How 117-year-old Ford plans to curb carbon emissions by 2050

December 1, 2020 by  
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Effective action on climate change takes cooperation on all levels. From governments to the private sector to individuals, everyone must do their part to solve this collective problem, together. In the U.S., the biggest source of carbon emissions by sector is transportation, producing 28% of all greenhouse gas emissions in 2018, according to the EPA . As such, any pathway to reduced greenhouse gases and a comprehensive response to climate change must involve stakeholders from the transportation sector — thankfully America’s best-selling automotive brand is stepping up. As a major global and domestic player in the auto industry, Ford has the potential to make a major impact — and the company is aiming high. By 2050, Ford aims to achieve global carbon neutrality. How can one of America’s best-selling automakers in one of the most carbon-producing sectors go completely carbon neutral in less than 30 years? Ford developed an ambitious but actionable plan, starting with support at the top of the company and extending to every employee and vendor across its global supply chain. “We were committed to setting aspirational goals to start moving the needle, to start having a positive impact,” says Director of Global Sustainability for Ford, Mary A. Wroten . “It’s like setting a New Year’s resolution. If you don’t have a goal, you’ll never steer yourself toward whatever that resolution is.” Though the 117-year-old company released its first sustainability report in 1999, Wroten suggests that founder Henry Ford laid down the roots for sustainability before the idea as we know it existed. A self-described environmentalist, he was famous for eliminating waste at Ford manufacturing facilities. “ He used the wood from shipping crates for the floor pans of early vehicles,” explains Wroten. “Any wood that was leftover was turned into briquettes for barbecuing, and he eventually started a charcoal company called Kingsford Charcoal.” Setting targets and sticking to them, no matter what Even today, sustainability at Ford starts at the top. “These aspirational goals are a way to harness all the executives within the organization to tackle these issues, get buy-in and drive change throughout the company,” says Wroten. After the goals are set, executives then go to work developing metrics and tools to hit targets, according to Wroten. Meanwhile, the company is ensuring every employee gets sustainability integration training. At Ford, sustainability is key to every aspect of the business. Understanding that sustainability is part of their role helps ensure employee buy-in, according to Wroten. The company’s long-term goals reflect a committed approach. When the Trump Administration announced the end of U.S. participation in the Paris Climate Agreement in 2017 and then announced a rollback of auto emissions standards in 2020, Ford didn’t waver on its sustainability targets — as of June 23 of this year, Ford is the only U.S. automaker committed to doing its part to reduce CO? emissions in line with the Paris Climate Agreement and working with California for stronger vehicle greenhouse gas standards. “All of our decisions build upon each other,” Wroten says, noting that the Paris Climate Accords call for carbon neutrality by the second half of the century. “We continue to believe that this path is what’s best for our customers, our environment and both the short and long-term health of the auto industry,” she says. So what’s inside the plan moving forward? Ford, along with third-party consultants, advisors and auditors, determined that three areas make up 95% of its carbon emissions : vehicle use, supply base and company facilities. First up, let’s look at how Ford is changing the way we drive. The electrification of Ford vehicles Over the next year, Ford is rolling out two new fully electric vehicles in the US, the Mustang Mach-E and the E-Transit electric work van. And while the launch of new electric vehicles is exciting, it’s the launch of North America’s largest charging network that Ford hopes will truly shift the paradigm of driving to electric. “We can’t just release great products,” says Wroten, “we also need to provide a great charging experience so our customers don’t worry about range anxiety and other concerns consumers have about electric vehicles.” The FordPass ™ Charging Network — the largest public charging network in North America* — will feature more than 13,500 charging stations with more than 40,000 charging plugs. However, simply switching to electricity doesn’t necessarily make for the greatest reductions of carbon emissions — that electricity must also come from a renewable source. Ford is taking a well-to-wheel approach, meaning that the company is working to ensure that the electricity originates from renewable sources . “The energy that’s used to propel our vehicles is very much part of our plan to reduce carbon emissions,” adds Wroten, noting that a green grid is essential to hitting carbon targets. It’s an initiative the brand is spearheading in its own facilities. Manufacturing for today and the future Within its own manufacturing facilities, Ford is working closely with local collaborators to ensure that they are running on 100% renewable , locally sourced energy by 2035. This will account for 80% of the carbon output of Ford facilities says Wroten. The company is releasing a plan for the remaining 20% of carbon emissions in the next year. Meanwhile, beyond carbon, Ford is making its facilities even more sustainable. Over the next 10 years, Ford is eliminating single-use plastics from all operations , with a long term goal of achieving zero landfill waste across the company. Longer-term aspirational goals include zero water withdrawals for manufacturing and zero air emissions. Based on third-party audits, the data suggests Ford is well on its way to meeting carbon targets. In 2019, all Ford facilities across the globe combined produced as much carbon as one coal-fired power plant . Building a more sustainable supply base Cutting emissions from Ford facilities and vehicles isn’t enough, and the brand knows it. Ford works with a complex network of suppliers across the globe, which Wroten suggests accounts for some 15% to 17% of the company’s carbon emissions . For its domestic efforts to matter, their partners need to pull their weight, too. To reach carbon neutrality across the board, Ford is sharing its learnings and tools with certain suppliers in hopes of replicating sustainable practices. And over the next five years, Ford estimates saving over 680,000 metric tons of carbon — the equivalent of consuming about 1.57 million barrels of oil — thanks to the supply base approach. The automaker’s desire to extend its carbon-neutral strategy to suppliers underscores a larger issue around climate change and any environmental initiative: collaboration is essential for success. “We know we can’t do this alone,” says Wroten, “reaching carbon neutrality is a team sport.” From innovative electric vehicles to a widening green grid to bringing all stakeholders in on the mission, the approach Ford is taking is nothing short of comprehensive. * Based on original equipment manufacturers(OEM)/automotive manufacturers that sell all-electric vehicles and have publicly announced charging networks. Department of Energy data used. FordPass, compatible with select smartphone platforms, is available via a download. Message and data rates may apply. + Ford Images via Ford

