This off-grid school bus home has an incredible raised roof

July 17, 2017 by  
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Converting an old school bus into a livable home is no easy task, but with a little ingenuity, amazing spaces can be created. When Luke and Rachel Davis of Midwest Wanderers decided to travel full time with their daughter and dog, they renovated a 240-square-foot school bus into a surprisingly spacious off-grid home that includes a raised roof, solar panels, and a beautiful interior design. After deciding to leave their Chicago home behind and take the leap into nomadic living, the couple purchased an old school bus for $4,000. They gutted the entire structure and began to do the bus renovations themselves using as many repurposed materials as possible. A year and a half later, the couple raised the bus’s roof by 24 inches to add height to the living space. The extra space does wonders for the living area, which is illuminated with an abundance of natural light thanks to the porthole skylights on the raised ceiling. Related: Traveling family renovates old school bus as both solar-powered home and hostel The sophisticated interior design is extremely comfortable for the family of three, plus their dog, Baxter. The living room, kitchen, bathroom, and two bedrooms are all equipped with strategic storage solutions to help reduce clutter. Thanks to the elevated roof, the couple was able to add a sleeping loft on the upper level that is accessible via ladder. A second bedroom for their daughter is located just underneath on the main floor. The living area also has a sleeper sofa with plenty of storage underneath. Adjacent to the sofa is a dining table that can be folded down when not in use. A cast iron pot belly wood stove sits in the corner of the living space, and provides enough heat to warm the interior. In the corner of the living space is a compact bathroom, which was installed with a composting toilet and a RV-style tub shower. As a former baker, Rachel was determined to have a working kitchen with sufficient space. Accordingly, the kitchen was equipped with a large countertop, a four-burner stove, and a refrigerator. The handy duo wanted to make their new home as self-sufficient as possible. They used as many repurposed materials in the conversion process as possible, installing upcycled bamboo flooring, reclaimed barn beam countertops, a reclaimed barn wood accent wall, and a locally-reclaimed walnut table. For energy use, a 900-watt solar array provides all of the family’s energy and their water use is reduced thanks to a composting toilet and a low-flow shower head in the bathroom. You can follow the adventures of the Midwest Wanderers on their blog and Instagram page . + Midwest Wanderers Via Treehugger Photography via Midwest Wanderers

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This off-grid school bus home has an incredible raised roof

This farm in New York only grows food for donation (10 tons and counting)

July 17, 2017 by  
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Artist Dan Colen needed an escape from New York City. So he purchased Sky High Farm in New York’s Hudson Valley region in 2011, and worked with Berman Horn Studio to create a gorgeous haven with structures reminiscent of old farm buildings. Not only is the farm architecturally beautiful, it’s on a mission to do good. The 40-acre farm donates all of its organic produce – and eggs and meat from grass-fed animals – to food pantries and banks throughout the state. Sky High Farm is home to a striking Black Barn , designed by Berman Horn Studio. The L-shaped building has black wood siding – the color comes from Benjamin Moore’s Black – and a corrugated metal roof. Livestock reside in the barn, which also serves as a harvest processing center. Interns also dwell inside. Related: Beautiful modern barn produces food sustainably in Utah Berman Horn Studio said in their design statement that changes in materials in the interior speak of the changing functions of the space, while the black exterior lends a cohesiveness to the entire structure. Heavy timber construction is found in the livestock wing; light-filled interiors for the interns. The processing center has industrial finishes. Architect Maria Berman told Gardenista Colen “very much appreciates the integrity of vernacular working farm buildings, and wanted to create a building that felt like it could have been on this very old farm for many years.” The farm’s mission is food security ; the produce and meat products from the farm go to soup kitchens and food pantries or banks in New York City and other areas of the state to feed the hungry. Out of the 40 acres, 25 are used for animal pasture, and two are dedicated to vegetable production. The farm is currently in its fifth season and estimates they’ve been able to donate over 36,000 healthy, organic meals – emphasizing quality of food as much as quantity. On their website they put the donation of produce and meat in tons, saying they’ve donated more than 10 tons. + Sky High Farm + Berman Horn Studio Via Gardenista Images via Sky High Farm

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This farm in New York only grows food for donation (10 tons and counting)

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