Reused teak and earthy stone make up a luxury Goan home with canal views

November 24, 2020 by  
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In the village of Solid in North Goa, international architecture practice SAV Architecture + Design has completed the Earth House, a luxury home of 700 square meters that makes the most of its lush, tropical surroundings. Set next to a canal lined with coconut trees, the expansive home has allowed the outdoors to shape its design, from the massing that’s built to preserve existing mature trees to the natural materials palette. Internal courtyards, louvered semi-open spaces and an open-plan layout help achieve an indoor/outdoor living experience that makes the tropical landscape the focus. The Earth House’s site-specific massing comprises a series of long bays that open up to views of the canal that wraps around the north side of the site. Folding glass doors and large, glazed openings connect the indoors to the outdoor living areas, where sheltered patios with cane furnishings and a long pool extend the footprint of the home toward the canal. Upstairs, private terraces extend the bedrooms to the outdoors to continue the home’s constant connection with nature. Related: Luxury home in Kerala produces all of its own energy Inside, the home is centered on a white Fibonacci-style spiral staircase that serves as a sculptural focal point and connects to a spacious, double-height living room that overlooks the pool and canal. Teak wood is used throughout — from the custom-crafted entrance door to the wooden artwork wall in the living room — and imbues the home with a sense of warmth in contrast to the cool Goan-Portuguese concrete floors. “With large overhangs and exposed concrete roofs, the house is designed to brace the Goan tropical rains,” the architects said. “The inner courtyards around tall existing trees as the several louvred spaces keep the house passively cool and well-ventilated in the tropical hot climate. Most of the glazing is double-glazed and is oriented towards the north to allow minimal heat and direct sunlight into the house. The lines and forms of the Earth House are designed to connect constantly with its outdoors, bringing nature and all its coconut palm filled views in a modern, crafted and fluid manner.” + SAV Architecture + Design Photography by Fabien Charuau via SAV Architecture + Design

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Reused teak and earthy stone make up a luxury Goan home with canal views

Climate change is leading to increased winter drownings

November 24, 2020 by  
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A new study, published in the journal PLoS One , has revealed that there is a significant relationship between increased drownings in the winter and climate change. According to the study, regions that have experienced a sharp increase in average winter temperatures are also experiencing more drownings. The study, which was published last Wednesday, analyzed data collected in 10 countries in the Northern Hemisphere: U.S., Canada, Germany, Sweden, Japan, Italy, Russia, Finland, Latvia and Estonia. Many of the drownings that were studied happened when temperatures were just below freezing point. It was also observed that many increases in drownings occurred in Indigenous communities, where the people depend on the ice for their customs as well as for survival. Related: Danger looms as world’s largest iceberg heads toward a critical wildlife habitat The research showed that those affected by the drownings varied demographically. For instance, the most affected were children under 9 years old followed by teenagers and adults from ages 15 to 39. People who are accustomed to walking on icy landscapes may assume that the ice is stable enough without thinking about recent temperature fluctuations. One of the lead authors of the study, Sapna Sharma, explained that people may not think about how climate change is already impacting their everyday lives. Sharma, who is also an associate professor of biology at York University, said that we no longer have to just think about polar bears when we talk about climate change. The drownings are evidence enough that this crisis can affect anyone in any part of the world. “I think there’s a disconnect between climate change and the local, everyday impacts,” Sharma said. “If you think about climate change in winter, you’re thinking about polar bears and ice sheets, but not about these activities that are just ingrained in our culture.” According to Sharma, colder temperatures can be deceiving, especially at a time when the temperatures keep fluctuating. “It might be minus 20 Celsius today and tomorrow and the weekend, but last week it was 15 Celsius,” Sharma said. “Well, we might have forgotten as individuals that it was warm and sunny last week on a Tuesday, but the ice didn’t forget.” If the temperatures are milder than usual, the ice will not be as thick as one might expect. Robert McLeman, a professor of geography and environmental studies at Wilfrid Laurier, explained, “Milder temperatures mean that the ice is not as thick, or not as solid as it would otherwise be. And so people are going out onto it and not realizing that the ice is rotten.” + PLoS One Via The New York Times Image via Pixabay

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Climate change is leading to increased winter drownings

