Minimalist cabin in the Netherlands allows glampers to relax in style

November 16, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

From fancy safari tents to futuristic pods , there are various levels of glamping these days. But for those looking to get back to basics without sacrificing style, the De Grote Beer cabin located on a remote island in the Netherlands is right up your alley. Designed by Depot Rotterdam , the minimalist cabin is clad in black-washed wood with large glazed facades that allow guests to immerse themselves in the stunning nature that surrounds the site. Located on the breathtaking Terschelling Island, the two-bedroom, one-bath cabin  is a serene retreat that lets people disconnect while reconnecting with nature. The interior has a fully-functioning kitchen space and a welcoming dining and living area that opens up to an outdoor deck via large sliding glass doors. The interior design features a modern, minimalist color and materials palette, and the entire cabin runs on green electricity. Related: Gorgeous “glamping” eco-cabins help you reconnect with nature in luxury The two bedrooms are designed with simple wood walls, white ceilings and large windows that not only provide natural light but also stunning views. There is a master bedroom with a double bed and a second bedroom with bunk beds. The second bedroom also has a fabulous dome that allows guests to enjoy a bit of stargazing as they drift off to sleep. From the living space, guests can easily walk out onto the large, open-air deck. Wrapping around the front of the cabin with an exterior wood-burning fireplace, this deck is the heart of the retreat . A large sitting area with a table can be used for dining, playing games, reading or simply taking in the fresh air. The De Grote Beer cabin, which can be rented through Boutique Homes , starts at €87 per night. + De Grote Beer + Depot Rotterdam Via Dwell Photography by  Claudia Otten Photography via De Grote Beer

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Minimalist cabin in the Netherlands allows glampers to relax in style

A dull, 26-year-old Airstream becomes a bright, cozy home on wheels

November 16, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

While they were dating, travel-loving couple Nate and Taylor Lavender bonded over their shared dream of tiny home living. Years after they met, the ambitious duo decided to bring that dream to fruition by converting a 1992 Airstream into a bohemian, light-filled home on wheels, renamed Augustine the Airstream . Today, the couple, along with their incredibly cute dog Summit, are enjoying the freedom of life on the road. The couple did most of the renovation work themselves , starting with the exterior. Airstreams are known for their shiny aluminum cladding, but Augustine’s nearly-30-year-old exterior had a dull, weathered appearance. To restore its luster, the Lavenders used two rounds of paint stripper before buffing and polishing it back to its shiny gleam. Related: A 1972 Airstream becomes a bright, 198-square-foot home for a family of four Renovating the Airstream ‘s interior, which was pretty shabby, was also quite an arduous task. Stripping the interior to the bone, the couple began to create a new layout that would work best for their lifestyle. They both work from home, so it was essential to create a work space and plenty of storage to keep the interior clutter-free. The couple decided to keep the interior’s color palette neutral with just hints of color. They painted the walls white and installed lightweight, peel-and-stick vinyl plank flooring. To make the most of the compact space, Nate custom-built most of the furniture, including the booth table in the kitchen, the side table next to the sofa, a shelving unit and the bed frame. The best part of the tiny home is the kitchen, which was completely redone to create a simple and clean aesthetic. From there, Nate and Taylor added fun texture with a pressed tin backsplash and hanging plants. The couple also installed a working/dining cubical that faces the kitchen. A beautiful tabletop made out of reclaimed wood pulls double duty as a dining table and work space. A comfortable loveseat was placed in the living room, book-ended by a side table and shelving unit. The dark wood on the tables, along with colorful pillows and a pendant light, give the space a welcoming, bohemian feel. A free-standing fireplace creates a warm and cozy atmosphere during frigid winters. + Augustine the Airstream Via Dwell Images via Nate and Taylor Lavender

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A dull, 26-year-old Airstream becomes a bright, cozy home on wheels

Is your business wasting money on waste?

November 16, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Excess product poses a material risk to your company and to the planet. Here’s how to recover those losses.

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Is your business wasting money on waste?

In the business of wasting nothing

November 16, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Matthew Hollis, founder and CEO of waste management software firm Elytus, talks about the cultural side of trash.

