A treehouse made from sustainable wood hides a luxurious interior

November 1, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A treehouse made from sustainable wood hides a luxurious interior

The sustainable builders at ArtisTree are known for creating some seriously beautiful and green structures. The company has just unveiled a charming treehouse located in a remote eco-retreat in Texas. Perched 25 feet in the air between two cypress trees, the Yoki Treehouse is an exceptional example of the company’s artistry and deep respect for nature. Located in central Texas, the Yoki Treehouse is Austin’s first treehouse resort at Cypress Valley. Designed to be a luxury retreat, the  treehouse sits 25 feet above a creek, which served as the inspiration for the design and name (Yoki is the Hopi Native American word for rain). According to Will Beilharz, founder of ArtisTree, “Water is life — one of our most precious resources, and ArtisTree treehouses are designed to let people experience nature’s resources more intimately.” Related: World’s most active volcano harbors a tiny off-grid home — and you can stay overnight Built with sustainable woods such as elm, cypress and spruce, the treehouse holds court high up within the tree canopy.  The retreat is comprised of a 500-square-foot suspended treehouse and a separate bathhouse, which sits on solid ground. The two buildings are connected by a 60-foot-long suspension bridge with various platforms to provide plenty of open spaces for enjoying the surrounding nature. In the main house, this strong emphasis on nature is apparent at every angle. The entrance is located on the roof, which doubles as an observation platform perfect for enjoying the lush green forest views and the babbling brook. There is also an open-air porch where the branches grow through the floor, further connecting the structure into its environment. Inside, the walls of the treehouse are clad in a warm birch wood, creating a cabin-like aesthetic. Again, an abundance of windows, including an all-glass front wall, allows guests to reconnect with nature. The interior design and furnishings were inspired by Japanese minimalism, while touches of Turkish decor add a sense of whimsy. The separate bathhouse was built with solitude in mind. It features a spa-like atmosphere, complete with a large Onsen-style soaking bathtub. Ample floor-to-ceiling windows offer guests a serene spot to enjoy a bit of bird watching or stargazing. + ArtisTree Via Dezeen Photography by Smiling Forest via ArtisTree

View original here:
A treehouse made from sustainable wood hides a luxurious interior

Truly get away from it all at this gorgeous eco-resort and yoga retreat

August 1, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Truly get away from it all at this gorgeous eco-resort and yoga retreat

A lot of people consider “getting away from it all” going to Las Vegas, New York City , Tokyo or Dubai, but that’s really just getting away from where you are to immerse yourself in chaos, where the “all” is larger than ever. For the ultimate getaway, including no phones, TV, Wi-Fi, Starbucks, or air conditioning, head to Xinalani , a stunning yoga retreat near Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco, Mexico that will help you truly relax and unwind. Nestled between a flourishing jungle and the incredibly translucent Banderas Bay on the mighty Pacific Ocean, and just 12 miles down the beach from Puerto Vallarta, Xinalani is an isolated eco-resort. Here, you can enjoy having nothing to do except listen to the sound of crashing waves, relax on endless beaches with sand as fine as sugar and bask in so much sunshine you’ll think you can walk on it. Related: Thai eco-resort delights guests with woven pods and other sublime dwellings Although Xinalani is a serene hideaway aimed toward yoga aficionados, you don’t even have to own a pair of yoga pants to enjoy it to its fullest. It’s a foray into nature that offers sleeping and living quarters inside three-sided, palm-thatched cabins with nothing but a curtain separating you from the great outdoors. If you do love yoga, experience classes held in ideal settings in the Greenhouse, the Jungle Studio treehouse, the Sand Terrace or the Meditation Cabin. Typical rooms have amenities including al fresco showers, handcrafted writing desks and personal balconies with breathtaking vistas of Banderas Bay and the jungle. You can upgrade to a freestanding suite for privacy and luxuries like cozy pillow-top hammocks and beds as well as extravagant silk mosquito netting. Of course, no paradise would be complete without spa massages, pools and outstanding bars and restaurants — including a scrumptious breakfast buffet — scattered up and down the beach. Whether you visit Xinalani for the yoga or just for an unforgettable tropical excursion, you’ll leave feeling relaxed, refreshed and renewed. + Xinalani Via Dwell Images via Xinalani

Read the original: 
Truly get away from it all at this gorgeous eco-resort and yoga retreat

Massive eco-resort with a theme park to rise on Vietnams beaches

February 12, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Massive eco-resort with a theme park to rise on Vietnams beaches

