Minimalist hotel gym made out of locally-sourced stone features one of the largest glass panels in the world

November 5, 2019 by  
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UK architecture firm  Invisible Studio has become known for its ground-breaking low-impact designs , but this time the innovative architects have just unveiled a beautiful structure that manages to combine sustainability with elegant minimalism. To put it simply, “Room in a Productive Garden” is a small hotel gymnasium made out of natural stone with a large window that looks out over a vegetable garden. However, even though it may just appear to be a big window, it is, in fact, one of the largest glass panels in the world! The new project is part of an expansion of a hotel in Somerset. Located on  the grounds of Hadspen House, the single-story 1,600-square-feet room is a bright and airy gymnasium where guests can enjoy a nice workout while taking in the serene view of the vegetable garden out front. Related: This tiny timber cabin was built from construction waste for under $30K The small gym was strategically designed to blend into its natural surroundings. It’s minimalist volume was intentional to reduce the project’s impact on the landscape. Additionally, the designers used natural stone sourced on site to create the exterior cladding. The stone was crushed and rammed into the walls to add an earthy tone to the facade. According to the architectural studio, the eco-friendly building was “conceived in a manner as ‘no building’ – more, a window on to a mature productive garden with as few distractions from the garden as possible,” they explain. “The garden provides food for the hotel, and is an important part of the arrival experience into the gymnasium. At the heart of the design is the massive glass window , which not only lets in optimal light into the workout space, but also provides serene views of the surrounding nature. At 50 feet wide and 10 foot tall, the continous glass panel is one of the largest in the world. The interior of the building is also an example of sophisticated minimalism . The gym walls are lined entirely in beech wood, with slats concealing the lighting and ventilation systems. At the base of the glass panel, there is a long continuous bench for those who would like to take in the unobstructed views calmly versus running on the treadmill. + Invisible Studio Via World Architecture Images via Invisible Studio

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Minimalist hotel gym made out of locally-sourced stone features one of the largest glass panels in the world

Sead Pod offers grassroots solution to air pollution and global warming

November 5, 2019 by  
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Gardening should be good for the environment, adding oxygen to the air, nutrients to the soil and filtering water for consumption. But plastic and toxins have become ubiquitous, leaving the home gardener to make intentional choices about which products to use. That’s where Sead Pod comes in, a vertical garden made using sustainable practices and recycled materials . Sead (Sustainable Ecology, Adaptive Design) Pod offers a simple plastic planter for bringing gardens into the smallest spaces while reusing plastic, which is problematic for the environment. The pod simply clips on to any chain link fencing, providing water efficiency from the vertical garden design while diverting plastic from the landfill. Related: This self-sustaining planter doesn’t require sunlight for plants to thrive “The Sead Pod represents a new way of thinking about green design in an urban context,” said Bryan Meador, Plant Seads’ Founder and Chief Design Officer. “By reimagining existing architectural elements like chain link fencing as a tool in the fight against climate change, we’re able to leap into the green movement immediately, fighting climate change at the grassroots level and making our cities cleaner, healthier, and more livable—right now.”  Based in Kingston, New York, Meador is familiar with the limitations of urban gardens so he designed the Sead Pod to jump start the urgency of climate change. What he described as “the sluggish response of government and multinational companies” lead him to take action, experimenting with 3d printing and rapid prototype development to finalize the design . Proving his self-labeled impatience, Meador had the Sead Pod designed, manufactured and released in less than nine months. “Our generation is the first to be born into Climate Change. This crisis is not hypothetical to us, and we’re tired of waiting around for others to address this issue in a meaningful way,” Meador said in a press release.  With lofty goals of tackling CO2 emissions at a grassroots level, the Sead Pod gives everyone the ability to contribute to the solution. Imagine every chain link fence in your community covered in greenery and you begin to see the potential. The pods also connect to chain link material the size of a picture frame and Sead Pod offers five sizes of sead frames to suit the needs of every home and office. They are designed to be durable for long-term use even when exposed to harsh elements, not to mention, they are recyclable at the end of their life cycle. This project will only be funded if it reaches its goal by Thursday, October 31, 2019 8:59 PM PDT. + Plant Seads Images via Plant Seads

