Largest algae bloom in U.S. history is causing brain damage in California sea lions

December 15, 2015 by  
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Amid perhaps the largest toxic algae bloom in U.S. history , California’s sea lions are suffering brain damage , according to a new report. The algae produces domoic acid, which poisons the animals and leaves them unable to find food, leading to unprecedented numbers of stranded sea lions. Sick sea lions have been reported farther away than ever before and new reports further illuminate the link between the algae bloom and the loss of brain cells in sea lions. Read the rest of Largest algae bloom in U.S. history is causing brain damage in California sea lions

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Largest algae bloom in U.S. history is causing brain damage in California sea lions

Largest toxic algae bloom in West Coast history may be linked to climate change

June 17, 2015 by  
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The west coast is awash in the largest toxic algae bloom ever for the region, according to researchers at the University of California at Santa Cruz. The bloom first appeared in May and now stretches from California up the coast to Washington state. The algae produces a neurotoxin called domoic acid that is potentially fatal to humans. Its increasing span and severity is likely to keep people out of the water. Read the rest of Largest toxic algae bloom in West Coast history may be linked to climate change Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: California , domoic acid , Oregon , reasons not to eat fish , red tide , toxic algae bloom , toxic fish , toxic shellfish , u.s. west coast , washington , West Coast

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Largest toxic algae bloom in West Coast history may be linked to climate change

Researchers are introducing non-native insects in a desperate attempt to battle Japanese knotweed

June 17, 2015 by  
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If you live in the US or the UK, you are probably familiar with the scourge of Japanese knotweed, even if you don’t know it. Japanese knotweed is one of the world’s most invasive plants and has colonized many disturbed and undisturbed ecosystems in Massachusetts and at least 38 other states. It has no predators in North America or Europe and is notoriously difficult to remove by force. As the armies of knotweed march ever forward, scientists in the UK are experimenting with a dramatic method of weed-killing: the introduction of a non-native, knotweed-loving insect to munch the stalks down to size.   Read the rest of Researchers are introducing non-native insects in a desperate attempt to battle Japanese knotweed Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Aphalara itadori , beneficial insects , biological control , biological solutions , controlling japanese knotweed , ecosystem restoration , Fallopia japonica , Frederick Law Olmstead , green pest control , green weed control , invasive plants , invasive species , Japanese Knotweed , knotweed , New England invasives , non-native insects , non-native plants , pest control , psyllid , weed control , weeds

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Researchers are introducing non-native insects in a desperate attempt to battle Japanese knotweed

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