The Vietnamese government has given the green light to Mui Dinh Ecopark, a massive eco-resort expected to become one of Asia’s largest hospitality and leisure developments. Designed by architecture firm Chapman Taylor’s Bangkok studio, the mega-project will span 1,800 acres and comprise seven hotels for a total of 7,000 rooms in addition to a theme park, 500 villas, casino, beach club, and mountain clubhouse. The project is envisioned as a “sustainable destination.” Set on southern Vietnam’s beautiful white sandy shores in Mui Dinh, the enormous eco-resort will take inspiration from the local area’s rich history while paying careful attention to the environment. Little has been revealed on how the massive development plans to reduce its environmental footprint, but the renderings provide some clues: the buildings appear to take cues from the local vernacular with thatched roofs and natural materials rather that concrete construction. The visuals also show an idyllic verdant setting thick with trees while the larger buildings take the form of rounded mountains. Related: Outstanding eco-friendly resort in China is made with recycled and locally-sourced materials “Set on a beautiful site on the east coast of Vietnam, Mui Dinh Ecopark is designed to reflect the key elements of the surrounding environment – sand, sea, salt and sun,” wrote the architects. “Intended as an unrivalled hospitality-led mixed-use development in Asia , the development is inspired by the rich local history of Mui Dinh, particularly that of the Cham tribal culture and architecture as well as the lost world of the last dynasty.” + Chapman Taylor Via ArchDaily Images via Chapman Taylor

See the original post:
Massive eco-resort with a theme park to rise on Vietnams beaches

David Chipperfield Architects reveal designs for Hamburgs tallest tower

February 12, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on David Chipperfield Architects reveal designs for Hamburgs tallest tower

Hot on the heels of Herzog & de Meuron’s recently completed Elbphilharmonie , David Chipperfield Architects has revealed designs for the German city’s next big architecture project: Elbtower. Towering above the skyline at 230 meters (755 feet), the sculptural mixed-use building will be the tallest building in the city and serve as a counterpoint to Elbphilharmonie to the west. David Chipperfield Architects’ designs for Elbtower won an international design competition that sought a building that was modern yet also captured the historic and unique character of the riverfront location. Its sculptural form features a long multi-level podium that then curves upwards to form a 230-meter-tall tower with tapered edges. The podium will comprise a bar, hotel, restaurant, retail, and exhibition areas. The building will also enjoy easy access to the train and underground station as well as a bicycle bridge. Related: Herzog & de Meuron’s Elbphilharmonie Plaza is the highest public square in northern Germany “We are delighted to have won the competition for the Elbtower project together with SIGNA and are happy to be invited to work in Hamburg again, especially on such an important site,” said David Chipperfield. “As architects we are increasingly aware that the city depends on the quality of projects from the private sector to create a strong civic dimension that engages with the complexities of the city. We look forward to positively embracing this responsibility with the Elbtower project.” The Elbtower will be sheathed in a specially designed glass facade equipped with lighting technology—designed by by Studio Other Spaces in collaboration with Olafur Eliasson and Sebastian Behmann—that will transform the building into a “kinetic sculpture” at night. + David Chipperfield Architects Via ArchDaily Images via David Chipperfield Architects

Here is the original post:
David Chipperfield Architects reveal designs for Hamburgs tallest tower

Outstanding eco-friendly resort in China is made with recycled and locally-sourced materials

January 22, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Outstanding eco-friendly resort in China is made with recycled and locally-sourced materials

The four pavilions of the Naked Gallery resort in China were built using a combination of locally available natural and recycled waste materials. Xiaohui Designer Studio designed the complex as an eco-friendly space that “includes 75% of sustainable and renewable materials , 75% recyclable materials, and 75% of work by local craftsmen.” The designers utilized locally available stones, the soil excavated from the other sites in the resort, and bamboos abundant at the foot of Mount Mogan where the resort is located. The materials of the formwork and the joists of Naked Gallery are collected from the waste materials from other structures, which helped reduce the generation of waste and alleviate the influence of the architecture on the natural environment. Related: Luscious eco-resort design in China inspired by the Silk Road The resort consists of four pavilions. Local craftsmen built the complex using traditional building techniques which helped cut construction costs and increase construction efficiency. In fact, the transportation fees and construction waste were both cut by 90% during the building process. + Xiaohui Designer Studio Via Archdaily Photos by Youkun Chen    

Original post: 
Outstanding eco-friendly resort in China is made with recycled and locally-sourced materials

