This LA startup turns spoiled milk into biodegradable T-shirts

July 16, 2020 by  
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Did you know that 128 million tons of milk are wasted every year? LA-based startup Mi Terro is using biotechnology to turn a portion of that food waste into sustainable fibers for biodegradable T-shirts. Transforming spoiled milk into clothing may seem like something from the future, but Mi Terro already has it down to a science. Using technology that re-engineers milk proteins, the company has invented a completely unique process that finds an innovative use for food waste and uses 60% less water than an organic cotton shirt. Related: This biodegradable T-shirt is made from trees and algae <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/Mi-Terro-6-889×661.jpg" alt="Two people wearing black T-shirts with graphic that reads "Mi Terro"" class="wp-image-2275202" The method was invented in just three months by co-founders Robert Luo and Daniel Zhuang. After visiting his uncle’s dairy farm in China in 2018, Luo saw just how much milk product gets dumped first-hand, and after some research, he found that the issue was one of a massive global scale. <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/Mi-Terro-3-889×592.jpg" alt="person holding yarn fibers made from old milk" class="wp-image-2275204" Step one is to obtain milk and other dairy products from farms, food processing centers and grocery stores. The company then uses “Protein Activation” and “Self-Assembly Purification” technology to extract and purify casein protein molecules from the spoiled milk bacteria. The last step is using “Dynamic Flow Shear Spinning” to spin the clean casein protein into eco-friendly fibers. <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/Mi-Terro-4.jpg" alt="machines spinning yarn" class="wp-image-2275203" Now, we’re sure you’re wondering what a shirt made from dairy feels like. According to the company, it is actually three times softer than cotton, anti-microbial, odor-free, anti-wrinkle and temperature-regulating. If that’s not enough, each T-shirt contains 18 amino acids that can nourish and improve skin texture. <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/Mi-Terro-2-889×667.jpg" alt="person wearing white T-shirt that reads, "This Tee Is Made From Milk"" class="wp-image-2275205" Mi Terro has also committed to planting 15 trees for every purchase. The company doesn’t want to stop there. Its innovative, patent-pending process can also be used to make other eco-friendly products and offer a sustainable substitute for plastic. The goal is to create a new type of circular economy powered by the agricultural waste that has become a growing problem in modern society. Even better, because the fiber is rescued from food waste and processed sans chemicals, it stays biodegradable even after it has reached the end of its second life. + Mi Terro Images via Mi Terro

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This LA startup turns spoiled milk into biodegradable T-shirts

