We could avoid 3.3 million cases of dengue fever each year if we limit global warming

May 29, 2018 by  
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Climate change: it’s not just about rising oceans. According to new research from the  University of East Anglia (UEA), action on climate change could help avoid millions of cases of dengue fever . If we limited global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius — a Paris Agreement target — we might be able to avoid around 3.3 million cases annually of the tropical disease  in the Caribbean and Latin America alone. There are around 54 million cases of dengue fever, caused by a mosquito -spread virus, in the Caribbean and Latin America every year, and approximately 390 million people are infected worldwide. But by around 2050, in a 3.7 degrees Celsius warming scenario, this number could increase by 7.5 million additional cases a year. While dengue fever is only fatal in rare cases, a specific treatment does not exist, and symptoms include headaches, muscle and joint pain, and fever. Related: Climate change could reverse all reductions in child mortality over the last 25 years But if we take action against global warming , we might be able to prevent millions of cases, according to UEA’s research, which drew on computer models and clinical and laboratory-confirmed reports of dengue fever in Latin America. Keeping warming to two degrees Celsius could lower cases by as many as 2.8 million per year by 2100, and keeping warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius could see an extra drop of half a million cases a year. Lead researcher Felipe Colón-González of UEA said, “While it is recognized that limiting warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius would have benefits for human health , the magnitude of these benefits remains mostly unquantified. This is the first study to show that reductions in warming from two degrees Celsius to 1.5 degrees Celsius could have important health benefits.” Co-author Carlos Peres of UEA said, “Our economic projections of the regional health costs of climate change show that developing nations will bear the brunt of expanding arbovirus infections, so a preventative strategy in reducing greenhouse gas emissions sooner rather than later is the most cost-effective policy.” The journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences published the research this week; researchers from Universidade do Estado de Mato Grosso in Brazil contributed. + University of East Anglia Image via Depositphotos

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We could avoid 3.3 million cases of dengue fever each year if we limit global warming

Massive Ancient Mushroom Could Hold the Cure for Many Diseases

October 21, 2014 by  
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The agarikon is one of the largest, oldest-living mushrooms in the world, and at least one scientist believes it holds the key for a cure to tuberculosis – along with many other illnesses. Paul Stamets, founder of Fungi Perfecti and an advisor at the Program of Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona Medical School has been hunting for the elusive and endangered agarikon in the old growth forests of the Pacific Northwest – one of only a few places in the world along with Europe where these massive fungi grow. Why, you ask? Both in ancient spiritual traditions and modern medicine, agarikon are believed to be one of the most potent medicines known to humanity. Indigenous peoples in both North America and Europe used agarikon to treat a host of illnesses and infectious diseases – ranging from coughs to asthma, and arthritis to infections. Even the ancient Greeks knew of agarikon and called it an “elixir for long life” because it was used to treat tuberculosis. Read the rest of Massive Ancient Mushroom Could Hold the Cure for Many Diseases Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: agarikon , arthristis , bird flu , disease , fungi , fungus , mushroom , old growth forest , stamets , swine ful , treatment , tuberculosis

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Massive Ancient Mushroom Could Hold the Cure for Many Diseases

The Week in Animal News: Melting Zombie Caterpillars, Self-Cloning Jellyfish, and More (Slideshow)

September 30, 2011 by  
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Image: TreeHugger Scientists have made some startling discoveries in the animal world this week — from a virus that causes caterpillars to turn into melting zombies to a lonely jellyfish that has produced hundreds of clones of itself. We also have birds thought to be extinct making a comeback, red squirrels disappearing in England, a fish making its own tool to help it eat, and more in the Week in Animal News.

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The Week in Animal News: Melting Zombie Caterpillars, Self-Cloning Jellyfish, and More (Slideshow)

The Week in Pictures: Living Map of Central Park, a Bike with Metal Tires, and More (Slideshow)

September 30, 2011 by  
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Image: TreeHugger We’ve featured a lot of vertical gardens on TreeHugger, many of them superb but none quite like this one, grown as a living map of New York’s Central Park. We also have a bike with innovative metal wheels, avant-garde DIY fall harvest decor, a play ground that looks like a deep sea monster, watermelon and tomato gazpacho ice cream, and more in our roundup of the best images on TreeHugger this week. … Read the full story on TreeHugger

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The Week in Pictures: Living Map of Central Park, a Bike with Metal Tires, and More (Slideshow)

Over Half of Child Car Seats Contains Toxic Chemicals

August 3, 2011 by  
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Photo: Healthy Stuff /Press photos Healthy Stuff has released their test results for 2011 on child car seats. The organization has been testing car safety seats since 2008. The bad news in 2011: over half of child car seats still have elements detected suggesting the use of chemicals with known or suspected deleterious health effects. The good news: since Healthy Stuff started testing child seats in 2008, the average rankings have improved by 64%. … Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Over Half of Child Car Seats Contains Toxic Chemicals

Europe Proposes Seven New Chemical Substances of Very High Concern

February 27, 2011 by  
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Image: ECHA Guidance This week Europe proposed to add seven more chemicals to the list of substances of very high concern (SVHC). The addition of a chemical to the SVHC list enables European regulators to ban the chemical from the market unless it is proven that the risks are adequately controlled, or there is not a feasible substitute and the socio-economic benefits justify the risk. The pr..

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Europe Proposes Seven New Chemical Substances of Very High Concern

Life Cycle Cost of Coal Power in the U.S. – $500 Billion/Year

February 17, 2011 by  
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A new Harvard University study examines the life cycle cost of coal power including all the resulting environmental and health expenses and found that although the coal itself might be cheap, the price of generating power from it is not.  The study found that coal power actually costs the U.S. somewhere between $345 billion and $500 billion each year. The study says that if all of those expenses were included in people’s electricity bills, it would double to triple the cost of coal power, adding $0.09 – $0.27 per kWh, making it no longer the cheapest source of electricity, but one of the most expensive

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Life Cycle Cost of Coal Power in the U.S. – $500 Billion/Year

80% Of All US’ Antibiotics Given To Farm Animals

December 28, 2010 by  
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photo: CALM Action / Creative Commons Even for someone who follows sustainable agriculture and animal welfare issues, this is pretty astounding: New analysis by the Center for a Livable Future shows that 80% of all antibiotics sold in the United States go to farm animals (

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80% Of All US’ Antibiotics Given To Farm Animals

Using Coke Distribution Networks to Get Medicine to Rural Villages

December 22, 2010 by  
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Image: Screenshot via ColaLife ColaLife has a simple but smart idea: use the distribution networks already established for Coca Cola drinks, which are available in the most remote parts of the world, to get “social products” like oral rehydration salts to these same areas. Coke is available in the areas, but the simplest of medicines usually aren’t, and rural populations have devastatingly high mortality rates from very treatable things like diarrhea.

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Using Coke Distribution Networks to Get Medicine to Rural Villages

What is the Role of ICT in Sustainable Development?

December 6, 2010 by  
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In 2000, at the United Nations’ Millennium Summit a set of development goals were created with an aim to improve some of the most critical social, economic, and environmental issues in the developing world by 2015.

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What is the Role of ICT in Sustainable Development?

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