Acoustic tractor beams could allow humans to levitate in the near future

January 22, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Acoustic tractor beams could allow humans to levitate in the near future

Researchers from the University of Bristol are taking us into the future with a new discovery that could pave the way for human levitation. The powerful new technology uses tractor beams of sound to levitate liquids or even large objects – like a human beings – in mid-air. It’s like something straight out of a science fiction movie. Up until now, acoustic tractor beams could only lift tiny objects – anything larger than the wavelength would become rapidly unstable. But this new technology utilizes acoustic vortices that shift rapidly to hold and move objects. It’s kind of like trapping an object in a powerful tornado of sound, with a silent eye and loud sound on the exterior. By quickly changing the rate of rotation, scientists can stabilize the tractor beam and even manipulate it to hold larger objects. Related: $70 DIY acoustic tractor beam moves objects with sound Besides being exciting in terms of sci-fi fun, the technology could also have some immediate useful applications like moving surgical instruments or drug capsules in the body. “In the future, with more acoustic power it will be possible to hold even larger objects. This was only thought to be possible using lower pitches making the experiment audible and dangerous for humans,” said Senior Research Associate Dr. Mihai Caleap. + Physical Review Letters Via Phys.org Images via Physical Review Letters

More: 
Acoustic tractor beams could allow humans to levitate in the near future

Visionary eco-resort design for the Philippines features rotating seashell towers

September 19, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Visionary eco-resort design for the Philippines features rotating seashell towers

Visionary eco-architect Vincent Callebaut has just unveiled images of his latest ecological masterpiece and it’s jaw-droppingly stunning. Nautilus is a futuristic 27,000-square-meter eco-resort designed for Palawan, Philippines. The beautiful self-sustaining complex, which would include various research centers, shell-shaped hotels and rotating apartment towers, is designed to be a shining example of how resilient tourism can allow travelers to discover the world without destroying it. Callebaut designed Nautilus to be a resilient, self-sustaining community that includes a series of rotating apartments and luxury hotels, along with a elementary school and sports center. Also on site would be a scientific research and learning center for travelers who’d like to collaborate with engineers, scientists, and ecologists in actively taking part in improving the local environment. It’s a pioneering collaborative concept focused on using real-world education to foster and spread the idea of responsible ecotourism –  or as the architect describes it – “a voluntary approach to reimburse ecological debt”. Related: Vincent Callebaut’s Twisting Citytree Towers Generate More Energy Than They Consume Using the principles of biomimicry , the design is inspired by the “shapes, structures, intelligence of materials and feedback loops that exist in living beings and endemic ecosystems.” The construction and operation of the complex would work under a “zero-emission, zero-waste, zero-poverty” ethos, using 100 percent reused and/or recycled materials from the surrounding area. All of the materials used in the construction would be bio-sourced products derived from vegetable biomass. Microalgae and linseed oil would be used to manufacture organic tiles, while any wood used would be locally-sourced from eco-responsible forests. Even the luxury lodgings would be self-sustaining, playing a strong role in the design’s net-zero energy profile. The main tourist village would be built on telescopic piles that produce ocean thermal energy as well as tidal energy. This energy, along with photovoltaic cells , would produce sufficient energy for the the village, which will also be installed with vertical walls and green roofs to increase the buildings’ thermal inertia and optimize natural temperature control. To the west, twelve small spiral towers with a total of 164 units are designed to be built on rotating bases that turn on their axis according to the course of the sun, fully rotating 360 degrees in one day, providing optimal views of the surrounding environment and taking advantage of a full day of natural light. On the east side, the complex would have 12 small snail-shaped “museum-hotels” constructed with recycled concrete . The hotels will feature various exhibition spaces on the bottom floors and guests rooms on the upper floors. At the heart of the resort will be Origami Mountain, slated to house a scientific research center and nautical recreation area. The building would be constructed using a Cross Laminated Timber framework that would be layered to create a number of undulating ramps that fold out like a massive origami structure. + Vincent Callebaut + Nautilus Eco-Resort Images via Vincent Callebaut

Originally posted here:
Visionary eco-resort design for the Philippines features rotating seashell towers

Luxury Tree Villa communes with breathtaking nature in India

August 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Luxury Tree Villa communes with breathtaking nature in India