Fully circular office can be sustainably demounted and rebuilt in weeks

April 2, 2020 by  
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In its latest example of circular construction, Dutch architecture firm cepezed has completed Building D(emountable), a modern structure that can be fully demounted and is currently located in the heart of Delft. Designed as a building kit of prefabricated parts, the office raises the bar for sustainable architecture in the Netherlands, which aims to make all construction activities fully circular by 2050. Building D(emountable) was created as part of an office complex mostly housed in historic buildings on a centrally located site that cepezed purchased from Delft University of Technology in 2012. Over the years, the architecture firm repurposed the existing historic buildings into offices; however, it opted to demolish the site’s single non-historic structure due to its poor condition and to make way for new construction. Completed in late 2019, Building D(emountable) provides a modern counterpart to its historic neighbors. The building houses office space; the current tenants are app and website developer 9to5 Software and game developer Triumph Studios. Related: Amsterdam’s new circular archives building sustainably generates all of its own energy “Building D(emountable) has exactly the same footprint as the existing building that was no longer good and was demolished,” cepezed said of the four-story building, which encompasses nearly 1,000 square meters. “In addition to being demountable and remountable, the structure is also super lightweight: the use of materials is kept to an absolute minimum. The building is also completely flexible in its arrangement, has no gas connection and is equipped with heat recovery .” Apart from the concrete ground floor, all of the building components are modular and dry-mounted to allow for speedy construction, which takes a little over six months. The building structure — from the steel skeleton to the lightweight Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL) floors — was assembled onsite in just three weeks. Double-glazed panels were mounted directly onto the steel structure to create walls of glazing that give the building the appearance of a large, glass cube. + cepezed Photography by Lucas van der Wee via cepezed

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Fully circular office can be sustainably demounted and rebuilt in weeks

A dark, damp house becomes a sustainable, sun-soaked abode

November 9, 2018 by  
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Formerly cold, dim and damp, a terrace house in Northcote, Victoria has been reborn into a vibrant and welcoming dwelling with an emphasis on gardening. Designed by Green Sheep Collective for a client named Jill, the compact project, named Jill’s House, saw a modest expansion of just 22 square meters of space yet gained its bright and spacious feel thanks to a thorough renovation. Created to meet the client’s aspirations for a “very healthy home,” Jill’s House embraces recycled materials, low VOC finishes and passive solar principles for a minimal energy footprint. Having developed deep ties with her local community, the homeowner wanted the renovated house to be suitable for long-term living and retirement. As a result, the redesign prioritized accessibility, low maintenance and durability. Tapping into its extensive experience in eco-friendly retrofits, Green Sheep Collective opened the home to greater amounts of natural light while improving energy efficiency with the reorientation of the living areas to the north and the installation of high-performance materials, such as improved insulation and low-e double glazing. The open-plan living area also enjoys a seamless connection with the outdoors to support the client’s hobby of gardening. “The comfort, energy efficiency and longevity of the house have been improved immeasurably,” the designers noted. “Despite an existing north wall along the boundary, sunlight is brought deep into the house via a raked ceiling paired with electric-operated clerestory windows that soar above the kitchen and dining areas, doubling to encourage the ‘stack effect’ for ventilation and distinguish the extension from the original Victorian home.” Related: Smart Home targets affordability and eco-friendly design in Australia Adding to the overall sense of vibrancy, bright pops of color woven throughout were inspired by the client’s favorite Derwent pencils from childhood. A natural materials palette  — including plantation timber flooring and recycled red bricks — lend additional warmth and complement the restored furnishings that include the dining table, dining chairs and lounge suite. + Green Sheep Collective Photography by Emma Cross via Green Sheep Collective

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A dark, damp house becomes a sustainable, sun-soaked abode

A curved tunnel provides an unexpected connection in a renovated, mid-century home

October 24, 2018 by  
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When a well-traveled couple tapped Australian design practice Nic Owen Architects to renovate and expand their modest 1940s home in Hampton, the architecture firm channeled the clients’ love of adventure into a design that boasts elements of mystery and surprise. Connecting the original clicker brick structure to a new extension is a dark tunnel that’s curved to obscure views of either end and to create what the architects call a “surprising adventure,” giving rise to the project’s name, the Journey House. The project brief called for greater living spaces, updated amenities and a strong connection with the outdoors to complement a more tranquil and relaxing home environment. To respect the neighborhood’s character, the architects preserved the existing building and tucked the contemporary extension into the rear away from view of the street. Obscuring the extension creates a “voyage of discovery” for visitors who enter the mid-century home and then travel through the black timber-clad, curved tunnel that opens up to the surprisingly bright and airy destination: the new timber-framed extension housing the open-plan living spaces. Large,  double-glazed windows and sliding doors provide the close connection to nature that the homeowners wanted. “Filled with natural light, vaulted ceilings and the abundance of space, this new extension adds modern life to a tired mid-century classic,” the architects said in a project statement. “The project was a great opportunity to explore the idea of journey, the path one takes exploring the environment, to create an enticing, stimulating, workable space. I enjoyed challenging the perception of a typical family renovation/extension.” Related: A modular extension boasts a seamless indoor-outdoor living experience Updated to 166 square meters, the renovated and expanded house also boasts improved energy efficiency. In addition to the double-pane glass windows and doors oriented to the north to capitalize on solar gain, the architects installed custom CFC solar shades and used recycled materials and LED lighting throughout. + Nic Owen Architects Photography by  Christine Francis via Nic Owen Architects

