ESG in 2021: The State of Play

February 25, 2021 by  
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ESG in 2021: The State of Play Date/Time: March 18, 2021 (1-2PM ET / 10-11AM PT) The world of environmental, social and governance metrics and ratings has entered a new and dynamic phase. Suddenly, nearly every publicly held company — and many privately held firms — are examining their policies and programs through the lens of investors’ rising interest in ESG metrics. For their part, investors are learning that corporate environmental and social activities are no longer a nice-to-do activity — they are core to well-managed and profitable companies. As a result, ESG has moved from the margins to the mainstream. What are the implications for today’s sustainability and finance professionals? How can they serve the interests of investor relations departments, risk professionals and other internal stakeholders who have become part of the ESG ecosystem inside companies?  In this one-hour webcast, you’ll hear the state of play from two industry insiders. Among the things you’ll learn: What are the key ESG metrics investors are examining? What are the opportunities for sustainability professionals to play a leadership role in their company’s ESG strategy? How will the Biden administration affect the trajectory of ESG transparency and disclosure? What are the rising ESG issues that investors are considering in assessing companies? Moderator: Joel Makower, Chairman & Executive Editor, GreenBiz Speakers: Thomas Kamei, Executive Director, Investment Management, Morgan Stanley Tessie Petion, Head, ESG Engagement, Amazon If you can’t tune in live, please register and we will email you a link to access the archived webcast footage and resources, available to you on-demand after the webcast. taylor flores Thu, 02/25/2021 – 11:53 Joel Makower Chairman & Executive Editor GreenBiz Group @makower Thomas Kamei Executive Director, Investment Management Morgan Stanley Tessie Petion Head, ESG Engagement Amazon gbz_webcast_date Thu, 03/18/2021 – 10:00 – Thu, 03/18/2021 – 11:00

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ESG in 2021: The State of Play

Amazon aims to clean up aviation

January 27, 2021 by  
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Amazon aims to clean up aviation Katie Fehrenbacher Wed, 01/27/2021 – 02:00 The aviation sector in a pandemic has 99 problems. And climate change remains a big one.  The industry aims to build back better, aware that it’s one of the few sectors that hasn’t yet embraced electrification. The key solutions today are biofuels, only displacing a mere fraction of fossil fuels-based jet fuel, and offsets. But in reality, with revenues and ticket sales way down, there’s only so much commercial airlines actually will do to meet decarbonization goals. And if you look at the aviation industry’s historical pledges to add in bio-based jet fuels, before the pandemic, it’s fallen woefully short. Enter air cargo. More specifically, Amazon’s air shipping business, which along with its entire global logistics supply chain juggernaut is booming.  A startup called Infinium announced it has raised a round of funding including backing from Amazon’s Climate Pledge Fund. Infinium makes biofuel by taking hydrogen made with clean power and electrolysis, combining it with carbon dioxide and running it through two thermochemical processes — turning it into a replacement fuel for airplanes, ships and large trucks. Infinium, spun out of another company called Greyrock Energy , says because the biofuel (dubbed an “electrofuel”) is made with clean energy and CO2, it’s a “net-zero carbon” fuel. The fuel isn’t yet being made commercially just yet, and it’ll take at least three years to build a factory and start making it at any kind of scale. Economic production at scale is the key metric for biofuel makers.  Still, Amazon’s support is the latest indicator that the logistics giant is eyeing ways to clean up aviation. Amazon Vice President of Worldwide Sustainability Kara Hurst released a statement about the investment: Amazon created The Climate Pledge Fund to support the development of technologies and services that will enable Amazon and other companies to reach the goals of the Paris Agreement 10 years early — achieving net-zero carbon by 2040. Infinium’s electrofuels solution has real potential to help decarbonize transport that carries heavier loads and travels long distances, including air and freight, as well as heavy trucks. This isn’t Amazon’s first investment in biofuels. Last summer Amazon announced that it plans to buy 6 million gallons of bio-jet fuel via a division of Shell and produced by World Energy, a big biodiesel producer. The companies said the jet fuel will be made from agricultural waste fats and oils (such as used cooking oil and inedible fats from beef processing). The world of bio-jet fuel is just getting started. Shell is emerging as a player, but so is Neste, a Finnish company that also makes a renewable diesel product for trucking. Last year, Neste delivered its first batch of sustainable aviation fuel via pipeline for airlines refueling at San Francisco International Airport to use. DHL Express is using Neste’s sustainable aviation fuel at SFO.  Amazon is worried about the carbon intensity of the fossil fuel-based jet fuel it uses because it’s trying to get to zero carbon by 2040. Air shipping, a growing sector, is the most carbon-intensive way to ship a product. As Amazon Air Director Raoul Sreenivasan said at our VERGE 20 online conference in October: “The world is watching what we do. And we believe we have a responsibility to use our scale for good and make the appropriate investments to achieve this goal.” Because bio-jet fuel is at such an early stage, Amazon can’t just go out and switch over its entire air fleet to the stuff. But there are a couple of things Amazon can do as the industry is still maturing. Amazon is already electrifying the ground air equipment at its airport facilities. It’s also putting solar up on buildings at the airports. Most important, Amazon can use its heft to help move the sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) industry forward. As Sreenivasan said about SAF at VERGE 20: “Our hope is that by making an investment and a commitment that others will partner with us and cause somewhat of a ripple effect in the industry that will drive demand and supply.” Essentially, if Amazon’s moving in, hopefully the rest of aviation will follow. With more supply deals and investments in new players, we’ll see if the logistics world leader can green up one of the hardest-to-abate sectors: aviation.  Want more great analysis of electric and sustainable transport? Sign up for Transport Weekly , our free email newsletter. Topics Transportation & Mobility Supply Chain Aviation Logisitics Featured Column Driving Change Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off