A picture-perfect getaway roosts in the treetops of west India. Architecture BRIO completed the Tree Villa, a two-story luxury getaway on the cliff of a 160-acre “treesort.” Set within the rich river landscape of Tala near the Kuda caves, the treehouse -like glass dwelling offers an immersive experience within a forested tropical setting. Architecture BRIO built the Tree Villa around existing mature trees, which grow up and through the roof, deck, and fencing, and give the structure its treehouse-like appearance. The dwelling blends into its surroundings with its thatched roof , predominately timber palette, and clean modern design. The architects wrapped the elevated Tree Villa in full-height glazing to optimize views of Tala’s stunning scenery. Tie-dyed bordered sheer curtains filter harsh sunlight during the day. The Tree Villa accommodates four adults and two children. The elevated ground floor is surrounded by an expansive timber deck and comprises a large luxurious bedroom, bathroom with mirrored slats, and a spiral staircase to the upper floor. The larger upper level also features a large timber deck in addition to a second bedroom, loft bed for children, living area, kitchen, dining room, west-facing patio, and a semi-outdoor bathroom that’s dramatically pierced by the enormous brand of an old Garuga fruit tree. The modern and minimalist open-plan interior and lack of walls reinforces the immersive experience in nature. Related: Bamboo-Veiled Dormitory by Architecture BRIO The architects write: “The volumetric compositions of partly white, partly reflective and transparent surfaces within a wooden framework animate and lighten up the space. It questions conventional definitions of exterior and interior and reinterprets notions of privacy and exposure within a hospitality environment. The spatial composition in an otherwise traditional tropical roof structure lends a sense of softness, sensuality, intimacy and complexity, making it a perfect setting for a retreat into the wilderness of Tala.” + Architecture BRIO Via ArchDaily Images © Photographix

View post: 
Luxury Tree Villa communes with breathtaking nature in India

Costa Rica eco-resort combines jungle yoga with sustainable design

August 9, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Costa Rica eco-resort combines jungle yoga with sustainable design

NALU boutique hotel in Costa Rica is a sustainable jungle retreat for exercise and relaxation. Merging sustainability with local craftsmanship, architecture firm Studio Saxe designed a series of pavilions scattered amongst the trees, offering each occupant an extra sense of privacy. The hotel is located in Nosara, a burgeoning tourist destination for health, wellness and surfing. The owners, Nomel and Mariya Libid, wanted the design of the new building to reflect this attitude by offering several tranquil spaces for various types of recreation and exercise. Dense jungle completely surrounds the individual pavilion homes. The architects determined optimal positions for each of the structures by conducting extensive analyses of wind and sun patterns. Related: 8 gorgeous green hotels to add to your bucket list The timber roofs made of recycled Teak planks protrude over each pavilion to create shade from the intense equatorial sun. Corridors lit from the pergola roofs frame views of the lush surroundings and connect separate rooms. “Our project Nalu represents the power of simple, low-key, modern tropical architecture ,” says architect Benjamin Garcia Saxe. “It has quickly become a town favorite, which shows that there is a real desire to occupy spaces that bring people closer to nature, while addressing the needs of contemporary life,” he adds. + Studio Saxe Photos by Andres Garcia Lachner

View original here: 
Costa Rica eco-resort combines jungle yoga with sustainable design

Luscious eco-resort design in China inspired by the Silk Road

July 26, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Luscious eco-resort design in China inspired by the Silk Road

An existing native village in China is being transformed into a modern eco-resort that offers a variety of activities and spaces. Architects Jean Pierre HEIM and Carolyn HEIM of HEIMdesign approached the redesign of Sasseur eco-tourist village using “One Belt, One Road” development strategy that focuses on connectivity and cooperation among China and the rest of the world. The project will be implemented near the city of Chongqing– starting point of the Silk Road economic belt and the hub of a 21st century maritime Silk Road that connects the Chinese interior with the rest of the world. Taking advantage of the existing topography and incorporating an element of feng shui, the team divided the various buildings and facilities into categories like housing, entertainment, art etc. Related: Earthquake-Resistant Eco Village Wins Christchurch’s Breathe Competition The design combines traditional and contemporary elements, with references to the silk industry and raw silk production. The silk thread and the cocoon, the Mulberry tree and silk production in Chongqing are the inspirational elements for this project. The main idea was to keep the existing forms of the villages and existing homes and give a modern contemporary makeover. Included are a multi-media center, wellness and spa facilities , art galleries , green homes, a hotel and childcare facilities. + HEIMdesign

Read more:
Luscious eco-resort design in China inspired by the Silk Road

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 756 access attempts in the last 7 days.