PADI is making face masks from recycled ocean plastic

May 11, 2020 by  
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The Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) has teamed up with eco-friendly activewear company Rash’R to create a line of stylish face masks made using recycled plastic bottles from the ocean. The face masks are produced by Ocean Balance , a company that specializes in turning recovered ocean plastics and post-consumer plastic bottles into wearable fabric. The eco-friendly face masks are dual-layered with recycled polyester. They are reusable and include a filter pocket. The outer fabric is made with 100% recycled ocean waste polyester while the lining fabric is made of 92% recycled ocean waste polyester and 8% elastane. Each mask purchase includes five PM 2.5 carbon filters, but more can be ordered on the website. The face covering can be washed in the washing machine between uses. Related: How to make a mask with fabric to wear or donate Masks are being sold at cost, meaning the company is not making any profit from the sales. “The price you pay is our actual cost,” PADI said. “Our driving incentive and hope: that the PADI community will take precautions for their personal wellbeing, the wellbeing of the communities they call home and the ocean they dive.” Purchasing the face masks makes an impact on the serious issue of plastic pollution in our ocean while increasing the availability for the important medical-grade, surgical and N95 masks needed by first responders during the pandemic. The masks come in six different ocean life-inspired patterns for adults and one children’s size best suited for ages 4-10. According to the world-leading dive training organization, over 1,267 pounds of ocean plastic have been removed and reused based on the number of face masks customers have ordered so far. The masks have been selling out almost as quickly as the company is making them. Those interested in purchasing a mask can sign up for restock notification emails if the mask they want is out of stock. + PADI Images via PADI

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PADI is making face masks from recycled ocean plastic

Take a virtual dive with NOAA

April 22, 2020 by  
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NOAA has released a series of virtual dives to keep stay-at-homers entertained,  educated  and interested in the undersea world even when everybody’s stuck on the couch. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration takes viewers deep into national marine sanctuaries, revealing sights non- divers have likely never seen. The creators used 360-degree images to show off  corals , sea creatures and the undersea habitat. You can virtually visit these sanctuaries on your personal computer or smartphone. For more fun, pair your device with virtual reality goggles or a headset. Sanctuaries available for VR visits include American Samoa, the Florida Keys, Flower Garden Banks off Galveston, Texas, Gray’s Reef in Georgia, Monterey Bay, the Olympic Coast in Washington state, Stellwagen Bank in  Maine and Thunder Bay in Michigan. Each sanctuary offers a handful of dives to choose from featuring different types of sea life. A sea lion-focused dive was filmed in California’s Channel Islands. The virtual dives feature something for a wide variety of interests. You can get up close to a huge barrel sponge at Flower Gardens, or watch marine invertebrates called tunicates duke it out with orange cup corals in a turf war for the rocky substrate of  Washington’s Tatoosh Island. Those more intrigued by human drama can check out the remains of the  Paul Palmer,  a coal schooner built in 1902 that now lies atop Stellwagen Bank. Maybe it shouldn’t have started that final voyage on Friday the 13th, 1913. These 360-degree photos allow visitors to view spots within sanctuaries from every angle, almost as if you were turning your head to see what’s over yonder. Divers with special cameras take the underwater photos, which are then edited together.  NOAA plans to add to the gallery as divers take more shots. This collaboration between NOAA and the  Ocean Agency , a nonprofit ad agency that focuses on the sea, will open underwater doors for parents suddenly thrust into the role of home school teachers. + NOAA Images via Pexels

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Take a virtual dive with NOAA

ReGen Villages plans smart, circular communities in Sweden

April 22, 2020 by  
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Silicon Valley-based  ReGen Villages  has teamed up with Swedish architecture firm  White Arkitekter  to develop ReGen Villages Sweden, a vision for smart, self-sufficient communities throughout the Scandinavian country. Developed to meet the United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals, the proposal combines a wide variety of high- and low-tech environmentally friendly systems from organic gardens for local food production to the integration of artificial intelligence on a community-wide scale. The two firms hope to break ground on a ReGen Villages Sweden pilot project in 2020.  The ReGen Villages concept is based on five core principles: high-yield organic and ecological food production, mixed renewable energy and storage systems, water and waste recycling,  energy-positive  architecture and the empowerment of local communities. Each ReGen Village would measure approximately 250,000 square meters with only a quarter of the site occupied by buildings, including around 250 to 300 houses. The rest of the area will be used for farming and food production, energy production and water management.  Key to the design of ReGen Villages is the integration of Village OS, a ReGen Villages Holding-developed system based on AI technology and machine learning. Like the technology used in “ smart homes ,” Village OS will use computer systems to monitor all aspects of the community, from farming and recycling to residents’ energy and water usage. The local housing cooperative can use Village OS from a central hub to run the community’s daily operations, which will be optimized over time through collected data. Related: This train station which doubles as city hall in Sweden will function as an “urban living room” “Scalable, innovative solutions are the answers to the challenges of the future,” said James Ehrlich, founder of ReGen Villages Holding. “The collaboration with White will give  Sweden  and the Nordics the world’s first economically, ecologically and socially sustainable communities for ordinary people.” ReGen Villages has spent the past four years meeting with Swedish municipalities, landowners, property developers and stakeholders to push the project forward. White Arkitekter will handle the overall site planning and design of the community’s energy-positive architecture. + White Arkitekter Images via White Arkitekter

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ReGen Villages plans smart, circular communities in Sweden

