The threatened Great Barrier Reef is estimated to be worth $42 billion

June 26, 2017 by  
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Our unsustainable habits are propelling climate change , and as a result, the Great Barrier Reef is under immense environmental stress.  Coral bleaching has reached record levels and no one knows if or when the coral will ever recover. This is concerning not just from an environmental perspective, but, as a new report by Deloitte Access Economics shows, that loss of the reef would represent an “economic catastrophe” as it is estimated to be worth $56 billion (AUS), or $42 billion (USD). As water temperatures rise, the coral expels algae living within, causing it to turn ghostly white (a phenomenon known as coral bleaching). Though consumers everywhere are changing their habits to reduce greenhouse emissions and prevent global warming from worsening, no one knows for sure how long it will take — or even if — the bleached portions will bounce back. To determine that the Great Barrier Reef’s economic worth, the report took into consideration a few factors. All in all, it was concluded that $29 Billion (AUS) is generated from the tourism industry — including the creation of 64,000 jobs, $24 billion (AUS) to indirect or non-use value (describing people who have heard of the reef but haven’t yet visited) and $3 billion (AUS) from recreational use, such as boating. Commissioned by the Great Barrier Reef Foundation, the report is the first in the world to calculate the economic value of the reef.   Survey answers from 1,500 Australian and international respondents from 10 countries were taken into account and ended up revealing the extent to which some people have come to depend on the Unesco World Heritage Site. Said U.S. politician and environmentalist Al Gore in the report , “This timely report is a much needed, holistic view of the incredible economic value and opportunities provided by the Great Barrier Reef. Any failure to protect this indispensable natural resource would have profound impacts not only to Australia but around the world.” Related: Rising ocean temperatures are cooking the Great Barrier Reef to death According to Great Barrier Reef Foundation director Steve Sargent, the report “sends a clear message that the Great Barrier Reef—as an ecosystem , as an economic driver, as a global treasure—is too big to fail.” He added that at $42 billion (USD), “the reef is valued at more than 12 Sydney Opera Houses.” Located off the coast of Queensland, Australia, the largest coral reef system in the world isn’t just affected by warming waters. As Gizmodo reports, farming runoff, urban development. cyclic outbreaks of crown-of-thorns starfish and boating accidents are also damaging the reef at an increasing rate. Experts are presently collaborating to find solutions which will preserve the Great Barrier Reef. Ideas so far include the construction of coral nurseries, increasing the efficiency of starfish culls and cutting greenhouse gas emissions to prevent a further increase in sea surface temperatures. + Deloitte Via Gizmodo Images via Pixabay  ( 1 , 2 )

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The threatened Great Barrier Reef is estimated to be worth $42 billion

Researchers record fish "singing" choruses at the break of dawn in Australia

September 23, 2016 by  
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Fish don’t just sing in cartoons or picture books – it turns out their choruses can also be heard in the coastal waters of Western Australia , especially at dawn or sunset. Curtin University researchers captured seven distinct melodies, and say the fish songs could help us better understand their ecosystems . Four researchers from Curtin University’s Centre for Marine Science and Technology wrote a research article published this month in the journal Bioacoustics . They recorded fish sounds near Port Hedland for 18 months. Sorting through sounds of ships and humpback whales, they managed to extract the fish choruses, which happened mostly between ” late spring and early autumn ,” the area’s wet season. Related: 400-year-old Arctic shark is the oldest living vertebrate animal in the world The songs swell as each fish repeats a noise over and over, and the sounds layered over one another create the chorus. The fish even sing at daybreak, at sunset, or at both times as birds might. The information on patterns and locations of these fish calls could give us deeper insight into their intricate ecosystems. Noises like these are important to fish as they feed, stake out their territory, or reproduce. Scientist Robert McCauley who is a co-author of the paper told New Scientist, “I’ve been listening to fish squawks, burble, and pops for nearly 30 years now, and they still amaze me with their variety. We are only just beginning to appreciate the complexity involved and still have only a crude idea of what is going on in the undersea acoustic environment.” You can listen to the fish choruses here . The sounds you’ll hear come from the Black Jewfish, which makes a “foghorn” sound; a Terapontid species making a sound like the “buzzer in the Operation board game” according to co-author Miles Parsons; and the “ba-ba-ba” sound of a batfish. Via New Scientist Images via gjhamley on Flickr and Wikimedia Commons

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Researchers record fish "singing" choruses at the break of dawn in Australia

