Myanmars eco-friendly startup transforms trash into treasureand jobs

April 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Myanmars eco-friendly startup transforms trash into treasureand jobs

Trash is a big problem in Myanmar . Garbage is scattered in the streets with smells of burning trash never far behind—but an innovative social enterprise has found a way to turn that adversity into advantage. Tucked in the rural backwaters of Dala near Yangon city, ChuChu Design is an eco-friendly startup lifting families out of poverty with the art of upcycling . Created by Italian NGO Cesvi, the ChuChu project collects waste and teaches locals to transform trash into recycled crafts with an environmental message. With the opening of Myanmar’s economy, the fast-developing country is seeing a boom in population and consumerism but still lacks much of the infrastructure to support that growth. Absence of waste disposal options in many areas leads citizens to litter or burn their rubbish, creating toxic air pollution . With the lack of education about the environment, public acceptance of recycling and waste reduction practices remains low. ChuChu Design hopes to change that. Founded in 2014 with funding from the EU, the social enterprise is now a self-sustainable startup that teaches families how to upcycle trash into marketable crafts and currently employs 30 makers. To promote their products and message, managing directors Wendy Neampui and Friedor Jeske designed and built a workshop and showroom made largely of recycled materials . Located in Dala across the river from the country’s bustling commercial capital of Yangon, this trash-made shop shows off the potential of upcycling from its bottle-embedded walls to its beautiful products constructed of recycled materials. “We want to make job opportunities for those who have low income,” said Wendy Neampui to Inhabitat. “On the other side, we are involved with the environment. Now there are thirty people working here but not all are from Dala. Some are from Mwambi or outside of Yangon.” She gestures to the myriad of products lining the walls, including sturdy purses made of car inner tubes , potato chip bag wallets, belts made from bicycle tires , recycled wine bottle glasses, and even laptop slips woven from cement bags. The waste is usually sourced from a waste collector and downtown wholesale market or from locals hired to collect rubbish from the roadside. She continues: “We teach them how to make the designs here and then they make the products at home. Twice a week (Thursday and Saturday) we meet together here and they bring all the products they make at home and then we fix the price. The price depends on how long they worked on the product. We sell the products to our regular shops, customers, and weekend bazaar in Yangon.” Related: Off-grid solar could help everyone in Myanmar receive power by 2030 The workshop behind the showroom is filled with raw material, from piles of motorbike inner tubes to enormous plastic bags of all colors. Plastic bags are the most widely used raw material at ChuChu Design and the makers cut shapes out of different colored bags then use a machine to fuse the plastic together into sheets. The colorful patterned sheets are used for purses, pencil cases, laundry baskets and other products without the need for paint. Makers also experiment with new materials they gather from the dump. Wendy is even creating a traditional Burmese dress using a blend of cotton and recycled plastic on a loom. While Wendy does not believe ChuChu Design will dramatically change society, she hopes the project will gradually spread awareness. “Local people never buy these products because they know it is made from trash,” said Wendy, referencing the social stigma around recycled products. “Only foreigners buy. But the locals don’t notice this is our trash. We need a lot of awareness.” ChuChu Design sells its products at its showroom in Dala as well as in the Pomelo shop in Yangon, the weekend Yangon bazaar, and other locations with hopes of expanding to Bagan and Inle Lake and the online marketplace. You can contact ChuChu Design and learn more on their Facebook page . + ChuChu Design Images © Lucy Wang

Excerpt from:
Myanmars eco-friendly startup transforms trash into treasureand jobs

Architects transform barns into solar-powered workspaces for Dutch daredevil

April 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Architects transform barns into solar-powered workspaces for Dutch daredevil