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Researchers discover new species of endangered blue whale

January 7, 2021 by  
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Researchers have discovered a new blue whale species, according to a paper recently published in  Endangered Species Research . The researchers behind the paper recorded a novel blue whale song and verified it in the western Indian Ocean. The song was heard from the Arabian Sea coast to the Chagos Archipelago in the central Indian Ocean and even as far as Madagascar.  Blue Whales are the largest mammals ever known on the face of the Earth. While available in all oceans (except the Arctic ), various unique species show up in different regions. Each species of blue whale is identified by its unique song.  Lead researcher and co-author of the study Dr. Salvatore Cerchio first recorded the sound in 2017 while researching Omura’s whales. Dr. Cerichio, who is also the Director of the African Aquatic Conservation Fund’s cetacean program, has been  leading research  into the new species since then.  “It was quite remarkable,” said Cerchio, “to find a whale song in your data that was completely unique, never before reported, and recognize it as a blue whale.” Given that researchers have extensively studied whale sounds, this finding was a big deal in scientific circles. “With all that work on blue whale songs, to think there was a population out there that no one knew about until 2017, well, it kind of blows your mind,” Cerchio added. The findings lead some researchers to raise concerns about the possibility of additional undiscovered blue whale species. According to Andrew Willson from Five Oceans Environmental Services LLC, who was part of the research team, blue whales and Arabian Sea Humpback whales may comprise several unique subspecies.   “These populations appear to be unique among baleen whales, in the case of the Arabian Sea humpback whales because of their year-round residency in the region without the same long-range migration of other populations,” Willson said. The finding now opens doors for researchers to determine the status of the unique species.  Meanwhile, Suaad Al Harthi, Executive Director of the Environment Society of Oman , touches on the balance between looking into this new species while also saving the endangered Arabian Sea Humpback. “For 20 years we have focused work on the highly endangered Arabian Sea humpback whale, for which we believe only about 100 animals remain off the coast of Oman. Now, we are just beginning to learn more about another equally special, and likely equally endangered, population of a blue whale,” said Al Harthi. + NEAQ Images via NEAQ

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Episode 248: Mastercard CSO, parsing plastics policy, Paris Agreement at 5

