With California Design Den bedding your conscience can rest easy

January 27, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

In our ever-consuming world, sometimes we fail to pause and evaluate the impact of everyday necessities like linens. But textiles are a massive contributor to landfill  waste  and water pollution, so it’s important to consider the bedding you buy.  Proudly Californian brand California Design Den produces a line of bedding that will allow you (and your conscience) to sleep well at night. The lineup of sheets, duvets, towels, mattress covers, blankets and more is developed with sustainability in mind. Related: Modern Dane offers sustainable bedding for peace of mind while you sleep Sheet sets and individual flat or fitted sheets are made from non-toxic and chemical-free  natural materials  such as cotton and bamboo. To ensure a healthy and safe product, materials are independently tested to verify Standard 100 Oeko-Tex certification. This certification means they are free of over 300 commonly-found chemicals. The organic cotton is also GOTS certified. Since the bedding uses all-natural materials, they are even biodegradable at the end of their usable life. However, the goal is to keep them out of landfills as long as possible with a durable, quality design. Each product is crafted in a green-certified facility in India by experienced artisans.  The bedding is designed at the headquarters in California, a state widely known for its dedication to the  environment . The items are then produced in India and packaged in zero-plastic, paper-based boxes for shipment. The plant-based product and packaging materials mean California Design Den bedding doesn’t contribute to water pollution. “At California Design Den, ensuring our brand is sustainable and eco-friendly is our main priority,” said Deepak Mehrotra, Founder of California Design Den. “From production to packaging, we always want to ensure that what we’re putting out into the world is doing more good than harm. This is why we use natural fibers to produce our bedding, rather than microfiber which is known to cause  pollution . Our non-toxic and chemical-free biodegradable bedding is sourced from the highest-quality, earth-grown materials and crafted by skilled artisans in our certified green facility. Our packaging is also biodegradable and contains zero plastics to help prevent polluted waterways and oceans.” + California Design Den Images via California Design Den

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With California Design Den bedding your conscience can rest easy

Burned stadium in Oregon receives an upcycling makeover

January 27, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

The new Civic Park in Eugene, Oregon was designed for the Eugene Civic Alliance by Skylab, along with local partner architect Robertson Sherwood Architects, to revitalize a neighborhood. A fire destroyed the iconic Eugene Civic Stadium, the site of the new park. The new project is designed to revitalize the neighborhood and create new opportunities for recreation, physical education and community connection. It’ll also use reclaimed materials from the original stadium to upcycle into the new stadium . The Eugene Civic Park is a complex comprised of a new 40,000 square foot field house, a new stadium, sports field and facilities for non-profit after-school activities through KidSports, a nonprofit afterschool organization. Related: ZHA gets the green light for world’s first all-timber soccer stadium in England The stadium is located next to Amazon Creek, which gave the project immediate environmental concerns. The new project addresses the site considerations by working to restore the site’s original watershed ecology. It also works with the existing topography to direct stormwater to a planted green space. North-facing angled clerestories provide ample sunlight for the six multipurpose athletic courts used for basketball, volleyball and other sports. The field house was built using an affordable , pre-engineered Butler steel building system for cost-efficient structural strength. The modular design afforded by this building material allowed the design team free reign designing interior spaces for coaches and public meetings. “The design of the field house is inspired by the patterns inherent in human movement. Subtle gestures, including syncopated window patterns, angled walls, sloping berms and shifts in the rib spacing of the metal siding, integrate movement into the building itself,” according to Skylab. Despite the unfortunate fire that destroyed the original stadium on this site, materials were able to be reclaimed from the damaged building and used for the new building project. This includes the indoor wood benches and reception desks. A second phase of the park still to be built will feature a 2,500-seat stadium. An office suite, skybox, press box, locker rooms, storage and officials’ rooms will go with the stadium. + Skylab Architecture Photography by Stephen A. Miller

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Burned stadium in Oregon receives an upcycling makeover

Oatly wants farmers to plant more oats. Here’s how it’s helping

January 27, 2022 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Oatly is working with farmers and millers to bring oats into their crop rotations for food, economic and environmental benefits

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Oatly wants farmers to plant more oats. Here’s how it’s helping

