Biomaterials Archive debuts at Dutch Design Week 2019

October 22, 2019 by  
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Dutch Design Week , the largest design event in Northern Europe, is back once again this October to show how pioneering designers around the globe are changing the world for the better. Spread out across nine days with over a hundred locations in Eindhoven, the annual event will host a wide array of exhibitions, lectures, festivities and more — including the first-ever public presentation of a Biomaterials Archive , where attendees can see, touch, smell and even taste innovative materials made by students from organic and recycled materials. Held this year from October 19 to 27, Dutch Design Week is an annual showcase of futuristic design that covers a wide breadth of topics from sustainable farming to artificial intelligence and robotics. Every year, more than 2,600 designers are invited to present their pioneering work — with a focus given to young and upcoming talent — and more than 350,000 visitors from the area and abroad flock to Eindhoven to see how design has the potential to improve the world. Creative proposals for reducing waste and addressing other timely environmental topics, such as climate and biodiversity crises, have also been increasingly highlighted in recent years.  One such example of forward-thinking design by young designers can be found at the Biomaterials Archive, a multi-sensory exhibit open to the public all week at Molenveld 42 | Downtown. Hosted by Ana Lisa, the tutor for Design Academy Eindhoven’s Make Material Sense class, the exhibition will feature #ZeroWaste and #ZeroBudget material samples created by second-year BA students. Visitors will have the opportunity to interact with proposed alternatives to materials such as leather, plastic, marble, cotton and MDF. Related: Colorful People’s Pavilion in Eindhoven is made from 100% borrowed materials “It unveils how these young designers are taking matter into their own hands by farming organisms on the Academy’s shelves or recycling what’s being trashed at home, school’s canteen, city or farms,” reads a statement on the DDW website, which references biomaterials made from old bread, lichen, acorn-MDF, coffee grounds, kombucha , cow manure and even vacuum dust. “While they close some loops and make new, shorter life-span materials that forge new paths into design and architecture.” + Biomaterials Archive Images via DDW

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Biomaterials Archive debuts at Dutch Design Week 2019

This Living Light is powered by a houseplant

November 17, 2017 by  
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Imagine a lamp that doesn’t need to be plugged in – and that you have to water once a week. Ermi van Oers is making it happen with this incredible plant-turned-lamp. The Living Light is an off-grid light that’s powered by a houseplant instead of an electrical socket. As organic compounds are released into the soil from photosynthesis, bacteria generates electrons and protons. These particles are tapped as an energy source to power the light. The healthier the plant is, the more photosynthesis takes place – and the more energy the system generates. It’s a pretty cool way to gauge how happy your plant lamp is. Related: Extraordinary living chandelier with algae-filled leaves purifies the air The Living Light produces up to 0.1mW of energy, which isn’t enough to light an entire room, but it’s plenty to act as your evening reading lamp. Van Oers and team aren’t done yet – they’re working on increasing the energy output, and they imagine that entire towns could be powered by forests one day. + Ermi van Oers Via Dezeen

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This Living Light is powered by a houseplant

This electricity-free LED lamp is powered by living bacteria

November 3, 2016 by  
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Dutch designer Teresa van Dongen has unveiled a fascinating LED pendant lamp that is powered by living, electrochemically-active bacteria. Called “Spark of Light,” this lamp builds on van Dongen’s previous work harnessing bioluminescent bacteria. The lamp is completely self-contained, and can operate without a plug or batteries. However, the organisms within do need to be fed to continue producing light. The spherical lamp is made of four separate compartments containing the bacteria . As long as they’re happy and healthy, these microorganisms constantly give off small electrical currents. An electrode within each section captures these currents and powers the LEDs in the center of the light. Van Dongen explained in an interview with Dezeen that as long as a teaspoon of acetate is added to the fluid within the lamp every two weeks, the light will continue to glow without any additional electricity, 24 hours a day. Every few months, the vessels within the lamp must be cleaned and refilled with tap water, salt, and vitamins. Related: The Electricity-Free Biobulb Uses Bacteria to Glow in the Dark The Spark of Life is just the latest zero-electricity lighting product van Dongen has developed. It should come as no surprise that she studied biology before deciding to pursue a design education in Eindhoven. With any luck, this innovative lamp will soon be available as a consumer product and not just a prototype. The pendant was showcased last month during 2016 Dutch Design Week. + Teresa van Dongen Via Dezeen

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This electricity-free LED lamp is powered by living bacteria