Ingenious hand-pumped Scorkl lets you breathe underwater for 10 minutes

June 19, 2017 by  
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Scuba  diving may seem like too much of a hassle, what with all the equipment, training and money you need to make it happen. A new product – that’s like something straight out of a James Bond movie – called  Scorkl  opens up the underwater world by combining the best of scuba diving with the ease of snorkeling. A hand pump refills the underwater breathing device that’s roughly the size of a water bottle, giving you 10 minutes of uninhibited exploration. The Scorkl is a lightweight device you put to your mouth to breath in air while underwater – no scuba diving certification necessary. The Australia -based company says their cylinder is manufactured to the same standards and specifications as a cylinder you’d use to scuba dive, but it can be refilled with a Scorkl hand pump. The device also comes with a scuba tank refill adapter so it can be refilled from a scuba tank. A pressure gauge on the Scorkl lets users know how much air they have left – they’ll be able to swim freely through the water for around 10 minutes. Related: The Easybreath Snorkel Mask Lets You Breathe Comfortably Through Your Nose Underwater Scorkl is crowdfunding on Kickstarter , and it appears there are a bunch of people out there who are drawn to the freedom offered by the device – the company set their goal at $22,765 but have already raised over $370,000. One Scorkl costs $199 – that’s 33 percent off the retail price. A Scorkl and pump are being offered at a discount price of $398. At this point you’re probably wondering about safety . The company says the Scorkl is safe and can be used by anyone, but untrained divers should be cautious when swimming with it, and shouldn’t go below 9.8 feet in depth or use it more than five times in a single day. Trained divers should be able to go further than 9.8 feet drawing on what they learned during their certification process. The device is accompanied by an information kit warning users and offering tips to avoid pulmonary damage. The company says the Scorkl is designed for shallow diving , and they recommend not using it below 32 feet, even though it technically can go to depths of around 65 feet. You can check out the campaign here . + Scorkl Images via Scorkl Facebook

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Ingenious hand-pumped Scorkl lets you breathe underwater for 10 minutes

Future diving suits may be furry, thanks to the latest MIT research

January 20, 2016 by  
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When looking to perfect a manmade gadget sometimes the best solution is to think outside our own limited creativity and take notes from the most adaptable, problem-solving force out there: nature. Researchers at MIT have developed a way to make scuba diving warmer by studying the addition of small, silicone hairs to wetsuits . Captured by photographer Felice Frankel , the prototype may remind you of the hardy fur found on seals and sea lions – and that is precisely the point. Read the rest of Future diving suits may be furry, thanks to the latest MIT research

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Future diving suits may be furry, thanks to the latest MIT research

Australian farmer fights erosion with a patchwork of geometric designs

January 20, 2016 by  
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Is it art or is it smart conservation? Sometimes, the answer is both. One farmer in South Australia is fighting back against soil erosion using a patchwork of geometric designs plowed right into his fields. Brian Fischer, who farms 60 km (37 miles) north of Adelaide, came up with a creative and visually stunning way to protect his precious topsoil in the aftermath of recent brush fires . The result is a network of carefully planned swirls that create ridges in the topsoil, and Fischer says it’s working like a charm. Read the rest of Australian farmer fights erosion with a patchwork of geometric designs

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Australian farmer fights erosion with a patchwork of geometric designs

INFOGRAPHIC: How ocean pollution is harming your health

November 19, 2015 by  
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Did you know that 70% of the oxygen we breathe is produced by marine plants? While the deep blue sea may seem mysterious and even foreign, the oceans are fundamentally tied to our health and livelihoods. But pollution in those waters is threatening global health. Scuba Diving Magazine DIVE has created an infographic that explores the many ways oceans are important to humankind, the various causes of pollution, and how those problems can negatively affect us all. Read the rest of INFOGRAPHIC: How ocean pollution is harming your health

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INFOGRAPHIC: How ocean pollution is harming your health

Will Florida’s new artificial reef bring economic prosperity or ecological destruction?

December 26, 2014 by  
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Thanks to British Petroleum (BP) decimating the oceanic habitats in the Gulf of Mexico with the infamous Deepwater Horizon spill , their Gulf Tourism and Seafood Promotional Fund is now being forced to fork over $1.3 million in grants to Naples, Marco Island, and Collier County, Florida. Teamed with the Community Foundation of Collier County and the Economic Recovery Task Force, these three governments have chosen to spend this money by purchasing and installing “six 500-ton reefs the size of football fields, each with six smaller pyramid-shaped modules 8 to 12 feet high” 12-30 miles offshore. These reefs are meant to provide jobs and revenue, but will the economic prosperities outweigh the overall long-term environmental impacts? Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Read the rest of Will Florida’s new artificial reef bring economic prosperity or ecological destruction? Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: artificial reef , artificial reef in Florida , boat pollution , conservation , diving , ecological mess , ecology , economy , economy vs ecosystem , environment vs economy , Fishing , Florida reef , ocean diving , ocean predators , ocean reef , overfishing , Pollution , recycled reef , reef , water pollution

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Will Florida’s new artificial reef bring economic prosperity or ecological destruction?

Hannes Bend’s ‘Eclipse’ Installation Opens Eyes to the Artificial Reef Catastrophe

April 12, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Hannes Bend’s ‘Eclipse’ Installation Opens Eyes to the Artificial Reef Catastrophe Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: aquadome , art installation , artificial reef , Charest-Weinberg Gallery , coral , diving , eclipse , ecological disaster , florida , Fort Lauderdale , green design , hannes bend , marine conservation , natural reef , ocean conservation , onajide shabaka , osborne reef , public art , Reclaimed Materials , reclaimed tires , Recycled Materials , Sustainability , tires

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Hannes Bend’s ‘Eclipse’ Installation Opens Eyes to the Artificial Reef Catastrophe

U-Boat Worx introduces green submarines to go deep water

September 8, 2010 by  
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Eco Factor: New line of exploration submarines powered by lithium-ion battery.

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U-Boat Worx introduces green submarines to go deep water

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