December 11, 2020 by  
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Episode 248: Mastercard CSO, parsing plastics policy, Paris Agreement at 5 Heather Clancy Fri, 12/11/2020 – 00:10 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (5:30). HSBC invests in world’s first “reef credit” system Does 2020 mark a turning point for delivering on the Paris Agreement goals? How do you avoid getting distracted and stay focused on the mission? Features What will Biden mean for the circular economy? (18:20)   Don’t expect the incoming administration to use that nomenclature, but plastics pollution and recycling are far more likely to get national attention. Associate Editor Deonna Anderson chats with GreenBiz’s senior analyst for circular economy issues, Lauren Phipps. How Mastercard is helping spenders restore trees (26:45)   Big brands are leaning into growing consumer interest in supporting products and services that do “better” for the planet. Kristina Kloberdanz, senior vice president and chief sustainability officer of Mastercard, discusses the recent expansion of the Priceless Planet Coalition — which aspires to restore 100 million trees.  Happy 5th anniversary, Paris Agreement (39:25)   Maria Mendiluce, CEO of the We Mean Business Coalition, chats about signs of progress, the power of alliances and how companies can improve disclosure without engaging in greenwashing.  Climate change and healthcare (53:45)   What’s the emissions profile of the powerful healthcare sector? Can we create a circular supply chain for supplies? How should training evolve? Alan Weil, editor-in-chief of Health Affairs, visits with perspective from the journal’s recent report on these issues.  *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “Curiosity,” “Keeping Stuff Together,” “Southside,” “Night Caves” “New Day,” “Sad Marimba Planet” and “As I Was Saying” *This episode was sponsored by Salesforce and WestRock Do we have a newsletter for you! We produce six weekly newsletters: GreenBuzz by Executive Editor Joel Makower (Monday); Transport Weekly by Senior Writer and Analyst Katie Fehrenbacher (Tuesday); VERGE Weekly by Executive Director Shana Rappaport and Editorial Director Heather Clancy (Wednesday); Energy Weekly by Senior Energy Analyst Sarah Golden (Thursday); Food Weekly by Carbon and Food Analyst Jim Giles (Thursday); and Circular Weekly by Director and Senior Analyst Lauren Phipps (Friday). You must subscribe to each newsletter in order to receive it. Please visit this page to choose which you want to receive. The GreenBiz Intelligence Panel is the survey body we poll regularly throughout the year on key trends and developments in sustainability. To become part of the panel, click here . Enrolling is free and should take two minutes. Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Deonna Anderson Lauren Phipps Topics Podcast Policy & Politics Finance & Investing Consumer Products Paris Agreement Health & Well-being Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 1:06:56 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 248: Mastercard CSO, parsing plastics policy, Paris Agreement at 5

