Amazon deforestation threatens harpy eagles

July 1, 2021 by  
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A new study published in the journal  Scientific Reports has found that young harpy eagles are dying in the Amazon due to deforestation. The harpy eagle, one of the world’s largest eagles, has almost “zero” chances of surviving if Amazon deforestation continues. The study has established that harpy eagles are dying of starvation in areas where significant deforestation has occurred. The Amazon is the last remaining hope for the survival of harpy eagles, with almost 90% of the birds currently residing there. The study warns that the geographical range of the eagle is continuously being limited by continued deforestation. Related: Monarch butterfly population declines due to climate change and logging Professor Carlos Peres of the University of East Anglia, U.K. and co-author of the study said, “Considering that harpy eagles have the lowest life cycle of all bird species , their chances of adapting to highly deforested landscapes are nearly zero.” The adult harpy eagle females grow to 10 kilograms, making them one of the largest raptors in the world. They are native to the tropical forests of Central America to northern Argentina. Unfortunately, due to human interference and widespread deforestation, the eagles have disappeared from large parts of their native range. Currently, the biggest threat to the survival of the birds is deforestation . However, other factors, such as hunting, are also threatening their existence. In some countries, including Brazil, Panama and Suriname, the harpy eagle has legal protections. Unfortunately, enforcement of the laws in these regions has remained a big challenge. The study was led by Everton Miranda of the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. In their study, the researchers monitored 16 nests in the Brazilian Amazon using cameras. They found that eagles in the region mainly feast on two-toed sloths, brown capuchin monkeys and grey woolly monkeys. From bone fragments observed around nesting areas, the researchers established that the eagles could not find alternative food where there was deforestation. The most alarming observation was that in areas with 50% to 70% deforestation, at least three eagles died from starvation over the period of the study. In areas with deforestation over 70%, there were no nests to be found. Via BBC Image via cyrusbulsara

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Amazon deforestation threatens harpy eagles

Amazon deforestation threatens harpy eagles

July 1, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Amazon deforestation threatens harpy eagles

A new study published in the journal  Scientific Reports has found that young harpy eagles are dying in the Amazon due to deforestation. The harpy eagle, one of the world’s largest eagles, has almost “zero” chances of surviving if Amazon deforestation continues. The study has established that harpy eagles are dying of starvation in areas where significant deforestation has occurred. The Amazon is the last remaining hope for the survival of harpy eagles, with almost 90% of the birds currently residing there. The study warns that the geographical range of the eagle is continuously being limited by continued deforestation. Related: Monarch butterfly population declines due to climate change and logging Professor Carlos Peres of the University of East Anglia, U.K. and co-author of the study said, “Considering that harpy eagles have the lowest life cycle of all bird species , their chances of adapting to highly deforested landscapes are nearly zero.” The adult harpy eagle females grow to 10 kilograms, making them one of the largest raptors in the world. They are native to the tropical forests of Central America to northern Argentina. Unfortunately, due to human interference and widespread deforestation, the eagles have disappeared from large parts of their native range. Currently, the biggest threat to the survival of the birds is deforestation . However, other factors, such as hunting, are also threatening their existence. In some countries, including Brazil, Panama and Suriname, the harpy eagle has legal protections. Unfortunately, enforcement of the laws in these regions has remained a big challenge. The study was led by Everton Miranda of the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. In their study, the researchers monitored 16 nests in the Brazilian Amazon using cameras. They found that eagles in the region mainly feast on two-toed sloths, brown capuchin monkeys and grey woolly monkeys. From bone fragments observed around nesting areas, the researchers established that the eagles could not find alternative food where there was deforestation. The most alarming observation was that in areas with 50% to 70% deforestation, at least three eagles died from starvation over the period of the study. In areas with deforestation over 70%, there were no nests to be found. Via BBC Image via cyrusbulsara

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Amazon deforestation threatens harpy eagles