3-in-1 flashlight, lighter and pry bar is rechargeable

January 26, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Want a multi-functional tool that is also eco-friendly? The Hunt 4.0 by London-based SEPTEM Studio is a rechargeable flashlight you can plug into your laptop. It’s also a lighter and a multi-purpose opener tool that fits on your keychain. Hunt 4.0 is the seventh Kickstarter from its creators. It is set to start production after orders received up until the Kickstarter’s deadline in early January 2022. Related: “Cheesy” solar charger kit empowers students in East Africa Hunt 4.0 works in two lighting modes and has a high-powered cree emitter in a titanium body. The flashlight portion of the tool is powered by a lithium-ion battery that will last one and a half hours at maximum brightness, or up to seven hours if you turn it down to the lower 20 lumens mode. That’s enough to take for camping or outdoors where you need extra light. The Hunt 4.0 tool also fills a tiny compartment with lighter fluid and acts as a real lighter. The end of the tool is a flat-head screwdriver or bottle opener that can be used for any task. It’s water resistant and hardy enough to withstand the jangling of your keychain no matter where you keep it. All of these functions are packed into something that fits on your keychain. Hunt 4.0 is just 2.8 inches long and .55 inches across, or about the size of your pinky finger. We love the compact size and durability of a tiny flashlight multi-tool that doesn’t need constant battery changes. Of course you do need a power source with mini USB to recharge. To recharge the Hunt 4.0, you just unscrew the top of the flashlight tool and plug into the USB in the neck of the device. If you have a vehicle with USB that can charge this, you’ll never run out of light while on the road. + SEPTEM Studio Hunt 4.0 Images via SEPTEM Studio

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3-in-1 flashlight, lighter and pry bar is rechargeable

How using 3D-printed foam can cut down concrete waste

January 25, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

The construction industry is highly unsustainable. In fact, 7% of global CO2 emissions result from cement production alone. In an effort to cut down construction-related carbon emissions, researchers in the Digital Building Technologies (DBT) department at ETH Zürich have created FoamWork. The project examines how foam 3D printing (F3DP) can be used in conjunction with concrete casting. The outcome is a less labor-intensive system that enhances material efficiency and lowers carbon emissions. Currently, cast-concrete structural elements use excessive material. Occasionally, engineers use hollow plastic forms to reduce concrete in standard slabs. For more complex systems, casting molds are made from timber or CNC-carved dense plastic foam. These labor-intensive systems overuse concrete or produce excessive waste from off-cuts. Conversely, using F3DP shapes within cast concrete formwork can save up to 70% of concrete, are significantly lighter and well-insulated. Related: New eco-friendly, decomposing construction foam unveiled A slab prototype by the DBT team shows how versatile it is to combine concrete structures and 3D-printed foam . The slab uses ribs derived from isostatic lines, which indicate the directions of compression and tension. Based on the principal stress pattern, the geometry of this slab has 24 cavities for foam inserts of 12 different shapes. For the foam production, ETH Zürich has collaborated with FenX AG, a company that uses mineral waste to produce high-performance building insulation. A robotic arm fabricates the foam components using recycled fly ash, the waste from coal-fired power stations. The foam components are arranged in timber formwork before poured in ultra-high-performance fiber-reinforced concrete (UHPFRC) to cast the structural element. Once the concrete cures, the foam pieces can either be left in for their insulative properties, or the raw material can be recycled and reprinted for other FoamWork projects. This process can be replicated for other standardized or more intricate concrete structural elements. Calculating the principal stress patterns can be used to design and fabricate various material-efficient structural elements. These can range from standardized elements to customized slabs and walls. Since there are no off-cuts created in using FoamWork, the whole fabrication system has the potential to be zero-waste . Alongside minimizing material waste, the lighter masses of the structural elements allow for easy transportation, handling and assembly on construction sites. + Digital Building Technologies, ETH Zürich Photography by Patrick Bedarf

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How using 3D-printed foam can cut down concrete waste