Beachfront villa is split into two units for brothers to share

July 16, 2020 by  
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The Jesolo Lido Beach Villa is a beachfront, dual-unit building that exudes luxury yet incorporates energy efficiency throughout. Located in the resort area of Jesolo Lido, Italy, the split villa is the passion project by two brothers seeking to provide a beachfront getaway for their young families. <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/Jesolo-Lido-Beach-Villa-2-889×592.jpg" alt="long pool with cabanas on either side" class="wp-image-2275089" Like many other places, beachfront property isn’t easy to come by or to afford in this popular Italian area. So when the brothers found it, they jumped on the opportunity. But as it came time for construction, they had to get creative in order to share the limited, 11-meter buildable width of the property without sacrificing the personal space each family desired. To solve the problem, they sourced the expertise of the team at JM Architecture, a firm based out of Milan. Related: Beachfront hotel in Costa Rica pays tribute to the land and its inhabitants <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/Jesolo-Lido-Beach-Villa-3-889×592.jpg" alt="covered patio with gray furnishings" class="wp-image-2275088" <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/Jesolo-Lido-Beach-Villa-4-889×592.jpg" alt="villa with glass walls and extended roof eaves" class="wp-image-2275087" The architects began by respecting the wishes of the family to keep both sides of the project equal in size and amenities, creating two separate buildings that share the same symmetrical, two-bedroom two-bathroom layout and are identically furnished. The units share a beachfront, 16-meter, zero-edge swimming pool , and they also feature identical covered, custom-designed aluminum cabanas for poolside lounging with protection from the sun. <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/Jesolo-Lido-Beach-Villa-5-889×592.jpg" alt="small yard and long pool outside white and glass beach villa" class="wp-image-2275086" <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/Jesolo-Lido-Beach-Villa-6-889×592.jpg" alt="white room with gray sofa and wood coffee table" class="wp-image-2275085" Integral to the overall design is the use of photovoltaic panels integrated into the roof of the cabanas, which grant power to all the electrical heating and cooling systems. Using solar energy enhances other already efficient building elements, such as natural shade provided by existing trees in the white rock entrance to the building. According to the architects, they also considered noise pollution and privacy. “A large portion of the building envelope is cladded with 5 mm full-height gres tiles on a ventilated facade, to provide the necessary privacy to bedrooms and bathrooms,” the firm explained. “The north facade is entirely opaque in order to provide an acoustic boundary from the entry courtyard and the street behind.” <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/Jesolo-Lido-Beach-Villa-7-889×592.jpg" alt="blue chairs on a covered patio" class="wp-image-2275084" <img src="//inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2020/07/Jesolo-Lido-Beach-Villa-8-889×592.jpg" alt="two gray chairs in a cabana beside a pool" class="wp-image-2275083" With limited above-ground building space, the design took advantage of space underground with a basement level, where the families share a gym, sauna, hot tub, cold plunge pool, additional kitchen and laundry room. Large sunken patios clad with white glass mosaic tiles reflect light and offer natural cooling features in a space that is private to each unit. + JM Architecture Via ArchDaily Photography by Jacopo Mascheroni via JM Architecture

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Beachfront villa is split into two units for brothers to share