Rotterdam-based architecture studio Instability We Trust transformed two barns into a set of contemporary workspaces for the famous Dutch daredevil, Wim Hof . Nicknamed “The Iceman” for his ability to withstand extreme cold, Hof commissioned the adaptive reuse project to house his training seminars on the health benefits of cold exposure and breathing techniques. Located in Barneveld in the eastern Netherlands, the solar-powered building juxtaposes two visually contrasting volumes: an “extraverted” glass house and an “introverted” wooden cave-like structure. The L-shaped building comprises two interconnected gabled structures with open and flexible interiors. The gabled glass house is almost entirely transparent with an “outward atmosphere which relates to the air,” whereas the gabled timber-clad structure has a “grounded atmosphere which relates to the earth.” Though the timber volume is without windows, its connection with the glass structure allows access to natural light . Large sliding doors open the volumes up the outdoors and permits natural ventilation. Related: Historic Dutch nursery transformed into stunning solar-powered home Vertical planks of larch sourced from the sawmill next door clad the enclosed cave-like volume. The two gabled end walls were custom-made from clay plaster to create a warm and earthy environment that, combined with the suspended light sculpture, makes the space ideal for meditation. Photovoltaic cells and thermal cells generate renewable energy on site. “A visually clean and calm appearance is accomplished by combining an array of different elements such as insulation, gutters, drainage pipes, sliding door rails, glass panels and structural beams into one carefully detailed wooden slatted element, almost like a click-on facade,” write the architects. + Instability We Trust Via ArchDaily Images via Instability We Trust , © Pim Top

More:
Architects transform barns into solar-powered workspaces for Dutch daredevil

Self-sustaining Cradle to Cradle mountain hut is designed to generate its own energy

June 15, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Self-sustaining Cradle to Cradle mountain hut is designed to generate its own energy

The Huba mountain hut puts a modern twist on traditional alpine architecture and comprises two main parts: a power module and a living module. In case of damage, each module can be separated and repaired independently. The Huba living module, made primarily from locally sourced fallen trees, sleeps up to four in collapsible beds and is also equipped with a wall heater, sink, and LED lighting. The Power Module, on the other hand, is made out of recycled aluminum and contains a wind turbine, made from recycled plastic using a method called roto-molding, and a battery. The roof is angled to optimize collection of rainwater, which is filtered and used for the sink, drinking, and outside shower. Related: These spectacular alpine cabins will awaken your inner adventurer The modules are designed for easily assembly and disassembly, and are strong enough to withstand harsh winds and heavy rainfall. The Huba could also be integrated with a rental app to give travelers easy access to information about Huba locations and the opportunity to recommend locations for future huts. “Huba as a system works to provide for users a simple, trustful system, in which the bigger number of smaller shelters can serve as a unified accommodation at different stages of travel,” writes the designer. “It is designed to promote sustainable, and circular design to the public, thus creating a better awareness of challenges and possibilities.” + Cradle to Cradle Product Design Challenge Images by Malgorzata Blachnicka

Read the original post:
Self-sustaining Cradle to Cradle mountain hut is designed to generate its own energy

Floating catamaran hotels are perfect for a low-impact getaway

April 5, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Floating catamaran hotels are perfect for a low-impact getaway

This project, developed by Salt & Water design studio, aims at promoting low-impact tourism on inland waters. Consisting of small, floating catamarans, the floating hotel is a perfect solution for tourism without any violation of the natural harmony of the place itself. Floating hotel consists of two different parts – a central floating base and multiple apartment catamaran units. The central floating construction consists of reception, restaurant, event hall, offices for staff and a café). Each apartment is an innovatively-designed catamaran which can be easily separated from the dock and navigated, allowing guests to choose the perfect location for their vacation. Each catamaran consists of a salon, a galley, a bathroom, a hall with storage space and a sleeping area. The main idea is to allow users to enjoy their visit through a navigation at a very slow speed and with an uninterrupted view of the nature around. For this reason the catamarans have this unusual shape with large windows in the front. Catamarans-apartments can be considered as “frames of the nature” – connecting the guests with the water and the sky and isolating them from the everyday’s stress. The design won the Millennium Yacht Design Award . + Salt and Water The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link. Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

Read more here:
Floating catamaran hotels are perfect for a low-impact getaway

BIG and Heatherwick unveil scaled-down designs for Google’s Mountain View HQ

April 5, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on BIG and Heatherwick unveil scaled-down designs for Google’s Mountain View HQ

Read the rest of BIG and Heatherwick unveil scaled-down designs for Google’s Mountain View HQ

View original post here: 
BIG and Heatherwick unveil scaled-down designs for Google’s Mountain View HQ

Bad Behavior has blocked 5527 access attempts in the last 7 days.