Fireworks banned due to heat in parts of western US

July 1, 2021 by  
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The U.S. has long prized personal rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of sparkly stuff to set on fire come the Fourth of July. But this year,  fire  chiefs in some cities across the West Coast are saying no to fireworks. Excessively hot and dry conditions plus amateur pyrotechnics equals a terrifying  wildfire  season for western states. Fireworks have started major wildfires in the past, including the 2017 Eagle Creek fire outside Portland, which was started by a 15-year-old boy and burned 50,000 acres. A 2020 gender reveal party in California started a wildfire that killed a firefighter. Related: Wildfires have burned 2.3M acres across California this year Portland , Oregon, broke heat records last Monday with a sizzling 116 degrees. In response, the Portland Fire Department has prohibited all fireworks until further notice. Fire departments in nearby Tualatin, Oregon, have banned fireworks through July 9. “If we don’t take this proactive step now, I fear the consequences could be devastating,” said Portland fire chief Sara Boone in a statement. “It is not easy to make a decision like this so close to our national  holiday , but as fire chief I feel I have a higher responsibility to sometimes make unpopular decisions during unprecedented times to protect life, property and the environment.” City officials in Yreka,  California , which is only thirty miles from the currently raging Lava Fire, have also banned fireworks until further notice. Some Utah, Washington and Montana towns have banned private fireworks this year. Steamboat Springs, Colorado, canceled its official public fireworks show. Clark County, in southwest Washington state, banned the sale and use of fireworks from June 29 through midnight on the Fourth of July. “We recognize that this decision will cause some hardship to some residents’ celebration plans as well as businesses and non-profit organizations that sell fireworks,” said Eileen Quiring O’Brien, the county council chair, according to KATU. “We empathize with all who are affected, but we must follow county codes. They are in place to protect the welfare and  safety  of Clark County residents.” Via The Guardian Lead image via Pixabay

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Fireworks banned due to heat in parts of western US

Michigan’s bald eagles are the most contaminated birds in the world

March 16, 2015 by  
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When you think of bald eagles, what comes to mind? More than likely it’s a vision of the majestic birds, soaring aloft, diving swiftly to catch a fish–not animals contaminated with toxic chemicals. It seems the latter is just the case in Michigan, where the state’s bald eagle population has the most contaminated birds on the planet , with abnormally high levels of flame-retardant chemicals in their livers. Read the rest of Michigan’s bald eagles are the most contaminated birds in the world Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bald eagles , contaminated , eagles , journal of great lakes research , Michigan , nil basu , pbdes , Pollution , polybrominated diphenyl ethers , university of michigan

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Michigan’s bald eagles are the most contaminated birds in the world

14 UGE Wind Turbines Turn Philadelphia Eagles’ Home Field Into the NFL’s Greenest Stadium!

November 12, 2012 by  
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Despite a challenging football season, the Philadelphia Eagles are clearly winning in the the alternative energy game. The team recently called upon New York-based Urban Green Energy (UGE) to install fourteen micro wind turbines  at Lincoln Financial Field. The turbines are located in two sets of seven at opposing ends of the field and connected to the stadium’s grid, reducing energy consumption during the day, and putting power back into the grid at night. Thanks to the stadium’s existing and future solar power arrays, the Eagles’ home field will now generate more alternative power than any stadium in the NFL . Read the rest of 14 UGE Wind Turbines Turn Philadelphia Eagles’ Home Field Into the NFL’s Greenest Stadium! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Energy Consumption , football , nfl , Philadelphia Eagles , renewable energy , solar panels , UGE , vertical axis , wind turbines

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14 UGE Wind Turbines Turn Philadelphia Eagles’ Home Field Into the NFL’s Greenest Stadium!

Pacific Tokelau Island Chain Becomes World’s First Solar-Powered Nation

November 12, 2012 by  
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Photo via Shutterstock The remote Pacific Island territory of Tokelau has officially become the world’s first solar-powered nation ! The population of 1,411 people decided to end their reliance on around 2,000 barrels of diesel each year, and instead install 4032 photovoltaic panels and 1344 batteries to produce 150 percent of the populations’ energy needs . While the vast majority of power will be provided by the solar systems, it will be supplemented by biofuels produced from locally-sourced—and plentiful— coconuts . Read the rest of Pacific Tokelau Island Chain Becomes World’s First Solar-Powered Nation Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 100% renewable energy , coconut biofuel , coconut fuel , coral atolls , Diesel Fuel , energy independence , first solar powered nation , New Zealand , pacific island , powersmart , Solar Power , Tokelau , tokelau renewable energy project , trep

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Pacific Tokelau Island Chain Becomes World’s First Solar-Powered Nation

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