NASA researchers says Harvey flooding pushed Houston down two centimeters

September 11, 2017 by  
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Harvey unloaded around 33 trillion gallons of water in the United States, the weight of which is capable of bending the Earth’s crust . From satellite data , it looks like this is what happened in Houston . Scientist Chris Milliner of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory tweeted a map with GPS data revealing Houston has been pushed down by around two centimeters (or about 0.8 inches). Milliner’s map included Nevada Geodetic Laboratory data revealing the area around Houston was actually pushed down because of the weight of all the water from the tropical storm . One gallon of water weighs around 8.34 pounds, so if Harvey dumped 33 trillion gallons of water, that’s about 275 trillion pounds. Related: Arctic warming likely turned Harvey into “an extreme killer storm” GPS data show #Harveyflood was so large it flexed Earth's crust, pushing #Houston down by ~2 cm! #EarthScience #HurricaneHarvey #txflood pic.twitter.com/88lNScJBq9 — Chris Milliner (@Geo_GIF) September 4, 2017 It’s not the first time scientists have documented how the weight of water can alter the land. The Altantic cited a 2012 study focusing on the Himalayas that found a seasonal flux in the mountains’ height as water fell and then made its way down the mountains into Asian rivers. They also noted a 2017 study found “vertical surface displacement [with] peak-to-peak amplitudes” of 0.5 to one centimeter in the Sierra Nevada mountains. The Atlantic suggested the changes around Houston could be seen as a “fast-action version” of what takes place in mountain ranges during the seasons. The change could be due to soil beneath GPS stations compacting because of the weight of the water, Milliner said. But he thinks crust deformation was the main means of the change, since some of the GPS stations are on bedrock and also saw the depression. The ground has already been sinking in Houston, because we’ve pumped groundwater out of the city’s aquifers, according to The Atlantic. Milliner clarified the phenomenon he saw after Harvey is in addition to subsidence the city has experienced. Via The Atlantic Images via Chris Milliner on Twitter and U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Zachary Wolf

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NASA researchers says Harvey flooding pushed Houston down two centimeters

Ancient ocean crust in the Mediterranean Sea may predate supercontinent Pangea

August 17, 2016 by  
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A fascinating new geological study reveals a piece of oceanic crust in the Mediterranean Sea that could predate the supercontinent Pangea . Dated at around 340 million years old , the piece of oceanic crust found by geologist Roi Granot of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev is a promising contender for the oldest oceanic crust in the world.

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Ancient ocean crust in the Mediterranean Sea may predate supercontinent Pangea

Extreme Drought is Making the West Coast Rise Like an Uncoiled Spring

August 25, 2014 by  
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A new study published in Science by the Scripp’s Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego found that the earth’s crust is slowly rising in the West “like an uncoiled spring” due extreme drought. Scripps researchers found that the water shortage is causing an “uplift” effect of up to half and inch in California’s mountains, and 0.15 of an inch on average across the West. Read the rest of Extreme Drought is Making the West Coast Rise Like an Uncoiled Spring Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: California , Columbia University , Drought , duncan agnew , Earth Rising , earth uplift , earth’s crust , earthquake , earthquake potential , groundwater , institute of geophysics , klaus jacob , Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory , loss of groundwater , major fault lines , measuring water loss , national science foundation , plate boundary observatory , plate techtonics , science journal , scripp’s institution of oceonography , the west , UC San Diego , western US

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Extreme Drought is Making the West Coast Rise Like an Uncoiled Spring

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