FDA re-appropriates the term ‘milk,’ to potential benefit of dairy industry

July 20, 2018 by  
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In a potential blow to almond and soy milk producers, the FDA plans to crack down on the usage of the term “milk” to refer to nondairy products. Current federal standards regarding the term’s usage were changed in April 2017 in an attempt to boost sales of dairy products, but the standards have not been strictly enforced. Now, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb is saying that “plant-based dairy imitators” popular among vegetarians and health-conscious individuals violate the organization’s official definition of milk: “the lacteal secretion, practically free from colostrum obtained by the complete milking of one or more healthy cows.” According to the Gottlieb, “an almond doesn’t lactate.” The FDA has moved forward with the change despite the fact that several lawsuits are expected. Those protesting the distinction argue that various dictionary definitions cite milk as coming from both nuts and animals , with the earliest records that contain the name ‘almond milk’ dating back to the 16th century. The Food and Drug Administration has argued that it is protecting consumers who may be misled into buying the alternatives while in search of a dairy product. Related: Unreleased internal FDA emails show glyphosate weedkiller residue in almost every food tested Dairy manufacturers have been losing business to their counterparts in the nut industry, which might explain why they’re happy about the change. The worth of the dairy-alternative industry is projected to grow to over $34 billion in the next five years, while dairy producers have been facing falling prices and global oversupply. Chris Galen, a spokesperson for the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF), expressed the group’s support for the FDA’s tightening of the reins on “dairy imitators (who) violate long standing federal standards.” While the FDA will have to take public comment and develop guidelines before it enacts the change, it seems that big dairy may already have gotten what it wanted. Via Treehugger Images via Shutterstock

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FDA re-appropriates the term ‘milk,’ to potential benefit of dairy industry

Lush green roof of native plants breathes life into a Texan cabana

February 28, 2018 by  
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This minimalist concrete-and-glass cabana looks as if it rose straight from the ground thanks to its beautiful green roof that ties it into verdant surroundings in Palmer, Texas. Dallas-based architecture firm Wernerfield designed the PTX1 Cabana, a simple and transparent structure that provides a strong contrast to the wild and colorful plants like yucca and sage that grow atop its roof. The rectangular pool house also doubles as a “remote” entertaining space with an indoor lounge, bathroom and exercise room. Built with clean lines and a restrained palette, the 1,372-square-foot PTX1 Cabana was designed with simple elegance in mind so as not to detract from the views of the main house that sits uphill. Full-height glazing wraps around the pool house to give it a sense of lightness while a concrete roof with deep overhangs protect against solar gain . White stucco was used for the exterior surfaces. Related: Spectacular wildflower roof grows atop a dreamy Texan cabana Retractable glass walls further minimize the distinction between indoors and out. A rectangular pool deck with lounge chairs and a fire pit separates the cabana from a lap pool fitted with colored lights. + Wernerfield Via Dezeen Photos by Robert Yu

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Lush green roof of native plants breathes life into a Texan cabana

This adorable little sea slug is solar powered

August 7, 2015 by  
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Costasiella kuroshimae , known commonly as Leaf Sheep, is an ocean-dwelling grazer that “steals”  photosynthesizing chloroplasts from the food it eats in order to generate energy. The Leaf Sheep is a species of sea slug that munches on algae instead of grass, like the sheep you find on dry land. Reaching a length of 5 mm, the tiny aquatic slug has the distinction of being one of the few animals that are able to photosynthesize. Read the rest of This adorable little sea slug is solar powered

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This adorable little sea slug is solar powered

Q&A: Andrea Fabbri, COO of EcoAlign, Focuses on Smart Grid

June 18, 2010 by  
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Earlier this month EcoAlign , a strategic marketing agency primarily focused on energy and the environment (where I am a senior adviser), published a new report “Separating Smart Grid from Smart Meters? Consumer Perceptions and Expectations of Smart Grid. ” It is the eighth EcoPinion report, the latest in a series of a bimonthly, proprietary research reports on assessments of consumer values, drivers and behavior around energy and environmental needs

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Q&A: Andrea Fabbri, COO of EcoAlign, Focuses on Smart Grid

Flexible Silicon Solar Cells Use 99% Less Material

February 16, 2010 by  
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Researchers have found a way to make flexible silicon solar cells using only 1 percent of the material used in conventional solar cells. The cells are made of micron-sized silicon wires that are encased in a flexible polymer that can be rolled or bent.  The researchers at Cal Tech who developed the cells eventually see them being used in clothing, but, for now, the cells could create cheaper and easier-to-install solar panels.

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Flexible Silicon Solar Cells Use 99% Less Material

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