How to replace single-use and plastic items in the kitchen

May 15, 2020 by  
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Scientists are predicting that by the year 2050, the ocean may have  more plastic than fish . While countries around the world are beginning to take a stand against  single-use  items and plastics in grocery stores, restaurants and retail chains, there are still measures that consumers can take within their very own households.  The kitchen is one of the most notorious spots in the house for waste, whether it is food waste, excessive  plastic  usage or single-use materials. Swapping some of your everyday kitchen items with reusable or eco-friendly alternatives is a great way to get started on (or continue) your sustainable-living journey. Related: Cut plastic from your home and inspire your family to live plastic-free Ditch paper towels One of the easiest eco-friendly kitchen swaps comes in the form of the humble paper towel roll. Usually stored right next to the sink or the stove, grabbing a sheet or two is almost second nature to those who spend a lot of time in the kitchen. Invest in a stack of high-quality, reusable microfiber cloths for cleaning instead of reaching for a paper towel every time, and switch out paper napkins or paper towels with reusable cloth napkins. Simply toss them in the laundry basket and reuse. Swap out plastic wrap Plastic wrap has become essential in the kitchen for keeping food fresh and wrapping up leftovers (because no one wants to  waste food ). The handy alternative of reusable beeswax wrap is making huge waves in the sustainable-living community, and for good reason. You can wrap pretty much anything in beeswax wrap that you would normally use plastic wrap for, and the food will stay just as fresh. One of our favorite brands,  Bee’s Wrap , is made with organic cotton, beeswax, organic jojoba oil and tree resin. It is washable, reusable, compostable and comes in different sizes and specialty wraps for bread, sandwiches and more. Replace parchment paper and aluminum foil A reusable mat or roasting sheet is a great alternative to parchment paper or tin foil, especially for baking. Non-stick  silicone  mats can be reused thousands of times in lieu of oil, which is especially handy for those who are trying to stick to certain diets. Take proper care of it, and a good silicone mat can last for years! Nix plastic baggies Plastic sandwich baggies come in handy for packing lunch and smaller food leftovers. With a little extra effort, a couple of re-sealable silicone bags can be just as convenient and rewarding. It is also a nice way of introducing sustainable living to your children by teaching them to bring the reusable bags back home instead of tossing  disposable plastic  ones in the trash like most of their friends. Substitute plastic containers Swap out your cheap plastic Tupperware for tempered glass containers. Tempered glass containers keep food fresh and are  non-toxic , recyclable and food-safe (even in the freezer). Opt for a collection of compact, lightweight containers with easy-seal lids. Even better, since most types of tempered glass used for food storage containers have been treated to withstand heating, most are microwavable and dishwasher safe. Trade out plastic coffee pods When these little pods first came into the market, it seemed too good to be true for busy consumers eager to skip a step or two in their morning coffee routine. However, most plastic single-use coffee pods such as K-Cups and Nespresso Pods end up in landfills or oceans rather than being recycled. This plastic pollution is small enough to quickly break down into microplastics that have the potential to harm wildlife. In contrast, refillable coffee pods can be cleaned and reused daily. For those who compost, several companies are also beginning to make biodegradable and compostable pods available. Upgrade from plastic ice packs Swap out your plastic or disposable ice packs for stainless steel ones for use in lunch boxes or coolers. The stainless steel packs are filled with distilled water and freeze in just a few hours, so you can easily use them for your child’s lunches or keep one in the freezer for achy muscles. The material makes them  100% recyclable  at the end of the product’s lifespan.  Try out sustainable sponges Most kitchen sponges are made of polyester or nylon, giving them a considerable environmental footprint, especially if used daily. There are several alternatives to sponges out there for those who want to make the switch to a more  sustainable  dish-washing option. Try out cloth or reusable sponges and silicone scrubbers instead, or use a natural or plant-based compostable sponge. There are also machine washable cotton sponges on the market as well as copper scours that can be recycled. Forget the plastic grocery bags Plenty of Americans have already made the switch to reusable shopping or grocery bags (some states are even making them mandatory). Smaller plastic bags used for bulk items and produce are still popular, however. A couple of reusable and washable produce bags like  these  will greatly decrease your plastic use, especially if you eat a lot of fruits and veggies . Make sure you purchase bags with the tare weight on the tag so your grocer can easily find it for weighted items. Lose the plastic soap bottles Dishwashing soap blocks produce a lather that cuts grime and grease on dishes just as well as the liquid dish soap that comes in plastic containers. The popular  No Tox Life  vegan dish soap block is made of moisturizing coconut oil that won’t dry out your hands and also claims to take stains out of laundry and clean countertops. With alternatives like these, you can make a strong effort toward lowering your single-use plastic consumption. Images via Pexels, Pixabay, Randy Read , and Kevin Casper

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How to replace single-use and plastic items in the kitchen

‘Beads’ Art Installation Made From Recycled Plastic Bags Pops Up in Israel

November 5, 2013 by  
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‘ Beads ‘ is a community art installation made of used plastic bags that is located in a shopping center in Zichron Ya’akov, Israel. For a period of 2 months Noa Mer and Tali Buchler held an open activity for the public in a central location of the mall. Mer and Buchler developed a plastic bags sculpting method that is simple enough for kids to do. They used this method to make ‘beads’ that are strung together into necklaces to form an installation that looks somewhat like a pendant necklace or a chandelier. The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Read the rest of ‘Beads’ Art Installation Made From Recycled Plastic Bags Pops Up in Israel Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: beads , eco-art , green design , Israel , Noa Mer , plastic bags , Recycled Materials , recycled plastic bags , sustainable art , sustainable design , Tali Buchler , zichron ya’akov        

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‘Beads’ Art Installation Made From Recycled Plastic Bags Pops Up in Israel

Rainer Mutsch Uses Recycled Fiber to Create His Incredible Sculptural Pendant Lamps