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How 117-year-old Ford plans to curb carbon emissions by 2050

3Degree’s Dave Meyer on the future of the Low Carbon Fuel Standard in America

November 20, 2020 by  
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3Degree’s Dave Meyer on the future of the Low Carbon Fuel Standard in America This video is sponsored by 3Degrees. “Transportation is the single largest contributor to GHG emissions in California, so if we are going to meet the targets generally that California has set, addressing these emissions from transportation is going to have to be a big part of that.”   Katie Fehrenbacher, Senior Analyst, Transportation, Greenbiz, interviewed Dave Meyer, Director, LCFS Programs, 3Degrees, during VERGE 20, which took place 10/26-10/30/20. View archived videos from the conference here: https://www.greenbiz.com/topics/verge-20-archive . YanniGuo Fri, 11/20/2020 – 11:24 Featured Off

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3Degree’s Dave Meyer on the future of the Low Carbon Fuel Standard in America

How AI and Robotics are Transforming Recycling

November 18, 2020 by  
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How AI and Robotics are Transforming Recycling Date/Time: December 10, 2020 (1-2PM ET / 10-11AM PT) The challenges facing recycling in the U.S. may seem daunting but cross-sector collaboration is providing a path forward on many of its toughest issues. This kind of collaboration – CPG companies working hand-in-hand with technological innovators, MRF operators and investors – will be critical to solving logjams and current hurdles to improving recycling in the United States. Leaders from AMP Robotics, GFL Environmental, Keurig Dr Pepper and Sidewalk Infrastructures sit down to discuss how their work together is bringing about much needed change to our recycling systems and how this collaborative systems approach proves the power of cross-sector action to address critical issues. Moderator: John Davies, Vice President & Senior Analyst, GreenBiz Speakers: Monique Oxender, Chief Sustainability Officer, Keurig Dr Pepper Rob Writz, Director, Business Development, AMP Robotics Michael DeLucia, Principal, Sidewalk Infrastructure Brent Hildebrand, Vice President, Recycling U.S. Operations, GFL Environmental If you can’t tune in live, please register and we will email you a link to access the archived webcast footage and resources, available to you on-demand after the webcast. taylor flores Wed, 11/18/2020 – 13:39 John Davies VP, Senior Analyst GreenBiz Group @greenbizjd Monique Oxender Chief Sustainability Officer Keurig Dr Pepper Rob Writz Director, Business Development AMP Robotics @rdubv3 Michael DeLucia Principal Sidewalk Infrastructure Partners Brent Hildebrand Vice President, Recycling U.S. Operations GFL Environmental gbz_webcast_date Thu, 12/10/2020 – 10:00 – Thu, 12/10/2020 – 11:00