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Sead Pod offers grassroots solution to air pollution and global warming

This plant-based ski wax keeps nasty chemicals off the snowpack

October 1, 2019 by  
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For those looking to hit the slopes as the weather cools down, a new eco-friendly ski wax will not only help you glide through the fluffy snowpack but will also help keep the environment free of the dangerous chemicals found in most ski waxes. In a world where nearly all ski wax is made from petroleum, the innovative MountainFLOW eco wax is made entirely from plants. The sight of white snow-covered hills is enough for most skiers to call off of work and hit the slopes, hopefully in a sustainable retreat . But whatever we put on our skis quickly enters the snowpack, eventually making its way into local streams and rivers. Considering that most ski wax is made out of petroleum, this means that pollution during the ski months increases substantially for these water systems. Related: Top 6 sustainable winter resorts for snowboarding and skiing in the US Thankfully, the eco-conscious team at MountainFLOW has kicked off a new Kickstarter campaign to announce the launch of North America’s only line of plant-based ski wax . Designed to keep harmful chemicals out of the environment, this eco-friendly product is rapidly catching the attention of the ski world. Over the years, the team has worked to develop a petroleum-free wax that offers the same hydrophobicity, durability and ease of application that most traditional petroleum-based waxes offer. Not only have they created a product that does just that, but they have created a ski wax that is much better for the environment. Other plant-based ski waxes have been made with soy. Although the MountainFLOW wax does include a little bit of soy, the eco-friendly product uses a high-quality combination of other plant-based waxes that offer a faster, more durable product. The MountainFLOW packaging is also made from 100 percent recycled materials and is completely biodegradable. + MountainFLOW Images via MountainFLOW

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This plant-based ski wax keeps nasty chemicals off the snowpack

Tuck into these off-grid meditation cabins proposed for rural Latvia

January 8, 2019 by  
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Bee Breeders and Lauku Tea have recently announced winners of their Silent Meditation Forest Cabins competition, an open international contest seeking designs for off-the-grid meditation cabins in rural Latvia. Launched in search of eco-friendly and cost-effective proposals for compact and easily replicable cabins, the competition asked designers to propose a series of all-season cabins that could comfortably house a single person for nearly a week, have enough room for meditation activities and food storage and incorporate alternative lighting options and a heating system. The winning proposals will be considered for construction. Keep reading to see the top three winning entries. First prize was given to designer David Florez and Stefani Zlateva for the Solo Cabin, a timber-clad building comprising three stacked and staggered 2-by-2-meter spaces symbolic of the “various layers of nature,” namely the forest floor, the understory and the canopy. The tall structure is centered on an atrium that’s flooded with natural light thanks to a roof made from polycarbonate sheets. Further tying the project to the environment, the proposed construction recalls techniques found in traditional Latvian architecture. In second place is Nest, a proposal by Marko Simsiö of the University of Oulu. Designed as a treehouse , the cabin is elevated into the canopy and clad in charred wood to blend it into the bark of the surrounding trees. In contrast, the interior is lined with light spruce and minimally decorated. The jury praised the design for its low-impact approach. Related: 8 cabins that are perfect for a dreamy winter getaway A team from Wroclaw University of Science and Technology took third place with Aesthesia, a proposal that consists of three rectilinear cabins. Each cabin is made up of a series of modules, half of which cater to the basic necessities while the other half are used as a meditation zone with three different rooms. Large windows frame views of the outdoors. + Bee Breeders Images via Bee Breeders

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Tuck into these off-grid meditation cabins proposed for rural Latvia