Cute Gentoo penguin takes selfies in this amazing video

January 24, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Thanks to advances in technology,  penguins  can now take selfies. Like a snowboarder with a GoPro, a Gentoo penguin was able to document its twisting, diving, sardine gobbling, and general shredding through the waters off Tierra del Fuego, thanks to Argentinian scientists who fitted him with a special video camera. You can see the penguin rocketing through densely packed schools of fish, with other swimming shorebirds in the background. The rad video of an amped penguin is part of a study comparing the feeding ecology of  Argentina’s  Gentoo penguins with the yellow-eyed penguins of New Zealand. Hardcore penguin researchers at the  Tawaki Project  have teamed up with Antarctic Research Trust, Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and scientific and technical research group CADIC-CONICET to collaborate on the study. Related: New penguin ‘mega-colonies’ discovered in Antarctica The Gentoo penguin shot his video in the Beagle Channel off Isla Martillo, in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina. The Wildlife Conservation Society’s Argentina Program released it. “We were fascinated to see the Beagle Channel seabird community feeding on this amazing shoal of sardines,” said WCS researcher Andrea Raya Rey, who is also on the staff at CADIC – CONICET. “We wrote in many papers that the seabird community in the Beagle Channel rely on sardines but this is the actual proof, and now it is confirmed and with a star behind the camera: the penguin.” Gentoo penguins thrive around the Antarctic Peninsula. They stand about 27 to 35 inches tall, weigh 10-19 pounds, and are known for their diving prowess. They may dive 450 times in a single day, as deep as 650 feet, in their search for crustaceans,  fish  and squid. They can stay underwater for up to seven minutes. Gentoo penguins also like cleanliness. If last year’s nesting area is too messy, they find a new pristine area. Unlike many other penguin species , Gentoo penguins are expanding in distribution and population numbers. Via Newswise , Oceanwide Expeditions

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Cute Gentoo penguin takes selfies in this amazing video

Earth911 Podcast: Rich Razgaitis on the Future of Drinking Water

January 24, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco

The availability of safe, fresh drinking water will become a more pressing issue as the… The post Earth911 Podcast: Rich Razgaitis on the Future of Drinking Water appeared first on Earth911.

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Earth911 Podcast: Rich Razgaitis on the Future of Drinking Water

Canton Avenue harkens back to the Silk Road of China

January 21, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

The Canton Avenue by MOK Design for the Westin Pazhou Hotel in Guangzhou is a walk back in time, revisiting the days when the hotel was a stop on the historic Silk Road of China . The Westin Pazhou Hotel Guangzhou was jointly built by China Foreign Trade Center (Group) and Starwood Hotels and Resorts International Group. It is located in the center of the Guangzhou International Convention & Exhibition Center, with views of the city and the Pearl River. Entering in, the exhibition halls of the Canton Avenue can be reached through a sky corridor from the hotel directly. There are also a series of sunrooms and green space installations inside the hotel has integrated the renovated building into the surrounding landscape. Related: Grass-roofed arches and planted terraces bring nature into this modern bazaar in India A unique green lawn built into the lobby of the hotel brings daylight and air circulation indoors. There are also multiple floor and wall plantings that freshen the timeless design of the space. Central to the lobby is Canton Bazaar, an all-day garden restaurant and lobby bar combined with an outdoor sunroom. Decorated with mosaics and terrazzo floor, the sunroom was designed to combine a traditional and modern style. The space can accommodate up to 107 people for dining. Food in the Canton Bazaar follows a Cantonese food market theme. There are fresh ingredients reminiscent of the Canton Fair, the historical Maritime Silk Road, and the Lingnan culture of the Guangdong region. Most notable about the redesign is the use of green plants throughout, including the lobby and restaurant . The MOK Design team focused on both green spaces to create a healthy indoor environment and an update of the style to create a modern sleek take on the Silk Road. Details feature elements of porcelain, bronze and Cantonese embroidery. A hotel mosaic mural featuring ships sailing to port from around the world was originally created by contemporary artist Ms. Zhang Haiyan. She drew the manuscript of this mosaic mural with colored lead along with designer Li Yanfang. The manuscript was sent to an Italian mosaic factory to be used in the making of the wall mural. The main elements of the screen include: the Zhenhai Tower, bombax ceiba cotton-tree flowers, the harbor, Guangzhou Tower, merchant ships, seagulls and cloud patterns. It brings to mind the international sea trade that historically made this city a successful port. The hotel uses a neutral color palette and judicious use of quality ornamentation to evoke tranquility toward its visitors. There is thoughtful use of glass screens, greenery, marble and light and dark brown tones to balance the space. + MOK Design Photography by Zhang Jing and Weng Xiaodong

