Scientists observe ‘diamond rain’ similar to that found on icy giant planets

August 24, 2017 by  
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You may have heard that icy planets like Neptune and Uranus experience diamond rain. But now, scientists have been able to mimic conditions of those planets and observe diamond rain at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in California. Since it’s difficult for us at this point to directly observe the interiors of these planets, such research could help scientists better understand and classify worlds. For a long time, scientists have hypothesized that diamond rain arises over 5,000 miles below the surface of planets like Neptune and Uranus. In this recent experiment, a group of researchers simulated the conditions of these planets “by creating shock waves in plastic with an intense optical laser ” in the laboratory , according to a recent press release. They were able to observe that almost every carbon atom of the plastic was incorporated into diamond structures. The diamonds were tiny – only around a few nanometers wide – but on Uranus and Neptune, the researchers think the falling diamonds could weigh millions of carats. Related: Mysterious object near Neptune just made space a lot weirder Study lead author Dominik Kraus of research center Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf said in a statement, “We can’t go inside the planets and look at them, so these laboratory experiments complement satellite and telescope observations.” The scientists think diamond rain could produce an energy source, generating heat as it falls. Beyond observing a neat phenomenon, the experiment could help scientists learn about how elements mix together under pressure in the interiors of planets, providing them with more information on a planet’s defining features. These researchers plan to apply their methods to study the processes of other planets as well. Nature Astronomy published the study online this week. 23 scientists of institutions in Germany, Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom contributed to the research. Via SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Images via Greg Stewart/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

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Scientists observe ‘diamond rain’ similar to that found on icy giant planets

Lab-Grown Diamonds Could Make the Mining Industry Obsolete

April 30, 2014 by  
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Diamond mining takes a terrible toll on both human life and the environment , but lab-grown gems, which are now just as pure as natural ones and produce one-fifth the carbon dioxide emissions, could provide a viable alternative. Not only is the carbon footprint of the gems much smaller, but laboratories don’t require forced child labor to make their diamonds. So far, the artificial variety only account for 2 percent of the world’s jewelry market, but they have the potential to make mining obsolete. Read the rest of Lab-Grown Diamonds Could Make the Mining Industry Obsolete Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: a girl’s best friend , are lab-grown diamonds as pure as natural ones , artificial diamonds could offer a solution to forced child labour in Africa , artificial diamonds produce less carbon emissions that mined ones , diamonds without mines , lab grown diamonds , lab-grown diamonds are a sustainable alternative to natural ones , man made diamonds , sustainable mining practices vs lab-grown diamonds

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Lab-Grown Diamonds Could Make the Mining Industry Obsolete

INFOGRAPHIC: Where do Blood Diamonds Come From?

March 5, 2014 by  
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You may have heard of “ blood diamonds ” before – but do you know where they come from and why the should be stopped? Blood diamonds are gemstones mined in war zones to finance insurgency, an invading army’s efforts, or a warlord’s activity. One fourth of the world’s rough diamonds are blood diamonds, and their sale is estimated to total $3.8 billion dollars every year; a quarter of that figure is enough to buy over 4 million AK-47s. To learn more, check out the new infographic from Master’s in Business after the break! The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Read the rest of INFOGRAPHIC: Where do Blood Diamonds Come From? Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: blood diamonds , conflict diamonds , conflict gemstones , diamond , environmental destruction , global development , infographic , kimberly process , war , war zone        

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INFOGRAPHIC: Where do Blood Diamonds Come From?

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