This eco-friendly bamboo restaurant was built in just 5 weeks

July 12, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Crystal-blue waters, luxury accommodations and tropical appeal aren’t the only draws of Sundy Praia , São Tomé and Príncipe’s first five?star resort. The sustainably minded destination is also home to an award-winning restaurant designed by French architect-designer agency D.L.2.A (Didier Lefort Architectes Associés). Crafted in the shape of a large fish, the restaurant features a bamboo structure that was mainly assembled by hand and built in just five weeks. Located in the Gulf of Guinea off the western coast of Africa, Sundy Praia on the island of Príncipe was created with low-impact luxury in mind. Hidden among tropical almond and banana trees are the resort’s 15 tented villas, each anchored into the ground with retractable screws to reduce impact on the forest. In keeping with this eco-friendly ethos, designer Didier Lefort created a bamboo restaurant that uses local craftsmanship and materials. Related: Bamboo community center empowers the local Brazilian community Crafted to resemble a large fish with an undulating spine and a wide-open mouth, the building structure comprises a series of bamboo arches of varying dimensions that are fastened by hand with natural ties and only bolted at key areas. Measuring 24 meters from head to tail, the restaurant can accommodate up to 100 people inside and on the terrace. The undulating size of the restaurant — from its width to its height — creates spaces for different guests. The narrowest end of the restaurant, for instance, is for VIPs who wish to dine quietly, while the large “belly” area accommodates families. The “mouth of the fish” at the entrance is a popular place for couples wanting to dine by candlelight.  The interior of the restaurant is also dressed in locally crafted products, such as the chandeliers braided from bamboo and inspired by fishermen creels and the large curtains that are held together by strings of large seeds. The long buffet tables are designed by the D.L.2.A agency. + D.L.2.A Photography by Géraldine Bruneel via D.L.2.A

Read the original:
This eco-friendly bamboo restaurant was built in just 5 weeks

Eco-friendly prefab social housing in France is built from wood and straw

June 27, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Eco-friendly prefab social housing in France is built from wood and straw

Earlier this year, the commune of Nogent-le-Rotrou in northern France gained a new social housing development that’s not only an inspiring example of beautiful affordable housing, but is also a model for eco-friendly architecture. Designed by Paris-based architectural firm NZI Architectes, the project comprises thirteen gable-roofed homes built from prefabricated timber wall components with straw insulation. Separated into three blocks, the houses are arranged in staggered rows and feature varying roof heights and finishes to create visual appeal. Spanning an area of 11,840 square feet, the homes in the social housing development were constructed in a factory off-site. Prefabricating the walls in a controlled warehouse environment not only minimized construction waste, but also helped save time and money. Since the panels were relatively lightweight, the construction team was able to forgo a heavy-duty crane and instead used light lifting equipment to assemble the homes. Related: Cambridge’s first co-housing development fosters sustainable living “By opting for the construction of wood & straw, biosourced construction is favored, which limits the use of unsustainable resources,” explain the architects, who also used straw for insulation due to the material’s durability and effectiveness. “The constructive advantage of wood and straw construction compared to the traditional wooden structure and MOB wood frame walls is the possibility of complete prefabrication of the wall. The low weight of the wooden structure and straw allows the production of large areas of factory walls.” The thirteen houses are grouped into three blocks—named Block A, Block B, and Block C—with four to five houses each. Blocks A and C are identical mirror images of one another while the central block B is slightly set back from the other two blocks. The houses in each block are arranged in staggered rows to create opportunities for green space. The minimalist , light-filled interiors embrace views of the green space with large windows and tall ceilings. + NZI Architectes Images © Juan Sepulveda Grazioli

Continued here: 
Eco-friendly prefab social housing in France is built from wood and straw

A Victorian cottage gets a stylish and sustainable makeover

January 17, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on A Victorian cottage gets a stylish and sustainable makeover

In one of its latest eco-conscious retrofits, Australian architecture firm Green Sheep Collective has given a single-fronted timber Victorian cottage a sustainable transformation in inner Melbourne. The renovation and expansion project combined recycled and eco-certified materials with low-tech, passive solar principles to reduce the carbon footprint of the home while improving livability. Filled with light and contemporary flourishes, the updated house — named Magnolia Soul — has also been designed to embrace the outdoors. Commissioned by a young family with pets, Magnolia Soul was designed with an emphasis on spacious indoor-outdoor living as well as healthy and eco-friendly materials. During the renovation, the architects preserved a mature magnolia tree — a stunning Magnolia x soulangeana — and turned it into a main focal point. In addition to the tree, the existing property conditions also informed the building’s siting, mass and volume, which were all optimized to follow passive solar principles. Moreover, the building footprint is minimized in favor of maximizing the garden area. “A unique folding roof form envelopes and cradles robust living spaces, whose lowered floor level is embraced by adjacent decking,” the architects explained, having created a flexible open-plan interior layout with strong sight lines to the outdoors. “Views of the magnolia tree are intentionally framed by the roof structure, through a high-angled window and bay window seat. The generous and versatile window seat creates a lovely place to relax, read a book, admire the flowering magnolia or sit on the edge of the garden. High angular ceilings offer views of the magnolia, allow dappled light to penetrate deep into the residence and provide stack effect ventilation.” Related: Smart Home targets affordability and eco-friendly design in Australia The home is oriented for optimal thermal comfort : north-facing windows draw in natural heat for winter, while deep eaves and strategically placed windows for cross ventilation combat unwanted summer heat gain. Low-E double glazing and effective insulation also accommodate a temperate climate. Recycled, low-emission and ethnically procured materials were used wherever possible. For added resource savings, the home is equipped with a rainwater tank that reuses roof runoff for the laundry and toilets. + Green Sheep Collective Photography by Emma Cross via Green Sheep Collective