Beautiful fish-leather furniture made from salmon skins underscores plastic ocean waste

November 12, 2015 by  
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Beautiful fish-leather furniture made from salmon skins underscores plastic ocean waste

Amazing SUPERLOCAL hairdryer made of glass and cork

October 30, 2015 by  
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Amazing SUPERLOCAL hairdryer made of glass and cork

‘The Real Thing’ Machine Turns Coca-Cola Back Into Drinkable Water

November 4, 2014 by  
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These days it can seem like cola is absolutely everywhere, but drinkable water may not be. Helmut Smits wanted to take advantage of that contradiction with a machine he calls The Real Thing. The idea is to turn that unhealthy bottle of Coke back into clean, wholesome drinking water . The machine was featured at Dutch Design Week and Dezeen interviewed Smits to get the story behind the idea. Read the rest of ‘The Real Thing’ Machine Turns Coca-Cola Back Into Drinkable Water Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: clean water access , coca-cola into water machine , coca-cola water , cola into water , distilling water , drinkable water access , Dutch Design Week , helmut smits , machine turns cola into water , potable water , The Real Thing , The Real Thing Helmut Smits , water availability , water cola

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‘The Real Thing’ Machine Turns Coca-Cola Back Into Drinkable Water

Susana Soares’ Glass Device Uses Honey Bees to Detect Cancer

April 23, 2014 by  
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At last year’s Dutch Design Week in Eindhoven, Portuguese designer Susana Soares presented a device that can detect cancer and other diseases using honey bees . Known for their extraordinary sense of smell, bees can detect airborne molecules in the parts per trillion range and can be trained to recognize certain smells associated with diseases such as lung, skin and pancreatic cancer, as well as tuberculosis. Read the rest of Susana Soares’ Glass Device Uses Honey Bees to Detect Cancer Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bees cancer , bees diagnostics , bees diseases , bees medicine , Dutch Design Week , green design , honey bees training , pavlov’s reflex bees , portugese designers , Susana Soares bee’s , trained bees

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Susana Soares’ Glass Device Uses Honey Bees to Detect Cancer

Architect Liam Young Imagines a Sci-Fi Future City Under Tomorrow’s Sky

May 27, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Architect Liam Young Imagines a Sci-Fi Future City Under Tomorrow’s Sky Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: ana lisa alperovich , architectural fiction , Architecture , architecture future , City Palm Island , dubai , Dutch Design Week , Eindhoven , future city , Landscape Architecture , MU , post-capitalist , post-oil , Think Tank , Tomorrows Thoughts Today        

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Architect Liam Young Imagines a Sci-Fi Future City Under Tomorrow’s Sky

David Graas’ Colorful Modular Lamps Divert Plastic from Our Ocean’s ‘Soup’

May 13, 2013 by  
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Most plastics can be endlessly recycled without losing their indestructibility. But instead of being reused, the majority of plastics will end up as one-time-use products, finding their end as pollutants on land or in our oceans. Save Our Soup is Dutch designer David Graas’  colorful, speckled collection of recycled plastic lamps that have been created with then intent of diverting plastics from the Pacific Garbage Patch, or “soup”. Read the rest of David Graas’ Colorful Modular Lamps Divert Plastic from Our Ocean’s ‘Soup’ Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: ana lisa alperovich , ater Issues , David Graas , Dutch Design Week , green lighting , modular , recycled lamps , Recycled Materials , Recycled Plastic , Save Our Soup        

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David Graas’ Colorful Modular Lamps Divert Plastic from Our Ocean’s ‘Soup’

Just Desserts: Jay Watson Turns Unwanted Dessert Bowls Into Sweet Pendant Lights

May 13, 2013 by  
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‘ Just Desserts ’ is a colorful cluster of glass lights made from recycled dessert bowls. UK-based designer Jay Watson created this intriguing lighting array by stringing up traditional glass bowls sourced from flea markets and second-hand shops. The lamps are set to make their official debut at Interiors LDN  this May in London. Read the rest of Just Desserts: Jay Watson Turns Unwanted Dessert Bowls Into Sweet Pendant Lights Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Dessert Bowl Pendant Lamps , Discarded Dessert Bowls , Glass Lamps , Interiors LDN , Jay Watson , Just Desserts , LED , London , Recycled Dessert Bowls , recycled lamps , up-cycling        

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Just Desserts: Jay Watson Turns Unwanted Dessert Bowls Into Sweet Pendant Lights

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