Origami-inspired clothing line that grows with kids wins Dyson award

September 7, 2017 by  
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The cost of keeping a growing child clothed is oftentimes staggering, which is why this expanding origami-inspired range of children’s clothing was awarded this year’s UK  James Dyson award . Ryan Yasin, frustrated by the waste in the children’s clothing industry, used scientific principles he studied for his degree in aeronautical engineering to produce incredible clothing that grows with the child who wears it. The origami-inspired line is called Petit Pli, and the London-based postgraduate describes it as “the most advanced kids’ clothing in the world.” The clothing is made from distinctive pleated lightweight fabric which is machine washable, waterproof and recyclable . One article of clothing will fit a three-month-old until he or she is three years old. According to a recent survey by Aviva , parents spend an average £2,000 on clothing before their child reaches the age of three. This is because most children grow seven sizes in their first two years of life. Not only does mass production of garments put huge pressure on the environment through waste, water consumption, and carbon emissions , it takes a toll on parents’ wallets. The Guardian reports that the trousers and tops Yasin designed mimic version of sought-after clothing by legendary Japans designer Issey Miyake . However, Yasin’s version can be worn for years and are incredibly durable. The Petit Pli clothing line employs the negative Poisson’s ratio, which Yasin studied at London’s Imperial College. Materials that have this ratio (known as auxetics) become thicker and can expand in two directions at the same time.So far, the designer has created more than 500 prototypes for Petit Pli and intends to use his £2,000 ($2,615.63 USD) prize money from the Dyson award to partner with investors and expand the business. Reportedly, he is in talks with major retailers in the UK and hopes to sell the clothing in stores within a few months. Related: James Dyson Wants to Use His Famous Vacuum Technology to Clean Rivers Said Yasin, “It’s just great to have that backing and recognition of my solution. The prize money is an added bonus, but I know how I will use it. In addition to supporting my R&D, it will help me form an interdisciplinary team of experts to take Petit Pli to the next level: putting it in the hands of parents worldwide and making a tangible difference to the way we consume resources in the fashion industry .” The designer will keep the garments at an affordable price while ensuring everyone along the supply chain is paid ethically . The Petit Pli line will now be entered into the international competition of the James Dyson Award. Winners will be announced in October, and the top invention will receive £30,000 ($39,225.00 USD) in prize money. + Petit Pli Via The Guardian Images via Petit Pli 

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Origami-inspired clothing line that grows with kids wins Dyson award

Colorful hut made of 2,500 LEGO-like bricks invites visitors to return to their childhood

September 7, 2017 by  
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Montpellier’s summer  Festival des Architectures Vives is a fun annual event that sees various architectural installations from emerging designers tucked into various courtyards around the city. This year’s exhibitions are all unique, but one funky hut made of 2,500 plastic bricks brings some vibrant color to the event. Created by Atelier Micromega , La Madeleine is a large cube structure that invites adults and kids alike to explore its LEGO-inspired fun. The yearly event is aimed at fostering the relationship between historic urban environments and contemporary architecture . Every year, various teams of young architects and designers install their unique installations in the city’s many courtyards. The 2017 edition is showcasing ten emerging design firms whose work was designed to reflect this year’s theme of “emotion.” Related: These LEGO-like recycled plastic bricks create sturdy homes for just $5,200 Atelier Micromega, whose team includes five young architects, installed La Madeleine in hopes of bringing visitors back to their childhood. Thousands of colorful plastic bricks were used to create the hut, complete with an open-air skylight in the ceiling. Some of the bricks on the interior are interchangeable so visitors can modify the bricks to change the hut’s interior during their visit. According to the team, their design was inspired by nostalgia, “The installation rests on architecture, space and matter to play with our nostalgia. It invites the visitor to be moved by traveling through it, interacting with it, echoing his childhood memories. The smooth, perfect cube refers to adulthood. The world that it contains: evolutionary, creative and malleable appeals to the child, making the space of the cave his cabin.” After the event, all of the plastic bricks will be donated to several child-care facilities around Montpellier as well as the national charity organization, Les Restos du Coeur . + Atelier Microméga Via v2com Photography via Paul Kozlowski  