9 eco-friendly ‘man caves’ for dudes and dads to get away from it all

June 29, 2017 by  
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Ah, the “man cave” – a place for dudes and dads to find solitude, tinker, build or read. Although the term may conjure up images of dank basements and wood-paneled rec rooms, the modern man cave has much more to offer. From prefabricated backyard pods and minimalist A-framed cabins to a futuristic voice-activated sphere in the sky, we’ve rounded up 9 inspiring ideas for men looking to get away from it all and recharge their batteries. 1. Prefabricated, versatile backyard getaway The Backyard Room is only available in Australia at the moment, but, logistics aside, it’s the perfect solution for creating a separate space without the need for moving or funding a pricey (and intrusive) home renovation. The prefabricated structure is built from renewable materials with high standards including LEDs and insulated roof and walls. It only takes a week to install this space-maximizer; calculate another few days to add on a green roof for the ultimate backyard eco-haven. 2. Man cave for a man-in-training For the young at heart, this man cave features pinball machines, a pool table, and a skateboarding bowl as well as a fully loaded tv and movie-viewing area. Designed and built for a very fortunate Cape Town teen, this space is a dream for men who want to go from shredding on their skateboard to playing video games to lounging with friends. There’s no need to leave the premises, especially when Mom and Dad’s stocked kitchen is just a few feet away. 3. Solar-powered, voice-activated Skysphere Image via Jono Williams Because having a regular, old man cave isn’t sufficient, Jono Williams concocted one of the craziest ones we’ve ever seen: a solar-powered sphere in the sky with electronics that operate on voice command. Williams designed and built the Skysphere himself (with a little help from friends), taking classes and learning a variety of topics to ensure that the Skysphere would be safe and structurally sound. While it’s awesome that he can say the word and custom LED lights change color or motorized doors open to cool the space down, it’s even more impressive that these awesome features are a result of educating himself and working until he had the dream space he wanted. 4. Cabin by the lake with a 55-year history This lakeside retreat isn’t truly tiny, but it began that way 55 years ago when an 18-year-old commenced construction on a 14-square-foot bunk house. That teen with a vision grew up to be Jim Olson, an accomplished architect . Over more than five decades, the cabin grew too, continually and gradually transforming into the picturesque getaway that it now is. Olson took care to build his outdoor deck around three trees to allow for their continued growth; a palette of woods used in the cabin’s interior as well as floor-to-ceiling windows make the space appear integrated into its gorgeous surroundings. Related|Build your own tiny home or treehouse with these stackable wooden micro-units 5. Modern micro-cabin made from recycled parts We love this 3-D printed micro-cabin , and we hope you will too. Dutch architects created the “Urban Cabin” using mostly recycled components and a sustainably produced and sturdy bioplastic frame. There’s enough room for a bed, which can also be folded into seating to leave room for Dad to tinker with other projects (or even set up a little table to serve as a mini office). A 3-D printed tub doesn’t fit inside the structure itself, but can be placed just outside. 6. Book nook nestled in nature For bibliophiles, this timber cabin is a green dream come to life. Felled oak trees that were left over from a separate construction project were repurposed into the bones of this tiny retreat, which was crafted using a Lincoln log-like method that created natural internal bookshelves and window spaces. This sublime upstate New York space is perfect for every season, although the wood-burning stove makes it the ideal place to snuggle up for a long winter’s nap. Image via Rok Pezdirc 7. Cabin among the trees This cozy cabin on stilts reminds us of a kiddie treehouse all grown up and elevated (literally). Inside there’s everything one would need for some R & R including a chair, storage units that double as a bed foundation, and a table. An outdoor deck offers optimal views, but between the skylights and numerous windows, the divide between inside and outside is minimal. Untreated timber forms the interior and exterior, but the space is surprisingly refined and could even serve as an office space. Image via Carolyn L. Bates 8. Wheelchair accessible tiny home with a mobile base Wheelchair accessibility is unfortunately not typically high on the list of specifics when designing tiny homes; the struggle to use every nook , cranny, and spare inch often supersedes an effort to make the space friendly to persons with mobility issues. Wheel Pad , designed with input from home health nurses, physical and occupational therapists, and doctors, aims to change that precedent. The home maximizes the available 200 square feet with a spacious and accessible bathroom, a wheelchair-level desk set-up and fixtures, and large windows to fill the home with natural light. 9. A-frame eco hut with a tiny footprint A-frame cabins by Lushna are reminiscent of human-sized bird houses, and they even come ready for some up-close-and-personal nesting: each has a king-sized mattress and was designed with four season living in mind. The prefab cabins are comprised of locally sourced larchwood and can be customized to include an outdoor wooden hot tub , curtains, or even a luxurious suite version with bathroom facilities and a mini kitchen.