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A curved tunnel provides an unexpected connection in a renovated, mid-century home

The Screen House comfortably and sustainably connects with the outdoors

October 23, 2018 by  
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When Camberwell-based design practice Warc Studio Architects was tapped to renovate and extend an existing Edwardian residence in Victoria, the Australian firm also wanted to open the house to greater connection with the outdoors. To mitigate the site’s potentially harsh western aspect and hot summers, the architects strategically constructed an externally operable screen that inspired the project’s name, the Screen House. Passive solar principles were also applied to keep the home comfortable year-round as were other sustainably minded design decisions, such as low-VOC finishes, formaldehyde-free plywood and the inclusion of a compost and vegetable garden. Completed in 2016, the Screen House began with the renovation of an existing detached weatherboard Edwardian residence. The architects upgraded the bathrooms and private areas while simultaneously improving internal circulation and making room for greater landscaping and a new swimming pool. To make the most of the newly added gardens and swimming pool, the firm designed an addition to house a new open-plan living room, kitchen and dining area overlooking the landscape. The main corridor that connects the extension to the existing house provides immediate views to the rear garden from the front entrance. “Windows, cabinetry, walls and ceilings were strategically placed to unveil views and openings to the outside,” the architecture firm explained. “As the the occupants proceed toward the rear, a series of views unfold: the North garden framed by cabinetry; glimpses of the sky through a strip skylight ; views of trees through high level windows; screened views to the western outdoor areas.” Related: An energy-efficient extension in Melbourne captures the owners’ adventurous spirits Timber hardwood screens envelop the rear additions to mitigate unwanted solar gain without compromising views and can be manipulated to maximize seasonal variation in passive solar radiation. To minimize energy needs and waste, the Screen House has also been equipped with high-performance insulation, double glazing, rainwater harvesting and hydronic heating underfoot. + Warc Studio Architects Images by Aaron Pocock

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The Screen House comfortably and sustainably connects with the outdoors

This ivy-covered writers studio camouflages into a leafy backyard

July 26, 2018 by  
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Here at Inhabitat, we love the trend of creative backyard studios , including the gorgeous Writer’s Shed that seamlessly blends into the verdant suburban surroundings of Melbourne. Designed by Australian practice Matt Gibson Architecture + Design in collaboration with landscape garden designer Ben Scott , the Writer’s Studio is a compact dwelling that uses a blanket of Boston Ivy for camouflage. Sustainability also played a large part in the energy-efficient design, which is based on passive solar principles and largely incorporated the use of renewable and sustainably sourced timber. Conceived as “a living part of the garden rather than an imposition on it,” the Writer’s Shed spans a modest 107 square feet. Despite its small footprint, the interior feels spacious thanks to a minimalist design and the abundance of glass that includes a large window, skylight and glazed door, all of which are fitted with double-glazed low-E glass and bathe the workspace in natural light. In contrast to its Boston Ivy-covered exterior that’s sealed with a rolled Butynol “wet-suit,” the light-filled interior is lined with Hoop Pine plywood panels (AFS- and FSC-Certified ). The engineered timber floor sits atop a concrete slab. Related: Elegant cork-clad artists’ studio slots into a bijou London garden “As the ways we work and live continue to adapt and change to our environment and technology, traditional notions are challenged and new opportunities appear,” the architects explained in their project statement. “An antidote is often needed to balance the overstimulating, populous and constantly-contactable workplaces where we spend much of our modern lives. More people are opting to work from a variety of locations, sometimes rejecting the rigid and sealed open plan office for the benefits of more natural surroundings. As a detached and flexible workspace, the Writer’s Shed provides an intimate private space to recoup, reflect and recharge the imagination.” + Matt Gibson Architecture + Design Images via Matt Gibson Architecture + Design

