New Swedish grocery to price goods based on carbon footprint

October 8, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Felix, a Swedish food brand, has opened a climate-conscious store that will guide buyers to make informed decisions when purchasing food items. In the newly opened store, items are priced based on their carbon footprint . To help buyers understand the impact of their choices on the environment, products in The Climate Store will be bought using carbon equivalents currency (CO2e). The store has allocated each customer a weekly budget of 18.9kg CO2e. This means that customers will have to choose foods carefully, avoiding options with higher carbon footprints to avoid blowing their budgets. Pricing foods based on their climate impact shows the difference between plant-based foods and animal-derived foods. Many of the foods that we consume are greatly contributing to the pollution of the environment. Although many people would love to make a difference by avoiding such foods, it’s not always clear which items are worse for the planet. Food production is responsible for about one-quarter of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions. If customers can be aware of the foods that contribute most carbon, they can make decisions that will help reduce these emissions . Related: Precycle, a zero-waste grocery story, opens in Brooklyn “It will be exciting to see how customers react to trading with the CO2e currency and see if they manage to stay within their weekly budget,” Thomas Sjöberg, marketing manager for Felix, said. “I think it will be an eye-opener for many to see how certain choices affect what [they] can afford to get in the same lunch bag.” The opening of The Climate Store is just one part of the brand’s long-term sustainability plan. Felix intends to implement comprehensive features that will help its customers make informed choices when purchasing. Come this fall, the brand will be adding labels to all its products to indicate their impact on the environment. Felix expects such labels to help customers reduce the use of environmentally impactful products and increase the intake of plant-based products. Via VegNews and New Food Image via Pixabay

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New Swedish grocery to price goods based on carbon footprint

Global warming could push air conditioning demand up 59%

August 21, 2020 by  
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An analysis done by Climate Central shows that demand for air conditioning in the U.S. will increase by 59% by the year 2050. According to the study, there has been a continued rise in demand for air conditioners in the U.S. and other parts of the world because of global warming. The study shows that continued greenhouse gas emissions are leading to unpredictable weather patterns in most regions. Regions that were traditionally colder are warming up, and those that are warm are getting hotter. These changes are forcing more people to use air conditioners to regulate home temperatures. The study was based on data collected from 242 U.S. cities. The data tracks down air conditioning usage via a measure known as cooling-degree days (CDD). Cooling-degree days simply refers to the difference between the accepted temperature for human comfort and the daily average temperature. The human body is expected to feel comfortable at 65°F. Any temperature below or above 65°F can lead to discomfort, hence the demand for air conditioning. If a region experiences a daily average temperature of 80°F, the CDD for that location would be 15. Related: Global warming expected to exceed 1.5 degrees Celsius Analysts behind the study have revealed that 96% of the cities in the U.S. have experienced an increase in CDD between 1970 and 2019. Some of the states that have been widely affected by high CDD include Texas, Nevada and Arizona. Higher temperatures are pushing more people to purchase air conditioners. Today, many people use some form of air conditioning to control the temperatures in their homes and offices. Sean Sublette, a meteorologist at Climate Central, said that the average person uses air conditioning to deal with higher temperatures without thinking about climate change , which is only made worse by increased reliance on air conditioners. “When our air conditioning is powered by electricity generated through fossil fuels, heat-trapping CO2 is released,” Climate Central explained. “Air conditioners emit heat back outside and can add to the heat island effect in urban areas. And if old air conditioners are not disposed of properly, they can leak chemicals that are themselves harmful heat-trapping gases.” + Climate Central Via Yale Environment 360 Image via TrioSolution1

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Global warming could push air conditioning demand up 59%

Earth911 Inspiration: Not Too Small To Make a Difference

June 12, 2020 by  
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Today’s quote is from the 14th Dalai Lama: “If you … The post Earth911 Inspiration: Not Too Small To Make a Difference appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Earth911 Inspiration: Not Too Small To Make a Difference

How many hours-of-safety do our homes have in extreme weather?

August 15, 2019 by  
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How long homes can maintain the last comfortable temperature during extreme weather can make the difference between life and death.

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How many hours-of-safety do our homes have in extreme weather?