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How AI and Robotics are Transforming Recycling

Episode 245: How President-elect Joe Biden could help U.S. farmers

November 13, 2020 by  
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Episode 245: How President-elect Joe Biden could help U.S. farmers Heather Clancy Fri, 11/13/2020 – 02:00 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (6:25). Linking S with E in the renewable energy sector How tenants continue to press for greener commercial buildings, despite COVID-19 7 ways to bridge the blue finance gap to protect the oceans Features How companies can engage authentically with communities (18:20)   Highlights from our VERGE 20 mainstage conversation with environmental justice leaders Rahwa Ghirmatzion, executive director of People United for Sustainable Housing (PUSH), and Elizabeth Yeampierre, executive director of UPROSE. There’s no one formula, but it starts with being transparent and willing to listen. How President-elect Joe Biden could support regenerative agriculture, Black farmers (24:45)   What would those focused on sustainable food systems like the incoming administration to prioritize? For a start, the U.S. Department of Agriculture could use existing funding and programs to encourage soil health. Plus, let’s see better support for the Black farming community. GreenBiz Food Analyst Jim Giles weighs in with suggestions.   *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “Curiosity,” “I’m Going for a Coffee,” “Here’s the Thing,” “Waiting for the Moment That Never Comes” and “Knowing the Truth” *This episode was sponsored by Shell Resources galore Behavior change and the circular economy. How innovation and new business models alter people’s relationship with waste. Join the discussion at 8 p.m. EST Nov. 12.  Missing pieces of decarbonization. Join us for a discussion on how 100 percent renewable power can practically, affordably and quickly become a reality. Register for this webcast at 1 p.m. EST Nov. 19. Do we have a newsletter for you! We produce six weekly newsletters: GreenBuzz by Executive Editor Joel Makower (Monday); Transport Weekly by Senior Writer and Analyst Katie Fehrenbacher (Tuesday); VERGE Weekly by Executive Director Shana Rappaport and Editorial Director Heather Clancy (Wednesday); Energy Weekly by Senior Energy Analyst Sarah Golden (Thursday); Food Weekly by Carbon and Food Analyst Jim Giles (Thursday); and Circular Weekly by Director and Senior Analyst Lauren Phipps (Friday). You must subscribe to each newsletter in order to receive it. Please visit this page to choose which you want to receive. The GreenBiz Intelligence Panel is the survey body we poll regularly throughout the year on key trends and developments in sustainability. To become part of the panel, click here . Enrolling is free and should take two minutes. Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Jim Giles Topics Podcast Policy & Politics VERGE 20 Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 35:11 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 245: How President-elect Joe Biden could help U.S. farmers