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This ivy-covered writers studio camouflages into a leafy backyard

Modern gabled guesthouse embraces passive solar in Australia

May 4, 2018 by  
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A sleek and modern take on the Australian farm building has popped up in the coastal town of Gerringong. Atelier Andy Carson designed Escarpment House as a two-bed guesthouse on an east-west axis to make the most of ocean views to the south and pastoral views to the north. The building orientation and material choice were also guided by passive solar principles. Set on nearly 150 acres of pasture with dairy cows, the Escarpment House maintains a relatively low profile with a simple gabled form created in the likeness of the traditional metal shed dairy structures of the region. “The project utilizes north and south decks as ‘winter’ and ‘summer’ outdoor space to enable the occupants to use the building mass as sun or wind protection moving to each side as favored,” wrote the architects. “The site positioning offered a significant view towards the nearby dairy with the setting sun over the escarpment offering a unique user experience.” The two bedrooms are located on the home’s east end, while the open-plan kitchen, dining area, and living space face the west. Related: Passive solar home stays naturally cool without AC in Australia Energy consumption is minimized through the regulation of light and views thanks to the west façade’s large operable panels that open or close with the touch of a button. Escarpment House also features extra-thick insulated walls and double-glazing . Supplementary solar power, rainwater harvesting with UV filtration and treatment, as well as on-site sewage treatment further reduce the home’s environmental impact. + Atelier Andy Carson Via ArchDaily Images © Michael Nicholson

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Modern gabled guesthouse embraces passive solar in Australia

Solar-powered home embraces sustainable design in Chihuahua

January 11, 2018 by  
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Sustainability and stunning views go hand-in-hand at the Cima House, a striking residence in Chihuahua , Mexico. Garza Iga Arquitectos designed the spacious solar-powered home rising three stories to overlook panoramic city views. Built with a concrete shell, the home’s appearance is softened by the layering of textiles and timber. The architects describe the 465-square-meter Cima House as a building “of opposites” from the way it was constructed to its current appearance. “Built with concrete, steel I beams, and wood; it resembles the classic architecture styles of Louis Kahn and Mies Van der Rohe but at the same time it incorporates a range of technological systems not available in their time,” wrote the architects. “Water collection, treatment and reuse, and solar power technology are only some of those mentioned systems.” Related: Zaha Hadid Architects breaks ground on Mexico’s City tallest residential tower In addition, the street-facing facade is dramatically different from the opposite end. For privacy and security, the architects constructed a windowless exterior to face the street, whereas the north-facing side is completely open to take in panoramic city views. The giant windows are double-glazed with argon gas sandwiched in between to protect from harsh solar gain. Thick concrete walls contain high thermal mass. The residence is also equipped with home automation that can be controlled remotely via smartphone. + Garza Iga Arquitectos Via ArchDaily Images via Garza Iga Arquitectos

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Affordable DublDom prefab home pops up in just one week

October 4, 2016 by  
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Completed for a budget of $42,500, this particular DublDom 2.65 model offers 65 square meters of space with enough room for two spacious bedrooms, a veranda, and common areas. Like all of BIO Architects’ modular homes , the EcoPark home was built mostly from wood for a cozy and welcoming feel. Large double-glazed windows let in natural light and frame panoramic views of the outdoors. “Our task was to organically enter the house in the natural surroundings, produce it in a short period time and cause minimum damage to the environment during the installation,” write the architects. “The architecture of the house is as much as possible open to the environment and interact with it. From the large living room you can see the endless fields and small river, two bedrooms behind the house are made for sleep. Layout of the house provides maximum exposure to the nature and to spend time with friends in the living room or on the veranda.” Related: Tiny and Affordable Russian DublDom Home Can Be Assembled in Just One Day The light-filled gabled home is minimally decorated with black metal and unpainted larch that line the exterior and parts of the interior. BIO Architects offers five different configurations of the DublDom 2.65; the Eco-Park client chose DublDom 2.65-01, which includes a spacious front veranda that wraps around the sides of the home and includes a small terrace in the rear; an open-plan kitchen, living, and dining area; a bathroom; and two equal-sized bedrooms. The house is elevated on stilts and was installed on site in seven days. + DublDom Images via DublDom , by Bokaeva Louise and Ivan Ovchinnikov

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Affordable DublDom prefab home pops up in just one week

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