Burger King unveils the plant-based Impossible Whopper

April 3, 2019 by  
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The Impossible Burger is coming to a Burger King near you. The fast food chain is releasing a new burger with a vegetarian patty called the Impossible Whopper. The company is teaming up with the creators of Impossible Foods to bring a plant-based vegetarian option to nearly 60 Burger Kings in the St. Louis area and potentially to thousands across the country. Burger King hopes the Impossible Whopper will quickly become the new staple for people looking to swap meat for plant-based options. To that end, Burger King is partnering with Impossible Foods to bring the vegetarian patty to a much wider audience than ever before. The vegetarian option will include the same toppings and bun as the regular Whopper and will cost about $1 more. Related: We tried the new Impossible Burger at CES — here’s what we thought Impossible Foods has collaborated with other burger joints in the past. The company featured its Impossible Burger in more than one thousand Carl’s Jr. franchises. It also partnered with White Castle , which sold a slider variety of the food in a little under 400 of its establishments. But the new deal with Burger King is much larger in scale. In fact, the fast food chain plans to release the burger in more than 7,000 restaurants across the United States. That is well over double the amount of venues that currently offer the Impossible Burger. The head of marketing for Burger King, Fernando Machado, said that early tests confirm that people have not been able to tell the difference between the old beef Whopper and the new plant-based one. “People on my team who know the Whopper inside and out, they try it and they struggle to differentiate which one is which,” Machado shared. Burger King is featuring the Impossible Whopper in 59 restaurants in St. Louis to start before expanding to other locations. If things in St. Louis go smoothly, then the company plans to release the Impossible Burger to its other restaurants. Machado believes that the new burger will be a major hit with customers and has every intention in spreading it to other locations. The company hopes that offering the Impossible Burger in multiple venues across the U.S. will encourage people to stop eating beef and opt for a more eco-friendly diet. + Impossible Foods Via NY Times Image via Impossible Foods

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Burger King unveils the plant-based Impossible Whopper

Episode 149: ‘Thoughtful’ carbon policy, Home Depot thinks circular, Royal Caribbean floats new energy strategy

November 16, 2018 by  
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Plus, what’s the difference between energy efficiency and energy productivity? The Climate Group recharges its EP100 campaign.

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Episode 149: ‘Thoughtful’ carbon policy, Home Depot thinks circular, Royal Caribbean floats new energy strategy

Sustainable finance ideals thrive in Asia

November 16, 2018 by  
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From Malaysia to Australia, more investors are funding renewable energy, sustainable supply chains and other efforts to future-proof economies against climate change.

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Sustainable finance ideals thrive in Asia

Is your business wasting money on waste?

November 16, 2018 by  
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Excess product poses a material risk to your company and to the planet. Here’s how to recover those losses.

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Is your business wasting money on waste?

Why Recycling Paper Makes a Big Difference to the Planet

June 27, 2018 by  
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Put it in the trash or save it for the … The post Why Recycling Paper Makes a Big Difference to the Planet appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Why Recycling Paper Makes a Big Difference to the Planet

Mirrored nativity in Italy invites passersby to reflectliterallyfor the holidays

December 29, 2017 by  
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The holiday season is a time for reflection—a tradition that Italian studio thesignlab took to its literal meaning with the installation of a nativity crib clad in mirrored panels. Located in the center of Tuscany’s Piazza San Michele, the contemporary pavilion’s use of mirrors invites passersby to observe and celebrate the diversity of the people around them. The reflective building, named Welcome Difference, appears to disappear in the historic plaza during the day but calls attention to itself at night thanks to a glowing light display. Welcome Difference was created as part of Andare oltre si può’s annual XMAS LIGHT program, now in its fifth iteration. The mirrored installation is a modern interpretation of the traditional nativity scene with the central figures of the story reduced to simple glyphs. At night, these characters and the accompanying symbols light up. Related: Mirror-covered ‘Mirage’ house disappears into the California desert “It is a magical nativity scene in which everyone can be reflected in the Nativity family,” said Welcome Difference creator Domenico Raimondi. “Visitors can reflect, reflect, look inside but above all see who stands next. With Welcome Difference, the differences are presented, flanked, shown and invited to reflect on the theme of Christmas . We firmly believe that we must not be afraid of differences and differences, especially in this period.” Welcome Difference was unveiled on November 24 and will be displayed until January 8, 2018. + thesignlab

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Mirrored nativity in Italy invites passersby to reflectliterallyfor the holidays

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