Adidas and H&M join project to scale circular fashion and recycled fibers

December 11, 2020 by  
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Adidas and H&M join project to scale circular fashion and recycled fibers Michael Holder Fri, 12/11/2020 – 00:05 Adidas and H&M Group are among a host of fashion and textile firms to have teamed up for an EU-funded sustainable fashion project announced in late November, which aims to develop a circular economy for clothing that would result in old garments and fibers being recycled into new items for major high street brands. Over three years, the New Cotton Project will see textile waste collected and sorted via consumer apparel take-back programs, then regenerated into cellulose-based textile fibers by Finnish biotechnology specialist Infinited Fiber Company, the 12 project partners confirmed. The resulting fiber will be used to create different types of fabrics for clothing that are designed, manufactured and sold by global sportswear brand Adidas and retail companies in the H&M Group, they explained. The “world first” project is being led by Infinited Fiber Company, alongside a consortium of 11 other companies and organizations spanning the entire supply chain, including manufacturers Inovafil, Tekstina and Kipas, which will use old garments to produce yarns, woven fabrics and denim, respectively. The New Cotton Project was a direct response to major and growing environmental problems in the textile industry relating to the production of raw materials such as cotton, viscose and fossil-based fibers such as polyester. Textile recycling specialist Frankenhuis, meanwhile, has been tasked with sorting and pre-processing the textile waste, and South-Eastern Finland University of Applied Sciences (Xamk) aims to develop a technical solution for the continuous processing of textile waste fibers for pre-treatment, they said. In addition, Revolve Waste has been appointed to collect and manage data on textile waste to estimate feedstock availability across Europe, while RISE — Sweden’s state-owned research institute — has been brought on board to conduct sustainability analyses and manage eco-labelling for garments created through the project. Finally, sustainable fashion platform Fashion for Good has been tasked with leading stakeholder co-operation and communications efforts, with branding support from Finland’s Aalto University and Infinited Fiber Company. Petri Alava, co-founder and CEO of Infinited Fiber Company, said the New Cotton Project was a direct response to major and growing environmental problems in the textile industry relating to the production of raw materials such as cotton, viscose and fossil-based fibers such as polyester. By developing a system to replace some need for virgin fiber and materials, he said the project was “breaking new ground when it comes to making circularity in the textile industry a reality.” “The enthusiasm and commitment with which the entire consortium has come together to work towards a cleaner, more sustainable future for fashion is truly inspiring,” he added. Pull Quote The New Cotton Project was a direct response to major and growing environmental problems in the textile industry relating to the production of raw materials such as cotton, viscose and fossil-based fibers such as polyester. Topics Circular Economy Supply Chain Fashion Textile Waste European Union BusinessGreen Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Photo by  MikeDotta  on Shutterstock.

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Adidas and H&M join project to scale circular fashion and recycled fibers

Episode 247: Biden wish lists, supporting ‘intersectional environmentalists’