Episode 243: VERGE voices with Apple’s Lisa Jackson, 350.org’s Bill McKibben

October 30, 2020 by  
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Episode 243: VERGE voices with Apple’s Lisa Jackson, 350.org’s Bill McKibben Heather Clancy Fri, 10/30/2020 – 00:10 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (4:30). Carbontech is getting ready for its market moment The top 25 most sustainable fleets Why Google, BASF and Sephora are coming together on safer chemistry Features VERGE 20 mainstage highlights (16:55)   Lisa Jackson, vice president of environment, policy and social initiatives at Apple , reflects on the intersection of racial inequity and climate strategy; how it’s shaping the company’s circular economy strategy. Andrew Zolli, head of global impact initiatives at Planet , on making the most of our “long emergency”  Bill McKibben, co-founder of 350.org, on how companies can be more authentic in their storytelling 5 questions with JPMorgan Chase (31:35)   Marisa Buchanan is managing director and head of sustainability for the financial services firm. She chats about JPMorgan Chase’s new financing commitment aligned with the Paris Agreement, how it’s helping clients with their carbon mitigation journeys, and its strategy for supporting stronger community resilience.  A ‘Fixation’ with fixing things (41:30)   Sandra Goldmark, is a theater design artisan and founder of social enterprise Fixup , which runs repair and reuse events. She urges us to reimagine our relationships with stuff, especially broken stuff. In this segment, the Right to Repair movement advocate discusses her new book, “Fixation: How to have stuff without breaking the planet.” Read an excerpt here . *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “Curiosity,” “Waiting for the Moment that Never Comes,” “Knowing the Truth,” “Night Caves” and “I’m Going for a Coffee”  *This episode was sponsored by Amazon and IHG, and features VERGE 20 sponsor JPMorgan Chase. Resources galore Lessons in resilience from the produce industry. Subject matter experts from Kwik Lok, Walmart and Second Harvest Food Bank join us at 1 p.m. EST Nov. 10 to discuss responding to disruption and how to balance food safety and security to minimize food waste. Behavior change and the circular economy. How innovation and new business models alter people’s relationship with waste. Join the discussion at 8 p.m. EST Nov. 12.  Missing pieces of decarbonization. Join us for a discussion on how 100 percent renewable power can practically, affordably and quickly become a reality. Register for this webcast at 1 p.m. EST Nov. 19. Do we have a newsletter for you! We produce six weekly newsletters: GreenBuzz by Executive Editor Joel Makower (Monday); Transport Weekly by Senior Writer and Analyst Katie Fehrenbacher (Tuesday); VERGE Weekly by Executive Director Shana Rappaport and Editorial Director Heather Clancy (Wednesday); Energy Weekly by Senior Energy Analyst Sarah Golden (Thursday); Food Weekly by Carbon and Food Analyst Jim Giles (Thursday); and Circular Weekly by Director and Senior Analyst Lauren Phipps (Friday). You must subscribe to each newsletter in order to receive it. Please visit this page to choose which you want to receive. The GreenBiz Intelligence Panel is the survey body we poll regularly throughout the year on key trends and developments in sustainability. To become part of the panel, click here . Enrolling is free and should take two minutes. Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Deonna Anderson Topics Podcast Circular Economy Policy & Politics VERGE 20 Finance Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 58:59 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 243: VERGE voices with Apple’s Lisa Jackson, 350.org’s Bill McKibben

Zeabuz is launching a self-driving electric ferry in Norway

October 28, 2020 by  
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Norwegian company Zeabuz has announced that it will be launching a self-driving ferry next year. This zero-emission ferry was first developed in 2018 by researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). The ferry is expected to carry 12 passengers and will operate like an elevator, with passengers able to call the ferry to their location by pressing a button. The launch of the first self-driving electric ferry in Norway just goes to show the strides the country is making in developing water transport . In 2015, Norway was the first country to launch the world’s first electric car and passenger ferry . Related: 100% electric passenger vehicle and cargo ferry could help decarbonize sea travel According to Narve Mjøs, the director of DNV GL — a company that advises the maritime industry and organizes the Green Shipping Program in Norway — the country is on the right track when it comes to pioneering new technologies in water transport. Mjøs said that the use of new boats, like the one being launched by Zeabuz, provides a greener alternative to road transport. Further, he said that the process of automation via self-driving helps cut down operation costs. The newly launched ferry will operate along the canal that connects the port and the city center of Trondheim. Passengers will have a 1-minute travel time, rather than the 15 minutes it typically takes to walk between the two locations. The ferry also has the capacity to transport passenger bicycles, and it is designed to charge while docked. Riding the ferry will be free of charge, at least in Trondheim. Many countries are turning back to water transport, which was a popular means of travel before the invention of cars. For instance, Bangkok intends to launch 30 new electric ferries and 5,000 electric water taxis come next year. In July 2020, Uber announced plans to launch boat taxis along the Thames River in London. If such plans are actualized, we are likely to see a future with fewer cars and more zero-emission boats. + Zeabuz Via CNN Images via Zeabuz

