An energy-efficient extension in Melbourne captures the owners adventurous spirits

July 20, 2018 by  
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A century-old Edwardian home has been updated with an airy and environmentally-friendly extension in Melbourne , Australia. Commissioned by clients who had recently returned to Melbourne to settle down after years of working and traveling overseas, the renovated dwelling — called the Glide House — was crafted by local architecture firm Ben Callery Architects to serve as a space that would embody the clients’ adventurous spirits. The extension’s butterfly roof adds sculptural flair to the new building, which was also integrated with energy-efficient features and local materials for low environmental impact. Working with a $350,000 AUD ($258,321 USD) budget, Ben Callery Architects emphasized flexibility in their redesign and expansion of the Glide House. The existing double-fronted Edwardian was left intact, however, the interior four rooms were reassigned to serve as flex rooms that could be easily adapted into bedrooms, living rooms or even workspaces . Currently, the original structure comprises the master bedroom, two bedrooms and the lounge. To minimize costs, the laundry, powder room and bathroom were placed in the new extension to avoid plumbing the old Edwardian. The living room, dining area and kitchen are also located in the extension . “Out the back, our clients wanted their own place in the sun,” Ben Callery Architects said. “They noted that in their travels they were often ‘chasing the sun.’ Upon returning home, they wanted a place they could settle in that encapsulated that spirit, but with the permanence of a home.” Related: A light-filled extension turns an Australian home into an oasis of calm As a result, the new extension is flooded with natural light yet is protected from unwanted solar gain in summer by the roof’s sweeping eaves. Clerestory windows let in cooling cross breezes and provide glimpses of the tree canopy. Recycled materials are used throughout the home, from the reclaimed timber in the cabinetry to the recycled brick pavers. Locally sourced materials were used wherever possible. Double-glazed windows and highly effective insulation also ensure energy efficiency. + Ben Callery Architects Images by Tatjana Plitt

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An energy-efficient extension in Melbourne captures the owners adventurous spirits

Rammed earth walls form the core of this modern Australian home

December 12, 2016 by  
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Innovative, eco-friendly materials and contemporary design form the basis for Willow Grove, a modern home in the Australian farming community of the same name. Finnis Architects designed the small three-bedroom house for a couple that sought a slower pace of life away from city living. Rammed earth walls made from locally sourced materials serve as the focal point of the design, which comprises two wings that spread out and overlook views of the countryside. The rammed earth walls , which can be seen at the entrance, cut through the home and create a connection between the interior and exterior. The warm-toned and textured look of rammed earth creates a sharp contrast with the dark polished concrete floors, and that dichotomy is enhanced by a minimalist materials and color palette. The facade is clad in corrugated metal sheeting as a reference to the rural area’s corrugated country sheds. Related: 8 inexpensive earth homes almost anyone can afford The wedge-shaped entry framed by the angled rammed earth walls open up to two wings on either side. The west wing houses the open-plan living area, dining room, and kitchen. The wing to the east contains two guest bedrooms, a bathroom, laundry room, and a master suite. Large windows frame hillside views and let in natural light , while large overhanging eaves mitigate solar heat gain and accentuate the roofline’s winged shape. + Finnis Architects Via ArchDaily Images via Finnis Architects , by Nic Granleese

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Rammed earth walls form the core of this modern Australian home

Timber "Eaves House" in Japan boasts an oversized mono-pitched roof

September 8, 2016 by  
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The presence of the mono-pitched roof made it possible for the architects to create a large waffle-shaped vertical space, leaving the rest of the interior free from partitioning. Large skylights provide a large amount of natural light , while the steep, oblique roof surface protects the residents from outside views. Related: Ant House hides an innovative wood interior behind a metal-clad cube in Japan Alternating open and closed spaces create a strong dynamic and are suitable for different uses throughout the year. Installed along the perimeter of the layout, glass surfaces visually connect the garden with the interior and blur the line between the inside and the outside. + mA-style architects Photos by Kai Nakamura

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Timber "Eaves House" in Japan boasts an oversized mono-pitched roof

Beautiful solar-powered soccer facility stays naturally cool in Australias heat

September 2, 2016 by  
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As with all k20 Architecture’s works on Inhabitat, sustainability is at the heart of BSRF. Solar panels power low-energy light fittings, while rainwater is collected and reused in the toilets. Extended eaves and double-glazing protect the building from harsh glare and natural ventilation is maximized with operable windows and thermal chimneys that provide stack effect cooling. Locally sourced and manufactured material components are used wherever possible, such as the carpets made of 40% recycled content and grandstand seating constructed of recycled plastic. Low VOC paints and durable finishes can be found throughout. BSRF’s most eye-catching element is the sculptural Eureka Stockade wall, the curved west-facing timber facade that protects the playing field from the winds and sun. The wall references the makeshift wooden barricade erected in the Battle of the Eureka Stockade fought between miners and the Colonial forces of Australia in 1854. The architect’s modern interpretation of the wall features a jagged roofline with a handsome mosaic of grey ironbark, spotted gum , and stringy bark. Related: Solar-powered civic center in Australia repurposes over 80% of its original building materials “The facility is unique in that it has been designed specifically for the soccer community of regional Victoria,” write the architects. “As a result, k20 Architecture was able to customize the design to emulate the experience of a world standard soccer stadium. This is illustrated in the alignment of the primary player’s race to the centre line of the playing pitch, which enables players of all ages and standards to experience key aspects of playing on the ‘big stage.’” The BSRF is part of the first stage for a still-developing master plan for the site. The facility was recently selected as a finalist in the 2016 Sport, Recreation and Play Industry Innovation, Facility Design and Development Awards and a finalist in the 2016 Australian Timber Design Awards Fitout Featuring Timber Cladding Category. + k20 Architecture Images via k20 Architecture

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Beautiful solar-powered soccer facility stays naturally cool in Australias heat

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