See the rest here:
A Victorian cottage gets a stylish and sustainable makeover

Eco-friendly guesthouse in Brazil sports a green roof and rammed earth walls

January 2, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Eco-friendly guesthouse in Brazil sports a green roof and rammed earth walls

In continuation of its work on the eco-conscious Camburi community center , Sao Paulo-based architecture firm CRU! architects recently completed the Guesthouse Paraty, a sustainable social building project that provided construction jobs and training to the local community. To minimize the environmental impact of the building, the architects used natural materials sourced locally, from red earth excavated on site to the tree trunks and bamboo cut from the surrounding forest. The guesthouse was also built to follow passive solar principles to keep naturally cool in Brazil’s tropical climate. Designed with flexible usage in mind, the nearly 37-square-meter Guesthouse Paraty can be used as short-term lodging, a workspace or a play space for children. The compact, single-story building includes three beds — the bedroom consists of a double bed and a lofted single bed, while a convertible futon sofa is located in the living area. The open-plan living space also includes a small cooking area and dining table. To keep the guesthouse from feeling cramped, the architects installed expansive walls of glass that usher in daylight and frame views of the outdoors; the glazed entrance on one end of the building also opens up to a sheltered outdoor living space. Because the project location is far from the town center, the architects wanted to use materials sourced from the site. As a result, the building was constructed with rammed earth walls and topped with a green roof finished with locally sourced black earth and plant matter. The formwork used for the rammed earth walls was recycled to build the roof structure. The columns supporting the weight of the roof were built from bamboo. Further tying the building in with the site is the inclusion of the existing massive granite rock that now forms part of the bedroom wall. Related: Bamboo community center empowers the local Brazilian community The overhanging roof eaves and the green roof mitigate unwanted solar heat gain. All windows are operable and strategically positioned to optimize cross-ventilation . Insect screens were installed to protect against mosquitoes. + CRU! architects Photography by Nelson Kon via CRU! architects

Original post: 
Eco-friendly guesthouse in Brazil sports a green roof and rammed earth walls

25 prefab eco-lodges pop up at ViVood’s adults-only Landscape Hotel in Spain

September 18, 2015 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on 25 prefab eco-lodges pop up at ViVood’s adults-only Landscape Hotel in Spain

Read the rest of 25 prefab eco-lodges pop up at ViVood’s adults-only Landscape Hotel in Spain

Here is the original post: 
25 prefab eco-lodges pop up at ViVood’s adults-only Landscape Hotel in Spain

CRG Architects’ unique bamboo skyscraper spirals up into the clouds

September 4, 2015 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on CRG Architects’ unique bamboo skyscraper spirals up into the clouds

Read the rest of CRG Architects’ unique bamboo skyscraper spirals up into the clouds

Read more: 
CRG Architects’ unique bamboo skyscraper spirals up into the clouds

Solar-powered LEED-certified home in Portland boasts a dazzling array of eco-friendly features

August 4, 2015 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Solar-powered LEED-certified home in Portland boasts a dazzling array of eco-friendly features

Read the rest of Solar-powered LEED-certified home in Portland boasts a dazzling array of eco-friendly features

Here is the original post: 
Solar-powered LEED-certified home in Portland boasts a dazzling array of eco-friendly features

Malaysian EcoSky development plans to collect rainwater, daylight, and compost its way to greener luxury living

July 7, 2015 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Malaysian EcoSky development plans to collect rainwater, daylight, and compost its way to greener luxury living

With the population booming and housing expansion taking place in all corners of the world, catching wind of a swanky new high-rise in a distant land can lead to some raised eyebrows. The EcoSky living center in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, however, is notable not for its excess, but for its attention to sustainable construction and maintenance practices. EcoWorld Development Sdn. Bhd. has released details about the project, which will be composed of three residential towers and a building named The Centre, referred to as “the green heart” of the construction. Read the rest of Malaysian EcoSky development plans to collect rainwater, daylight, and compost its way to greener luxury living Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: composting , Daylighting , eco friendly architecture , ecosky , kuala lampur , low concrete usage index , luxury apartments , Malaysia architecture , rainwater collection , Sustainable Building

Read the original here: 
Malaysian EcoSky development plans to collect rainwater, daylight, and compost its way to greener luxury living

WHIM Architecture’s Villa Al is a Green Living Complex In Tune With Nature

February 24, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on WHIM Architecture’s Villa Al is a Green Living Complex In Tune With Nature

Villa Al is WHIM Architecture ‘s design for a green villa in Almere, the Netherlands. The concept was created for an open design a competition, and is a reaction to the growing desire to build as environment friendly as possible. The villa is constructed from local and natural materials , but uses the latest technology available to fulfill its heating and electricity needs. To realize the home, the architects are seeking to collaborate with different experts to bring the project to fruition. + WHIM Architecture Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “dutch architecture” , “natural materials” , almere , eco friendly architecture , green architecture , local materials , the netherlands , Villa Al , WHIM Architecture

Continued here:
WHIM Architecture’s Villa Al is a Green Living Complex In Tune With Nature

Roots of Health Builds the First Mud House in Palawan, Philippines

August 12, 2011 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Roots of Health Builds the First Mud House in Palawan, Philippines

Read the rest of Roots of Health Builds the First Mud House in Palawan, Philippines Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Bamboo House , earth house , eco friendly architecture , green architecture , Green Building , green design , green materials , local materials , mud house , palawan , Philippines , roots of health , sustainable design

See the original post:
Roots of Health Builds the First Mud House in Palawan, Philippines

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1741 access attempts in the last 7 days.