Microplastics are killing fish faster than they can reproduce

June 8, 2016 by  
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There are 5 trillion pieces of plastic floating around in the Earth’s oceans, many of which are microplastics no larger than 5 mm large. These tiny particles are being gobbled up by fish and killing them faster than they can reproduce . A new study found that consuming the plastic pieces also slows fish down and interferes with their natural abilities to sense oncoming predators. The study , published in Science , observed perch larvae and their eating habits. When in the presence of microplastics, such as microbeads , the little guys actually preferred eating these harmful morsels over their usual meals of plankton. Ingesting the plastics slowed down development and interfered with the chemical signals the fish rely upon to sense when deadly predators are near. When pike were introduced into habitats where perch had been munching on microplastics, the perch were four times more likely to be eaten than those in a more natural environment. Related: Sea turtles face growing danger due to plastic trash in Australian waters Not only does ingesting plastic impede digestive systems with the fish, as well as with seabirds and other creatures, it seems there are longer-lasting effects on how the fish behave. All of these effects combined lead to increased mortality rates. In fact, all of the fish exposed to microplastics in the study were dead within 48 hours. Oona Lönnstedt, one of the study’s authors, told The Guardian , “If early life-history stages of other species are similarly affected by microplastics, and this translates to increased mortality rates, the effects on aquatic ecosystems could be profound.” Via  The Guardian Images via Flickr ( 1 , 2 )

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Microplastics are killing fish faster than they can reproduce

Is climate change causing Alaskan seabirds to starve to death?

January 13, 2016 by  
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The shores of Alaska’s Prince William Sound are littered with the carcasses of tens of thousands of seabirds  after a mass die-off that scientists say could be caused by climate change. Federal wildlife officials say the birds, all of a species known as the common murre, starved to death. That’s a clear indication that their food supply has been disrupted, but even the experts aren’t exactly sure why. Read the rest of Is climate change causing Alaskan seabirds to starve to death?

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Is climate change causing Alaskan seabirds to starve to death?

What looks like giant white crystals is actually a lake house in Western Massachusetts

January 13, 2016 by  
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Polar bears are getting dosed with Prozac to keep them calm in captivity

January 13, 2016 by  
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A visit to the zoo wouldn’t be complete without a stop by the polar bear enclosure. Seeing the majestic creatures padding about and docilely swimming up to kids as they peer through the glass may seem like a wonderful experience for a paying guest – yet these behaviors go against everything polar bears are programmed to do. Social isolation, boredom, and living in an enclosure that’s a fraction of what their normal habitat range would be in the Arctic causes bears and other captive animals to quite literally become mentally ill . So prescribing antidepressants and other medications to zoo animals has become a common practice. One that some zoos don’t want the public to know about. Read the rest of Polar bears are getting dosed with Prozac to keep them calm in captivity

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Eco-Resolutions to Help You Save Money and the Environment

January 7, 2016 by  
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A new year sparks adamant goals and promising intentions for the coming months. Not only does vowing to reduce your carbon footprint have a positive impact on the ecosystem, it often results in financial savings and can even enhance your overall…

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Eco-Resolutions to Help You Save Money and the Environment

UK’s first natural public pool will use plants, not chemicals, to stay clean

March 27, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of UK’s first natural public pool will use plants, not chemicals, to stay clean Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: ecosystem , Efa Pfannes , King’s cross redevelopment , Kings Cross , Marjetica Potr? , natural pond , natural pool , natural swimming pool , Of Soil and Water: King’s Cross Pond Club , ooze architects , small-scale pond , wetland plants

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UK’s first natural public pool will use plants, not chemicals, to stay clean

Lotus Belle Outback Tent provides a temporary luxury space with multiple purposes

March 27, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Lotus Belle Outback Tent provides a temporary luxury space with multiple purposes Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: beautiful portable shelters , green tents , green travel , large event tent , lotus belle , lotus belle outback tent , Lotus Belle tents , luxury tents , portable shelter , tents for events

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Lotus Belle Outback Tent provides a temporary luxury space with multiple purposes

INFOGRAPHIC: How Ecosystem Services Benefit Agricultural Productivity

May 20, 2014 by  
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There exists a fabulous symbiosis in nature between a healthy ecosystem and the diversity of life that flourishes in its vicinity. From microbes and mycelium to insects and birds, through to plants and even people, all benefit from an area that is rich in biodiversity and natural balance . Bioversity International has created an infographic that shows just how important it is to maintain and encourage this kind of balance, as well as tips on ways to ensure it exists in your own region, be that through crop rotation or planting native flower species to encourage pollinators  to visit. Check it out after the break! Read the rest of INFOGRAPHIC: How Ecosystem Services Benefit Agricultural Productivity Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: agriculture , air , Biodiversity , ecosystem , ecosystems , microbes , pollination , pollinators , water issues

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