Zaha Hadid Architects designs ecological residential complex for Mexicos Riviera Maya

May 19, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Zaha Hadid Architects designs ecological residential complex for Mexicos Riviera Maya

Mexico’s stunning Riviera Maya looks nothing short of paradise, but its beauty has also proven a burden on ecological preservation. With the Yucatan Peninsula’s booming tourism and environmental degradation in mind, Zaha Hadid Architects designed Alai, a residential complex in the Riviera Maya that embraces luxury but still maintains low environmental impact. Inspired by local Mayan culture and architecture, the nature-filled development will also contribute to restoration of native flora and fauna. Located on a site prepped by a previous owner for an unbuilt project, Alai will minimize its environmental impact by limiting the combined footprint of all its residential buildings to less than 7 percent of the site’s total area. The architects also plan to repair the previous owner’s damage to the site. Zaha Hadid Architects will collaborate with landscape architecture firm Gross Max and use replanting to repair the landscape, reverting the remainder of the site into a natural state that includes a woodland nature reserve and coastal wetland. To this end, the architects designed an onsite botanical nursery that serves as an attraction and tool for site restoration. Related: Sleep in sustainable luxury inside this eco-friendly jungle treehouse Alai’s luxury apartments as well as sport, leisure, and wellness amenities will be set on an elevated platform just above the canopy so as to not disturb local wildlife crossings. The apartments offer four different floor typologies, all of which enjoy ample amounts of natural light, natural ventilation , private balconies, and unobstructed views to the Caribbean Sea or Nichupté Lagoon. The sinuous and textured facade draws inspiration from local Mayan masonry and the rich natural environment. + Zaha Hadid Architects Via WAN Images by firms credited in titles

Read the rest here:
Zaha Hadid Architects designs ecological residential complex for Mexicos Riviera Maya

San Francisco’s first community-built living wall is a drought-resistant masterpiece

May 27, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on San Francisco’s first community-built living wall is a drought-resistant masterpiece

We’re talking about an enormous wall of plants in California, where a severe drought has robbed residents of much-needed water for several years. With that in mind, Heineman, SF Landscapes , Goldberg and her team at Planted Design created the 1,200-square-foot living mural from 3,200 drought-tolerant plants. The mural also includes an ingenious irrigation system, design by SF Landscapes , that collects and recycles rainwater using copper gutters and a 1,350-gallon recirculating rainwater collection tank. 200 feet of drip irrigation built into the living wall help keep the plants watered and happy in the midst of a California water shortage. Related: “World’s most environmental” restaurant opens in San Francisco In addition to being a sustainable masterpiece of ecological engineering, the greenery decorating the SafeHouse is also quite a sight to behold. The mural was carefully planned on a grid, much like a cross-stitch pattern, with undulating channels of varied colors leading from the sidewalk to the sky. The lush living wall has also created much-needed habitat for wildlife where none existed before, inviting birds, bees, and other critters to take up residency in the greenery, and a rooftop garden extends the greenery upward. The project interacts with the sense of smell, also. Yerba Buena, a native mint plant with little white flowers, was strategically placed over the doorway. The plant emits the aroma of mint, giving a little uplifting aromatherapy to those who enter the building. “As humans, most of us now spend 90 percent of our life surrounded by walls or commuting in a maze of concrete and metal, yet we all have an intrinsic need to connect with nature ,” said Goldberg. “When we’re around plants we literally breathe easier. Planted Design’s clients also see the value of plants, whether it’s greening an indoor workspace or giving life to a community wall, like the one we just built.” + Planted Design + The SafeHouse + SF Landscapes Images via Planted Design *There were originally several errors in this post, including the local of the building, which we have since updated and corrected. The building is located on 14th Street near the corner of Folsom Street. There are native plants included in the living wall, but also many non-native plants; including Yerba Buena, fescue, pine (!!!), oxalis , tansy, geraniums, and others. The design was a collaboration of several architects and landscape designers, including Zach Heineman, Amanda Goldberg, Brandon Pruett, and Brett Stephens of SF Landscapes .

Read more from the original source:
San Francisco’s first community-built living wall is a drought-resistant masterpiece

Futuristic Villa Kogelhof Wins Prestigious ARC13 Architecture Award

December 2, 2013 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Futuristic Villa Kogelhof Wins Prestigious ARC13 Architecture Award

Dutch firm Paul de Ruiter Architects has triumphed over 110 entries to win the highly-esteemed ARC13 architecture prize with their ecologically-minded Villa Kogelhof. The prestigious award is given to those few projects “wherein the usage and the technology are aligned in an innovative manner, aiming to strengthen sustainability as an integral part of architecture.” Located in Kamperland, Zeeland, Villa Kogelhof is a privately owned, energy efficient home set on 25 hectares of protected land. Read the rest of Futuristic Villa Kogelhof Wins Prestigious ARC13 Architecture Award Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “energy efficiency” , Arc13 awards , carbon neutral housing , dutch design , Ecological Design , ecological protection , green building in the Netherlands , nature-responsive design , sustainable design , Sustainable Materials , VILLA KOGELHOF        

See the original post here:
Futuristic Villa Kogelhof Wins Prestigious ARC13 Architecture Award

Terunobu Fujimori’s Otherworldly Tree Houses Defy the Laws of Gravity

September 4, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Terunobu Fujimori’s Otherworldly Tree Houses Defy the Laws of Gravity

Read the rest of Terunobu Fujimori’s Otherworldly Tree Houses Defy the Laws of Gravity Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “natural materials” , charred cedar wood , Ecological Design , green roof , house on stilts , japan architecture , mud houses , Sustainable Building , tea houses , Terunobu Fujimori

Read the original here:
Terunobu Fujimori’s Otherworldly Tree Houses Defy the Laws of Gravity

More Than 30 Million People in China Live in Eco-Friendly Caves

March 23, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on More Than 30 Million People in China Live in Eco-Friendly Caves

In China, calling someone a caveman shouldn’t be taken as an insult – in fact, Mao Zedong lived in a cave before becoming the country’s leader. Today, many Chinese people still live in caves . And we aren’t talking about just one or two people; according to the LA Times , at least 30 million people — and possibly closer to 40 million — Chinese currently live in caves, which are energy efficient and have a low environmental impact. Read the rest of More Than 30 Million People in China Live in Eco-Friendly Caves Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , cave dwellings , cave homes , Caves , china , Chinese caves , eco design , eco dwelling , eco house , Ecological Design , energy efficient design , green architecture , green design , Shaanxi caves , Shanxi caves

The rest is here:
More Than 30 Million People in China Live in Eco-Friendly Caves

Bad Behavior has blocked 884 access attempts in the last 7 days.