December 4, 2020 by  
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Episode 247: Biden wish lists, supporting ‘intersectional environmentalists’ Heather Clancy Fri, 12/04/2020 – 02:00 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (7:35). In the quest for carbon offsets, (almost) anything goes Recycled plastic: There’s market demand, but where’s the supply? Features What Joe Biden could do to cultivate carbon removal innovation (16:35)   Nonprofit Carbon180 has plenty of ideas for how the Department of Energy and the Department of Agriculture can collaborate to cultivate new economic opportunities centered on carbon removal. Co-founder and managing director Giana Amador suggests top priorities. How financial policy could charge up clean energy  (29:00)   Without Congressional control, President-elect Joe Biden will find it tough to pass ambitious climate action, but he can do much by aligning financial policies to address risks associated with climate-fueling activities. GreenBiz Senior Energy Analyst Sarah Golden offers details.  Biodiversity in fashion (37:35)   Liesel Truscott, director of nonprofit Textile Exchange, and Helen Crowley, a Kering sourcing executive serving as an advisor at Conversational International, discuss a new tool to help the fashion and textile industry understand and measure impacts and dependencies on nature in materials sourcing — and make changes to better support biodiversity.  Inclusive environmentalism (47:37)   Intersectional Environmentalist, an organization seeking to amplify underrepresented, diverse voices in the environmental movement, is teaming with tea company TAZO on a new internship program. Co-founder Sabs Katz addresses why this issue deserves more attention from companies. Read the whole interview. *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “Curiosity,” “Knowing the Truth,” “And So Then,” “Thinking It Over,” “I’m Going for a Coffee,” “Introducing the Pre-roll” and “Here’s the Thing *This episode was sponsored by Salesforce and Shell Resources galore Say ‘hy-drogen’ to a decarbonized future. Our latest energy transition webcast at 1 p.m. EST Dec. 8 explores the potential for green hydrogen technologies, with experts from Shell, the U.S. Department of Energy and the Green Hydrogen Coalition. Sign up here . Recycling’s makeover, courtesy of AI and robotics. New technologies are solving logistics logjams and making it simpler to sort more materials. Join the discussion at 1 p.m. EST Dec. 10.  Do we have a newsletter for you! We produce six weekly newsletters: GreenBuzz by Executive Editor Joel Makower (Monday); Transport Weekly by Senior Writer and Analyst Katie Fehrenbacher (Tuesday); VERGE Weekly by Executive Director Shana Rappaport and Editorial Director Heather Clancy (Wednesday); Energy Weekly by Senior Energy Analyst Sarah Golden (Thursday); Food Weekly by Carbon and Food Analyst Jim Giles (Thursday); and Circular Weekly by Director and Senior Analyst Lauren Phipps (Friday). You must subscribe to each newsletter in order to receive it. Please visit this page to choose which you want to receive. The GreenBiz Intelligence Panel is the survey body we poll regularly throughout the year on key trends and developments in sustainability. To become part of the panel, click here . Enrolling is free and should take two minutes. Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Deonna Anderson Sarah Golden Topics Podcast Carbon Removal Carbon Policy Renewable Energy Policy & Politics Racial Issues Environmental Justice Fashion Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 54:53 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 247: Biden wish lists, supporting ‘intersectional environmentalists’