November 5, 2013 by  
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These gorgeous, handmade ‘soft light’ pendants by Austrian designer  Rainer Mutsch are sculpted from eco-friendly materials. Mutsch created a series of pendants for Molto Luce from recycled fiber cement, using water and cellulose fibers to create a clean and modern aesthetic. Natural cellulose fibers are minimally processed for low impact, and the recycled fiber cement is highly durable and non-flammable. +  Rainer Mutsch Via Eco Nesting Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “lighting design” , Austrian design , cellulose fibers , eco-friendly materials , green furniture design , green lighting , handmade lighting pendants , Molto Luce , Rainer Mutsch , recycled fiber cement        

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Rainer Mutsch Uses Recycled Fiber to Create His Incredible Sculptural Pendant Lamps

120 Sq Ft Small Studio Wrapped in Reclaimed Redwood Chills in Sunny California

July 18, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of 120 Sq Ft Small Studio Wrapped in Reclaimed Redwood Chills in Sunny California Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: backyard studio , eco design , eco-friendly materials , green design , John McBride , no voc paint , Reclaimed Materials , salvaged materials , sarah deeds , sustainable design , tiny homes        

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120 Sq Ft Small Studio Wrapped in Reclaimed Redwood Chills in Sunny California

Chamfer Home: Tiny Self-Sufficient House Operates Off-Grid in Any Locale

June 14, 2013 by  
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The Chamfer Home is a tiny self-sufficient shelter with a clean modern design that is made from eco-friendly materials. Designed by S-Archetype , the portable living unit can operate completely off the grid, which means that it can be anchored just about anywhere – from a city rooftop to a patch of sand near the beach. Read the rest of Chamfer Home: Tiny Self-Sufficient House Operates Off-Grid in Any Locale Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “energy efficiency” , Architecture , Daylighting , eco-friendly materials , mobile home , S-Archetype , self-sustained , The Chamfer Home , tiny homes , Tselios Chrysanthopoulos        

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Chamfer Home: Tiny Self-Sufficient House Operates Off-Grid in Any Locale

Anders Stai Fougner Creates Rectangular Headphones Made from Wood

June 14, 2013 by  
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Created by Anders Stai Fougner , a 19-year old student from Oslo, Norway, these cool-looking headphones boast a rectangular shape that makes them stand out amongst the bunch of boring earbuds and conventional headphones. Dubbed Wood.Head.Phones, as the name suggests, these unique headphones are made completely out of wood and are custom handmade to suit their users. Currently, Fougner is looking for funding to bring these beauties into full production. + Anders Stai Fougner Via Damn Geeky The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Anders Stai Fougner , cool headphones , rectangular headphones , square headphones , weird headphones , wood headphones        

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Anders Stai Fougner Creates Rectangular Headphones Made from Wood

Mesmerizing Guangyun Pavilion in China Inspired by London’s Underground Rush Hour

June 14, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Mesmerizing Guangyun Pavilion in China Inspired by London’s Underground Rush Hour Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Architecture , blue lights , china , green events , green shade , Guangyun Entrance Pavilion , International Horticultural Expo , London Underground , PLASMA Studio , steel structure , web-like structure , xi’an        

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Mesmerizing Guangyun Pavilion in China Inspired by London’s Underground Rush Hour

Vasileios Roumeliotis Transforms an Old Bike Wheel Into a Beautiful LED Lamp

June 14, 2013 by  
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Vasileios Roumeliotis transformed an old bike tire into this beautiful Wheel Light for Roumelight . This lamp is made from a recycled bicycle wheel set on a black glass surface which acts as a canvas, showcasing the play of light and shadow. The Wheel Light can be illuminated by a striking circle of 18 dimmable bulbs (G4) or a hidden length of perimetric LED tape that gives off soft ambient light. The lighted wheel represents both a green method of transportation and an enlightened forward movement full of inventive ideas and creativity. + Roumelight Via Decoholic Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bicycle , bike , bike parts , bike wheel , green design , green interiors , recycled bicycle wheel lamp , recycled bike parts , Recycled Materials , Roumelight , sustainable design , Vasileios Roumeliotis , wheelight        

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Vasileios Roumeliotis Transforms an Old Bike Wheel Into a Beautiful LED Lamp

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