eating an unwrapped hamburger is questionable, there’s no denying that this type of packaging could be great for the environment. Remember when public pressure forced major fast food chains to abandon Styrofoam boxes for the paper wrap and paperboard boxes used today? While it’s better for the environment, paper packaging still come with a huge carbon footprint and creates mountains of unnecessary waste. Edible packaging is biodegradable and compostable, reducing the amount of litter that must be carted off to the landfill. via DesignTaxi

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Brazilian Fast-Food Chain Cuts Waste By Serving Up Burgers Wrapped In Edible Paper

Brazilian Fast-Food Chain Cuts Waste By Serving Up Burgers Wrapped In Edible Paper

December 17, 2012 by  
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Comments Off on Brazilian Fast-Food Chain Cuts Waste By Serving Up Burgers Wrapped In Edible Paper

A Brazilian fast-food chain has introduced a clever solution for customers tired of having to unwrap their hamburger before eating it: edible packaging . As part of a marketing campaign designed to position their burgers as literally irresistible and reduce paper waste headed for the landfill, a restaurant chain called “Bob’s” recently experimented with a burger wrapping made from edible paper.  According to PSFK , the campaign was so successful that not a single customer threw away the wrappings, which meant a lot less trash to haul out to the dumpster. I’m sure you’re wondering exactly what this so-called edible packaging is made from and what it tastes like. Unfortunately, those details are a little hard to find.  Comunicadores  reports that agency NBS created the packaging, and that the specially wrapped burgers were only available in Bob’s restaurants for a limited time. Most edible papers are made from sugar or rice, so its conceivable that those ingredients also come into play with the NBS packaging. As you’ll see in the video it’s possible to apply condiments and stuff the burger in your mouth wrappings and all, so it can’t taste that bad. Although the gastrointestinal wisdom of eating an unwrapped hamburger is questionable, there’s no denying that this type of packaging could be great for the environment. Remember when public pressure forced major fast food chains to abandon Styrofoam boxes for the paper wrap and paperboard boxes used today? While it’s better for the environment, paper packaging still come with a huge carbon footprint and creates mountains of unnecessary waste. Edible packaging is biodegradable and compostable, reducing the amount of litter that must be carted off to the landfill. via DesignTaxi

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Brazilian Fast-Food Chain Cuts Waste By Serving Up Burgers Wrapped In Edible Paper

Ford Hybrids C-Max and Fusion Fail to Meet Fuel Economy Standards

December 17, 2012 by  
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If you drive a Ford C-Max or a Ford Fusion Hybrid , you might want to double check the fuel economy of your car. Two of Ford’s hybrids, the C-Max and the Fusion, fell short of fuel economy targets when tested by Consumer Reports , said the Detroit automaker on Friday. But Ford isn’t shying away from this potentially embarrassing issue, saying that it wants to work with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to improve the way it determines fuel efficiency, claiming that the current testing methods leave too much to chance and produce erratic results. Read the rest of Ford Hybrids C-Max and Fusion Fail to Meet Fuel Economy Standards Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Consumer Reports blows whistle on Ford hybrids , environmental protection agency , EPA testing methods for fuel economy , Ford C-MAX , ford fusion , Ford hybrid vehicles , Ford hybrid vehicles fall short of EPA targets , miles per gallon , Raj Nair , vehicle fuel economy , vehicle fuel efficiency , vehicle fuel performance

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Ford Hybrids C-Max and Fusion Fail to Meet Fuel Economy Standards

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