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In the business of wasting nothing

Save money and energy this winter with these 7 sustainable home heating systems

November 14, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

When winter comes, utility expenses can destroy your budget, and most traditional heating methods are also bad for the environment. Fortunately, there are plenty of sustainable types of home heating systems that can also save you money in the long run. From solar power to hydronic systems, here are seven different types of sustainable heating available for your home. Geothermal Systems Geothermal heating is both eco-friendly and efficient. These systems work by using temperatures deep underground to heat your home. Temperatures are much warmer in the earth than outside, which means less energy is used to heat the air. Not only does this result in an efficient heating system, but it also lowers the monthly utility bill. The one downside to geothermal heating , however, is upfront cost. This type of heating is expensive to install, but it does pay for itself the long run. On average, it takes around eight years to pay it off. In addition to helping lower energy costs, geothermal systems also increase the value of your home, which is another consideration when calculating the investment. Solar Power Solar power is easily one of the best ways to power a home. Although the initial investment can be significant, you are basically getting free energy for the rest of the home’s life. The same is true with solar heating, which generally comes in two formats: hydronic collectors and air systems. Hydronic collectors heat liquid to warm up the house, while air systems work more like traditional HVAC systems. If you have forced air already installed, then a solar air heater is the best option. The opposite is true if your house features a radiant heater. Choosing a solar heating system that fits into your home’s current HVAC system can save you a lot of money in upfront costs. Pellet Heating Pellet stoves are set up similarly to their wood counterparts, only they burn pellets instead of wood. The pellets are created from a mixture of waste products and switch grass, both of which are friendly to the environment . These pellets are also affordable to purchase, especially when compared to wood. A typical budget for pellets is around $600 a year. You also do not have to worry about stacking, chopping or storing wood, as the pellets can be placed in a basement or garage with no issues. Apart from saving money on the fuel source, pellet stoves are easy to install and budget-friendly. The average cost to install a pellet stove system is around $2,500, depending on the size of the home and how the HVAC system is laid out. For houses that are larger than 1,500 square feet, two pellet stoves will likely be necessary for adequate heating. This might appear like a significant investment, but the money you save on pellets will pay for the additional units over time. Related: 10 money-saving tips for a green home Wood Burners Wood burners are one of the most popular methods of sustainable heating. While wood burners have received a bad reputation over the years, new models are more efficient and more eco-friendly than their predecessors. Even better, new wood burners are powerful enough to heat entire homes. You can even find some wood burners that can handle sawdust pellets, which are not too different from what pellet stoves burn. The one downside to wood burners is that you have to install an extensive system to properly ventilate the burner. This includes installing pipes and a chimney that vents to the outside. When the cold months come, of course, you also have to determine how you are going to chop and store your wood. It is usually recommended to keep the wood away from the house as pests are attracted to wood piles, which means you will have to go outside whenever you need more fuel. Masonry Heating Masonry heaters exist somewhere between wood burners and pellet stoves. These heaters work by trapping heat in a chamber of bricks and then distributing warm air over the next 24 hours. Masonry heaters burn wood but generate less pollution than traditional wood burners, because they do not burn as fast. This also makes them more efficient, as they are better at trapping heat, and you do not have to purchase as much wood each year. Like wood burners, masonry heating systems require a bit of an investment to get up and running. A typical setup can be as low as $2,000 or as high as $5,000, depending on the size of the home and the layout. Hydronic Heat Systems Hydronic heating works by running hot water in pipes under the floor, through base boards or via radiators that are distributed throughout the home. These systems usually feature a boiler that heats up the water — using geothermal or solar power — and a pump that sends the hot water throughout the house. At some point, the water runs through a heat exchanger, which transfers the energy into a usable form. With hydronic heating systems, there are three ways in which the heat is converted: radiation, conduction and convection. Each system has its pros and cons, and picking the right one depends on your home’s layout. Wind Power Wind power has been around for a long time, but many people do not know that you can also use wind to create heat — and you do not need a massive windmill to get the job done. These systems work in conjunction with a water heater, with the wind providing energy to run the heater. The catch with wind power is that you need to live in an area that gets a good amount of air flow to turn the turbine. You also have to set up your house like a hydronic system to pump the hot water through, which might add extra costs if your home features a traditional forced-air system. No matter how you choose to sustainably heat your home, be sure to consult with professionals when making your decision. This winter, you’ll be able to get warm and cozy knowing you are doing your part for the environment. Via Do It Yourself and Freshome Images via Mark Johnson , Vela Creations and Shutterstock

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Save money and energy this winter with these 7 sustainable home heating systems