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Canton Avenue harkens back to the Silk Road of China

Urban Forest is set to be the greenest residential building

January 21, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Urban Forest designed by Koichi Takada Architects and developed by Aria Property Group received approval to be built in South Brisbane, Australia . The 20-storey building will house 194 apartments, all trimmed out with luscious vertical garden balconies. A large garden with walkways is planted under the open-sided street level of the building, creating a sort of walk-through botanical gardens for residents and pedestrians. Depending on the types of plants integrated into the final design, the Urban Forest could look like anything from a trim bonsai tree with the undulating, but neat, balconies wrapping the building on every side, to something more like the overgrown jungle temples of Cambodia. Related: Vincent Callebaut unveils bioclimatic LEED-Gold timber tower Additionally, the Urban Forest has columns beneath the building that are stacked in layers like a 3D-printed model and flow up into a base for the apartment levels of the building. Every balcony appears to be designed to be a slightly different shape or size than the one next to it, creating a natural, flowing effect that will complement the plantings. “By raising the podium, the ground level becomes an extension of the surrounding parklands, giving back to the community 1,642 square meters of public park ,” the designers said. A two-story rooftop clubhouse tops the residential building with phenomenal city views of Brisbane. The living façade features 550 trees and 25,000 plants selected from 251 native species. An information center in the lobby will include details on the design of the building and on plant biodiversity. The vertical gardens are designed to create shade and natural thermal and solar insulation for the apartment residents. The rooftop communal space has a swimming pool and other shared spaces for gathering. Its aim is to restore the idea of community and “breathing spaces” for social interaction and wellbeing to reduce the isolation of high-rise living. Koichi Takada Architects advocates for a more “living design” approach to building with the Urban Forest. It is set to be the world’s greenest residential building, targeting a 6-star Green Star rating. It will set a standard for sustainable and subtropical high-rise apartment buildings. “One takeaway from the COVID-19 pandemic crisis is the realization that we are all living things,” said Koichi Takada Architects. “We are here to live, not defy death in some way. Our architecture should do the same.” + Koichi Takada Architects Images via Binyan Studios

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Urban Forest is set to be the greenest residential building

Indoor-outdoor living drives this design for VAVA House

January 20, 2022 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Architecture takes a variety of forms and serves many purposes, but most people would agree that the best home is one that meets the family’s needs and lifestyle goals. To this end, VAVA House was designed to emphasize indoor-outdoor living through shared space and a connection to the outdoors.  Designed by Fivedot Architects, this Seattle , Washington home caters to the client’s desire for a space that reinforces family connection within the home and community relationships outside the home. Unlike most residential homes that open into the backyard, VAVA House opens outdoor living into the front yard where it can be shared with neighbors.  Related: Brutalist home in Puerto Rico is resistant to weather Inside, cozy coves beneath the staircase and in a narrow TV viewing area provide space for reflection and relaxation. Larger areas are equipped for group gatherings, whether that be family , neighbors or friends. In all, the house features four bedrooms, three bathrooms, an open floor plan throughout the main living area, a home gym, lounge, office and bonus room in a 3,643-square-foot space.  Out front, the home features an expansive patio with gathering areas, a custom-made wood swing, and heat sources such as a firepit and heater for year-round entertaining. The swing incorporates  recycled  roof joists from the previous home and souvenir hardware the clients brought back from India.  Plants  and landscaping surround the home, including a green roof and beds along the front yard and street. The theme continues with a custom plant rack for hydroponic growing. Previous concrete on-site is fashioned into the design to minimize water runoff and waste. Extensive solar panels produce renewable energy for the home. Fun, custom additions adorn the home. Prints of the children’s first steps are imprinted into the floor, and mural prints by Mario de Miranda decorate the walls. + Fivedot Images via Mark Woods

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Indoor-outdoor living drives this design for VAVA House

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