How 117-year-old Ford plans to curb carbon emissions by 2050

December 1, 2020 by  
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Effective action on climate change takes cooperation on all levels. From governments to the private sector to individuals, everyone must do their part to solve this collective problem, together. In the U.S., the biggest source of carbon emissions by sector is transportation, producing 28% of all greenhouse gas emissions in 2018, according to the EPA . As such, any pathway to reduced greenhouse gases and a comprehensive response to climate change must involve stakeholders from the transportation sector — thankfully America’s best-selling automotive brand is stepping up. As a major global and domestic player in the auto industry, Ford has the potential to make a major impact — and the company is aiming high. By 2050, Ford aims to achieve global carbon neutrality. How can one of America’s best-selling automakers in one of the most carbon-producing sectors go completely carbon neutral in less than 30 years? Ford developed an ambitious but actionable plan, starting with support at the top of the company and extending to every employee and vendor across its global supply chain. “We were committed to setting aspirational goals to start moving the needle, to start having a positive impact,” says Director of Global Sustainability for Ford, Mary A. Wroten . “It’s like setting a New Year’s resolution. If you don’t have a goal, you’ll never steer yourself toward whatever that resolution is.” Though the 117-year-old company released its first sustainability report in 1999, Wroten suggests that founder Henry Ford laid down the roots for sustainability before the idea as we know it existed. A self-described environmentalist, he was famous for eliminating waste at Ford manufacturing facilities. “ He used the wood from shipping crates for the floor pans of early vehicles,” explains Wroten. “Any wood that was leftover was turned into briquettes for barbecuing, and he eventually started a charcoal company called Kingsford Charcoal.” Setting targets and sticking to them, no matter what Even today, sustainability at Ford starts at the top. “These aspirational goals are a way to harness all the executives within the organization to tackle these issues, get buy-in and drive change throughout the company,” says Wroten. After the goals are set, executives then go to work developing metrics and tools to hit targets, according to Wroten. Meanwhile, the company is ensuring every employee gets sustainability integration training. At Ford, sustainability is key to every aspect of the business. Understanding that sustainability is part of their role helps ensure employee buy-in, according to Wroten. The company’s long-term goals reflect a committed approach. When the Trump Administration announced the end of U.S. participation in the Paris Climate Agreement in 2017 and then announced a rollback of auto emissions standards in 2020, Ford didn’t waver on its sustainability targets — as of June 23 of this year, Ford is the only U.S. automaker committed to doing its part to reduce CO? emissions in line with the Paris Climate Agreement and working with California for stronger vehicle greenhouse gas standards. “All of our decisions build upon each other,” Wroten says, noting that the Paris Climate Accords call for carbon neutrality by the second half of the century. “We continue to believe that this path is what’s best for our customers, our environment and both the short and long-term health of the auto industry,” she says. So what’s inside the plan moving forward? Ford, along with third-party consultants, advisors and auditors, determined that three areas make up 95% of its carbon emissions : vehicle use, supply base and company facilities. First up, let’s look at how Ford is changing the way we drive. The electrification of Ford vehicles Over the next year, Ford is rolling out two new fully electric vehicles in the US, the Mustang Mach-E and the E-Transit electric work van. And while the launch of new electric vehicles is exciting, it’s the launch of North America’s largest charging network that Ford hopes will truly shift the paradigm of driving to electric. “We can’t just release great products,” says Wroten, “we also need to provide a great charging experience so our customers don’t worry about range anxiety and other concerns consumers have about electric vehicles.” The FordPass ™ Charging Network — the largest public charging network in North America* — will feature more than 13,500 charging stations with more than 40,000 charging plugs. However, simply switching to electricity doesn’t necessarily make for the greatest reductions of carbon emissions — that electricity must also come from a renewable source. Ford is taking a well-to-wheel approach, meaning that the company is working to ensure that the electricity originates from renewable sources . “The energy that’s used to propel our vehicles is very much part of our plan to reduce carbon emissions,” adds Wroten, noting that a green grid is essential to hitting carbon targets. It’s an initiative the brand is spearheading in its own facilities. Manufacturing for today and the future Within its own manufacturing facilities, Ford is working closely with local collaborators to ensure that they are running on 100% renewable , locally sourced energy by 2035. This will account for 80% of the carbon output of Ford facilities says Wroten. The company is releasing a plan for the remaining 20% of carbon emissions in the next year. Meanwhile, beyond carbon, Ford is making its facilities even more sustainable. Over the next 10 years, Ford is eliminating single-use plastics from all operations , with a long term goal of achieving zero landfill waste across the company. Longer-term aspirational goals include zero water withdrawals for manufacturing and zero air emissions. Based on third-party audits, the data suggests Ford is well on its way to meeting carbon targets. In 2019, all Ford facilities across the globe combined produced as much carbon as one coal-fired power plant . Building a more sustainable supply base Cutting emissions from Ford facilities and vehicles isn’t enough, and the brand knows it. Ford works with a complex network of suppliers across the globe, which Wroten suggests accounts for some 15% to 17% of the company’s carbon emissions . For its domestic efforts to matter, their partners need to pull their weight, too. To reach carbon neutrality across the board, Ford is sharing its learnings and tools with certain suppliers in hopes of replicating sustainable practices. And over the next five years, Ford estimates saving over 680,000 metric tons of carbon — the equivalent of consuming about 1.57 million barrels of oil — thanks to the supply base approach. The automaker’s desire to extend its carbon-neutral strategy to suppliers underscores a larger issue around climate change and any environmental initiative: collaboration is essential for success. “We know we can’t do this alone,” says Wroten, “reaching carbon neutrality is a team sport.” From innovative electric vehicles to a widening green grid to bringing all stakeholders in on the mission, the approach Ford is taking is nothing short of comprehensive. * Based on original equipment manufacturers(OEM)/automotive manufacturers that sell all-electric vehicles and have publicly announced charging networks. Department of Energy data used. FordPass, compatible with select smartphone platforms, is available via a download. Message and data rates may apply. + Ford Images via Ford