Zaha Hadid unveils futuristic designs for New Moscow

November 12, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Zaha Hadid Architects and Russian firm TPO Pride Architects have been selected as one of the consortiums to design the new Rublyovo-Arkhangelskoye neighborhood, a new development on the western boundary of Moscow , Russia that’s been dubbed “New Moscow.” As expected of Zaha Hadid Architects, the renderings of the winning design depict curvaceous, futuristic architecture. The two other consortiums selected to develop the project include Japanese firm Nikken Sekki with local practice UNK Project as well as Italian architects Archea Associati alongside Russian partner ABD Architects. Spanning a site area of 460 hectares, Rublyovo-Arkhangelskoye will serve as a new residential, employment, civic and cultural hub that will be connected to Moscow’s metro system with a 19-kilometer metro line scheduled to break ground in 2020. The neighborhood is expected to not only integrate smart technology  but to also serve as a beacon for sustainable development, with a total of 4 million square meters of new buildings developed. A third of that land will be dedicated to green space as well as a 30-hectare lake at the center. New houses will accommodate 66,500 residents who will enjoy access to everything from new schools and medical clinics to a wide variety of civic, cultural and retail options. A total of 800,000 square meters of office space will be added with a focus on accommodating the financial, consulting, legal and auditing sectors. An expansion project of this size has been deemed necessary to relieve Moscow’s increasing congestion due to a skyrocketing population that has seen a growth of over 3 million people (over 30 percent) to 12.4 million in the past 20 years. Related: Zaha Hadid Architects weaves energy-saving tech into an otherworldly UAE landscape “Rublyovo-Arkhangelskoye will be a global benchmark for smart, sustainable cities,” Zaha Hadid Architects said in its press release. “Supported by the EDF Group’s platform for 3D simulations of energy and urban scenarios, the project will optimize the consumption and production of sustainable, local energy sources while integrating electric mobility, new technologies, services and infrastructure to increase connectivity and efficiencies. Its design also enables residents and visitors to unwind with their families, friends and the natural world that permeates through the heart of the city, creating an urban environment of ecological technology that seamlessly integrates natural and human-made systems.” + Zaha Hadid Architects Renders by VA and Flying Architecture via Zaha Hadid Architects

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Zaha Hadid unveils futuristic designs for New Moscow

Introducing … Circularity 19

November 12, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

The launch of GreenBiz Group’s newest event brand, a three-day event focusing on the systemic shifts to a circular economy.

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Introducing … Circularity 19

Is your sustainability team thinking enough about human rights?

November 12, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

By overlooking socioeconomic factors, we limit the potential for transformation.

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Is your sustainability team thinking enough about human rights?

Paving the way to zero-carbon cities through building codes

November 12, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Urban areas are growing rapidly — but green policies can build them to last.

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Paving the way to zero-carbon cities through building codes

Strategically slanted walls squeeze extra space out of a small guesthouse

November 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Strict building restrictions often dictate the design of home additions, but in certain cases, savvy architects know just how to work around them. Case in point is architect Nicole Blair, head of Austin-based Studio 512 , who has just unveiled The Hive guesthouse, a tiny home that expands as it rises upward, evoking the shape of a beehive. Built as a guest house for a residence in Austin, The Hive’s unusual shape is a solution to local building codes that required that the footprint of structure be confined to a maximum of 320 square feet. Not one to be limited by such regulations, architect Nicole Blair found a smart way to abide by the rules while still creating a gorgeous extension. Inspired by the shape of a beehive, Blair simply added a second story using walls that slant upward and outward from the base. This way, the walls expand as they rise, providing extra space to the second floor. Related: This swanky desert guesthouse was fashioned out of a former horse barn Clad in large cedar shake siding  repurposed from old roofing material, the charming tiny home with a very unusual shape is certainly eye-catching. The dramatically slanted walls and large windows framed in white add a touch of fairytale whimsy to the dynamic design. From the tilted kitchen walls to the spacious, angular bathroom to the sloping bedroom, the structure’s geometric character — and quirky personality — is evident. The small, covered entrance features an outdoor shower installed adjacent to the front door. Inside, the living space and kitchen are found on the first floor, where an open layout seamlessly connects the two spaces. In the kitchen, the angled walls also provide more counter space. Between the kitchen and living room, a wall of multiple glass panels bring in  natural light . A set of dark wooden stairs leads up to the second level, which houses the bedroom, bathroom and a small work space. Throughout the tiny home, bright white walls and ample natural light lend to the vibrant, modern aesthetic. The neutral color palette is contrasted nicely with a smart collection of modern furnishings and a mix of unique features such exposed copper pipes, blackened wood flooring and kitchen cabinetry made from  reclaimed longleaf pine . + Studio 512 Via Dezeen Photography by Casey Dunn and Whit Preston via Studio 512

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Strategically slanted walls squeeze extra space out of a small guesthouse

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