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9 eco-friendly ‘man caves’ for dudes and dads to get away from it all

11 Innovative planters for the home

October 13, 2015 by  
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Inhabitat’s Top 6 Design Stories of 2013 – Vote for Your Favorite!

December 27, 2013 by  
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In 2013, architects and designers went above and beyond to push the boundaries of design and build a more sustainable future. But it wasn’t all glossy skyscrapers and high-profile projects – in the past year we showcased the world’s first vertical forest and one of the world’s coolest tiny apartments , while IKEA opened up new possibilities by launching the first augmented reality catalog . Check out our top design stories of 2013 below, and make sure to vote for your favorite! Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll. Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , 2013 best designs , 2013 best in design , best of design 2013 , eco-friendly design , green architecture , Green Building , green design , green products , sustainable design , top 6 design stories , top 6 inhabitat stories , top design stories 2013 , top design stories of 2013 , top designs 2013        

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Inhabitat’s Top 6 Design Stories of 2013 – Vote for Your Favorite!

Upcycle Goods Launches iPad Sleeves Made From Salvaged Treadmill Belts

July 11, 2013 by  
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These new Upcycle Goods Rubber Tread iPad Sleeves are handcrafted in Seattle, WA by local skilled artisans who really care about what they are making. The rubber tread is sourced from a local treadmill belt manufacturer that was tossing the excess rubber into landfills. Upcycle Goods rescued the material, re-engineered it, and lined it with a soft, plush USA-made felt lining. The finished cases are functional, durable and the perfect fit for any iPad owner who is excited about keeping local factories humming and the landfills just a little less full. + Upcycle Goods The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco-friendly design , green accessories , green design , green products , ipad case , ipad sleeve , Recycled Materials , recycled rubber , sustainable accessories , sustainable design , Upcycle Goods        

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Upcycle Goods Launches iPad Sleeves Made From Salvaged Treadmill Belts

Erik Maki’s Sustainably Made Longboards Look and Ride Like Surfboards

December 14, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Erik Maki’s Sustainably Made Longboards Look and Ride Like Surfboards Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: alternative transportation , California , eco-friendly design , Erik Maki , handmade , hardwoods , Maki Longboards , skateboards , Sustainable , sustainable forested

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Erik Maki’s Sustainably Made Longboards Look and Ride Like Surfboards

Sanserif Creatius’ Recycled Cardboard Chair Hides a Footrest and Table In Its Seat

March 29, 2012 by  
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This awesome recycled cardboard armchair from Sanserif Creatius is a curvy and comfortable piece that maximizes space by concealing a separate footrest and coffee table within its seat. Dubbed ‘Prejudice’, the chair incorporates three elements in one using 100% recycled cardboard as its base material. The new chair joins the Valencian designers’ already sizeable collection of sustainable designs. Read the rest of Sanserif Creatius’ Recycled Cardboard Chair Hides a Footrest and Table In Its Seat Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “green furniture” , eco-friendly design , Prejudice Cardboard Chair , recycled card furniture , Recycled Materials , sanserif creatius , sustainable design

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