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Zeabuz is launching a self-driving electric ferry in Norway

Episode 241: Thinking long-term with three sustainability think tanks

October 16, 2020 by  
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Episode 241: Thinking long-term with three sustainability think tanks Heather Clancy Fri, 10/16/2020 – 02:00 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (4:08). A plan for “Lithium Valley” begins to take shape Grocery retailers will feel the sting of pollinator declines Are lawyers and accountants doing enough on climate change? Features Building the B Corp movement (16:40)   While some large multinationals including Danone and Natura have embraced the B Corp certification, others have been slower to move. That was a catalyst for the new B Movement Builders initiative, launched in September. Marcelo Behar, vice president for sustainability and group affairs for Natura & Co., chats about why his organization became a mentor. ERM wants to help institutionalize sustainability (26:44) This week, global consultancy ERM launched the SustainAbility Insitute, created to define, institutionalize and scale sustainability performance. Keryn James, ERM’s group chief executive, and Mark Lee, head of the new organization, drop by to chat about the mission.  Can we use disruption to create true transformation? (35:20) The past month has seen the publication of dozens of reports highlighting paths to action for corporate sustainability as the world looks forward to life after the COVID-19 pandemic. This week, the Forum for the Future added to that body of work with its map of the multiple pathways ahead of us, “From System Shock to System Change — Time to Transform.” We spoke with the forum’s CEO, Sally Uren, about what’s ahead, and why decisions of the next six to 18 months are critical. A collaborative approach to “Drawdown” (44:45) This week also marks the launch of Drawdown Labs, formed to help companies test how to use their resources, partners, employees and customers to reduce carbon emissions, not just avoid it. Some early participants: Allbirds; Google; Grove Collaborative; IDEO; Impossible Foods; Intuit; Lime; and Trane Technologies. Jaime Alexander, director of Drawdown Labs, weighs in on how they’re leading.  *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere: “Curiosity,” “Keeping Stuff Together,” “Night Caves,” “How I Used to See the Stars,” “Southside,” “As I Was Saying” and “Sad Marimba Planet”  *This episode was sponsored by IHG Resources galore Lessons in resilience from the produce industry. Subject matter experts from Kwik Lok, Walmart and Second Harvest Food Bank join us at 1 p.m. EST Nov. 10 to discuss responding to disruption and how to balance food safety and security to minimize food waste. Do we have a newsletter for you! We produce six weekly newsletters: GreenBuzz by Executive Editor Joel Makower (Monday); Transport Weekly by Senior Writer and Analyst Katie Fehrenbacher (Tuesday); VERGE Weekly by Executive Director Shana Rappaport and Editorial Director Heather Clancy (Wednesday); Energy Weekly by Senior Energy Analyst Sarah Golden (Thursday); Food Weekly by Carbon and Food Analyst Jim Giles (Thursday); and Circular Weekly by Director and Senior Analyst Lauren Phipps (Friday). You must subscribe to each newsletter in order to receive it. Please visit this page to choose which you want to receive. The GreenBiz Intelligence Panel is the survey body we poll regularly throughout the year on key trends and developments in sustainability. To become part of the panel, click here . Enrolling is free and should take two minutes. Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Topics Podcast Corporate Strategy Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 54:12 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 241: Thinking long-term with three sustainability think tanks