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3Degree’s Dave Meyer on the future of the Low Carbon Fuel Standard in America

November 20, 2020 by  
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3Degree’s Dave Meyer on the future of the Low Carbon Fuel Standard in America This video is sponsored by 3Degrees. “Transportation is the single largest contributor to GHG emissions in California, so if we are going to meet the targets generally that California has set, addressing these emissions from transportation is going to have to be a big part of that.”   Katie Fehrenbacher, Senior Analyst, Transportation, Greenbiz, interviewed Dave Meyer, Director, LCFS Programs, 3Degrees, during VERGE 20, which took place 10/26-10/30/20. View archived videos from the conference here: https://www.greenbiz.com/topics/verge-20-archive . YanniGuo Fri, 11/20/2020 – 11:24 Featured Off

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3Degree’s Dave Meyer on the future of the Low Carbon Fuel Standard in America

How AI and Robotics are Transforming Recycling

November 18, 2020 by  
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How AI and Robotics are Transforming Recycling Date/Time: December 10, 2020 (1-2PM ET / 10-11AM PT) The challenges facing recycling in the U.S. may seem daunting but cross-sector collaboration is providing a path forward on many of its toughest issues. This kind of collaboration – CPG companies working hand-in-hand with technological innovators, MRF operators and investors – will be critical to solving logjams and current hurdles to improving recycling in the United States. Leaders from AMP Robotics, GFL Environmental, Keurig Dr Pepper and Sidewalk Infrastructures sit down to discuss how their work together is bringing about much needed change to our recycling systems and how this collaborative systems approach proves the power of cross-sector action to address critical issues. Moderator: John Davies, Vice President & Senior Analyst, GreenBiz Speakers: Monique Oxender, Chief Sustainability Officer, Keurig Dr Pepper Rob Writz, Director, Business Development, AMP Robotics Michael DeLucia, Principal, Sidewalk Infrastructure Brent Hildebrand, Vice President, Recycling U.S. Operations, GFL Environmental If you can’t tune in live, please register and we will email you a link to access the archived webcast footage and resources, available to you on-demand after the webcast. taylor flores Wed, 11/18/2020 – 13:39 John Davies VP, Senior Analyst GreenBiz Group @greenbizjd Monique Oxender Chief Sustainability Officer Keurig Dr Pepper Rob Writz Director, Business Development AMP Robotics @rdubv3 Michael DeLucia Principal Sidewalk Infrastructure Partners Brent Hildebrand Vice President, Recycling U.S. Operations GFL Environmental gbz_webcast_date Thu, 12/10/2020 – 10:00 – Thu, 12/10/2020 – 11:00

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How AI and Robotics are Transforming Recycling

Episode 245: How President-elect Joe Biden could help U.S. farmers

November 13, 2020 by  
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Episode 245: How President-elect Joe Biden could help U.S. farmers Heather Clancy Fri, 11/13/2020 – 02:00 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (6:25). Linking S with E in the renewable energy sector How tenants continue to press for greener commercial buildings, despite COVID-19 7 ways to bridge the blue finance gap to protect the oceans Features How companies can engage authentically with communities (18:20)   Highlights from our VERGE 20 mainstage conversation with environmental justice leaders Rahwa Ghirmatzion, executive director of People United for Sustainable Housing (PUSH), and Elizabeth Yeampierre, executive director of UPROSE. There’s no one formula, but it starts with being transparent and willing to listen. How President-elect Joe Biden could support regenerative agriculture, Black farmers (24:45)   What would those focused on sustainable food systems like the incoming administration to prioritize? For a start, the U.S. Department of Agriculture could use existing funding and programs to encourage soil health. Plus, let’s see better support for the Black farming community. GreenBiz Food Analyst Jim Giles weighs in with suggestions.   *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “Curiosity,” “I’m Going for a Coffee,” “Here’s the Thing,” “Waiting for the Moment That Never Comes” and “Knowing the Truth” *This episode was sponsored by Shell Resources galore Behavior change and the circular economy. How innovation and new business models alter people’s relationship with waste. Join the discussion at 8 p.m. EST Nov. 12.  Missing pieces of decarbonization. Join us for a discussion on how 100 percent renewable power can practically, affordably and quickly become a reality. Register for this webcast at 1 p.m. EST Nov. 19. Do we have a newsletter for you! We produce six weekly newsletters: GreenBuzz by Executive Editor Joel Makower (Monday); Transport Weekly by Senior Writer and Analyst Katie Fehrenbacher (Tuesday); VERGE Weekly by Executive Director Shana Rappaport and Editorial Director Heather Clancy (Wednesday); Energy Weekly by Senior Energy Analyst Sarah Golden (Thursday); Food Weekly by Carbon and Food Analyst Jim Giles (Thursday); and Circular Weekly by Director and Senior Analyst Lauren Phipps (Friday). You must subscribe to each newsletter in order to receive it. Please visit this page to choose which you want to receive. The GreenBiz Intelligence Panel is the survey body we poll regularly throughout the year on key trends and developments in sustainability. To become part of the panel, click here . Enrolling is free and should take two minutes. Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Jim Giles Topics Podcast Policy & Politics VERGE 20 Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 35:11 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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