Fossil fuel companies denied seismic blasting permit renewals

October 7, 2020 by  
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On October 1, a status conference on seismic litigation ruled in favor of the environment by prohibiting fossil fuel companies from using seismic airguns in offshore oil exploration. Fossil fuel companies have long disrupted marine life and coastal communities by using such airguns while exploring offshore oil sources. But the new decision means that once current permits expire on November 30, companies will not be allowed to renew them. The decision now hands victory to environmental organizations, marine species and coastal communities. There has been an ongoing battle surrounding seismic blasting permits, also known as as Incidental Harassment Authorizations (IHAs). These permits allow fossil fuel companies to use seismic testing in search of oil and gas deposits beneath the ocean. Related: Nine more states join seismic blasting lawsuit against the Trump administration During the hearing, the lawyers representing the federal government recognized that IHAs expire next month with no room to extend them. Michael Jasny, the director of NRDC’s Marine Mammal Protection Project, applauded the decision. He termed the use of seismic blasts as “senseless” actions that harm the environment. Seismic blasts are fired as regularly as every 10 seconds. For weeks or even months, these sounds disrupt marine species, including whales and many types of fish, that depend on sound to navigate and hunt. Long periods of seismic blasting make it challenging for such species to find food for survival. The news revives hope within scientific and conservation communities. In recent years, scientists have warned that continued seismic blasting combined with other threats, such as ship strikes, could lead to the extinction of North Atlantic right whales. Due to such risks, the Obama administration denied seismic blasting permits to fossil fuel companies in 2017. In November 2018, the Trump administration issued fresh IHAs. This move was met by backlash from NRDC, 10 states and several businesses and coastal communities, who collectively took the matter to court. Although the ruling ended in a victory, Jasny says that more efforts still have to be made to seal any loopholes and end seismic blasting once and for all. Via CleanTechnica Image via Amy Humphries

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Fossil fuel companies denied seismic blasting permit renewals

Embedding Social and Environmental Benefits in Renewable Energy

September 30, 2020 by  
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Embedding Social and Environmental Benefits in Renewable Energy Renewable energy deployments are on the rise. The U.S. alone is expected to add 132 to 157GW of new renewable energy capacity in the next five years. How and where that renewable energy is deployed can drive radically different outcomes — with the potential to maximize positive impact for a range of stakeholders or limit benefits to just a few.  Traditionally, renewable energy procurement and project selection focuses on financial and logistical criteria (e.g. price, risk, volume, location, timing). These are essential criteria but they do not provide a comprehensive view of everything that matters. Some renewable energy projects displace more fossil fuels than others, some are built at the cost of critical habitat for plants and animals, and others share jobs and infrastructure benefits with the local community. By incorporating additional social and environmental criteria (e.g. additionality, land use, emission avoidance, job creation) into the renewable energy procurement process, buyers can conduct a holistic evaluation of projects and better identify the ‘best’ renewable energy projects. In this webcast you’ll learn: Why a holistic approach to renewable energy procurement is important How a large company has applied this approach and received buy-in from the full organization How you can incorporate a number of critical environmental and social criteria into your evaluation process Moderator: Sarah Golden, Senior Energy Analyst & VERGE Energy Chair, GreenBiz Speakers: Megan Lorenzen, Sustainability Manager, Salesforce Bruce McKenney, Director for Strategic Initiatives, Energy & Infrastructure, The Nature Conservancy  Henry Richardson, Senior Analyst, WattTime.org Alex Klonick, Manager, REBA If you can’t tune in live, please register and we will email you a link to access the archived webcast footage and resources, available to you on-demand after the webcast. taylor flores Wed, 09/30/2020 – 07:52 Sarah Golden Senior Energy Analyst & VERGE Energy Chair GreenBiz Group @sbgolden gbz_webcast_date Thu, 10/15/2020 – 10:00 – Thu, 10/15/2020 – 11:00

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Embedding Social and Environmental Benefits in Renewable Energy

Shifting your Business Model: How to Resale

September 15, 2020 by  
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Shifting your Business Model: How to Resale How can your company implement a resale business model? The resale of used, worn or simply returned consumer products, also known as recommerce, holds tremendous promise for the retail industry. Beyond diverting substantial landfill waste, resale represents a rapidly growing revenue opportunity with a market valued at $20 billion in the apparel industry alone. But despite clear environmental benefits and new financial opportunities, only a handful of companies are implementing secondary sales models. From reverse logistics, quality control, customer expectations and revenue cannibalization concerns, companies must overcome a multitude of considerations and complexities. Join this breakout to learn how organizations at the forefront of the recommerce industry are tackling these challenges, and what it took them to build an effective, lucrative resale business model. Speakers Gwen Cunningham, Lead Circle Textiles Programme, Circle Economy Cynthia Power, Director, EILEEN FISHER Renew Holly Secon Mon, 09/14/2020 – 22:37 Featured Off

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