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Colorful hut made of 2,500 LEGO-like bricks invites visitors to return to their childhood

Minimalist Urban Nomad Kit lets travelers carry traces of home in a small wooden basket

January 17, 2017 by  
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Living a nomadic lifestyle just got a little more Zen thanks to the Japanese-inspired Nomad Life Kit. Mexican designer Geraldo Osio has created a minimalist wooden basket that carries a handful of basic necessities inside so travelers can have a sense of a home anywhere they go. All of the items in the kit are all manufactured by Japanese craftsmen and made of natural materials. Although the tiny wooden box may seem like a simple picnic basket, the idea behind the design is much more sentimental. Osio wanted to provide wanderers with a true sense of belonging while on the road. As the designer explains on his website , “This kind of lifestyle creates a tendency of losing a sense of belonging to a place.” Related: Tiny Helix Shelter made of laster-cut recycled cardboard is a temporary habitat for one Inside the box, nomads will find items that age as they use them. The leather straps on the box will soften and darken over time and the copper tableware set found on the inside will patina. The stone candle and incense holder are included in the set to offer the owner a familiar sense of smell and light wherever they may go. And if they ever find themselves without a place to rest or sleep, a simple straw mat and cushion will provide comfort for a quick rest or overnight stay . + Gerardo Osio Via Fast Codesign Images via Gerardo Osio

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Minimalist Urban Nomad Kit lets travelers carry traces of home in a small wooden basket

Margot Krasojevi 3D prints recycled plastic into a delicate Lace LED lamp

January 11, 2017 by  
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Architect and designer Margot Krasojevi? shows off the beautiful possibilities of 3D printing in her latest work, the Lace LED. Made from recycled post-consumer plastics, the LED light diffuser gets its lace-like quality from its layers of geometric shapes that fan out from a central point. The Lace LED is designed as a suspended work of kinetic art . The diffuser is hinged on a pivot that rotates within a frame to create different patterns of light and shadow. “These complex shapes direct LED light through the entire pattern, which diffuses, deflects and refracts light creating a moving shadow whilst focusing it,” write Margot Krasojevi? Architects. “The form is the antithesis of the mass-produced recycled bottles and waste used in its fabrication.” Related: Designer David Grass 3D-Prints Light Bulbs in the Shape of Modern Cityscapes The diffuser’s intricate parametric pattern was created from a digital modeling program. In addition to recycled plastic , the Lace LED is 3D printed in ceramic, polymer, silver, and brass. + Margot Krasojevi? Via v2com Images via Margot Krasojevi?

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Margot Krasojevi 3D prints recycled plastic into a delicate Lace LED lamp

Self-sustaining Cradle to Cradle mountain hut is designed to generate its own energy

June 15, 2016 by  
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The Huba mountain hut puts a modern twist on traditional alpine architecture and comprises two main parts: a power module and a living module. In case of damage, each module can be separated and repaired independently. The Huba living module, made primarily from locally sourced fallen trees, sleeps up to four in collapsible beds and is also equipped with a wall heater, sink, and LED lighting. The Power Module, on the other hand, is made out of recycled aluminum and contains a wind turbine, made from recycled plastic using a method called roto-molding, and a battery. The roof is angled to optimize collection of rainwater, which is filtered and used for the sink, drinking, and outside shower. Related: These spectacular alpine cabins will awaken your inner adventurer The modules are designed for easily assembly and disassembly, and are strong enough to withstand harsh winds and heavy rainfall. The Huba could also be integrated with a rental app to give travelers easy access to information about Huba locations and the opportunity to recommend locations for future huts. “Huba as a system works to provide for users a simple, trustful system, in which the bigger number of smaller shelters can serve as a unified accommodation at different stages of travel,” writes the designer. “It is designed to promote sustainable, and circular design to the public, thus creating a better awareness of challenges and possibilities.” + Cradle to Cradle Product Design Challenge Images by Malgorzata Blachnicka

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Self-sustaining Cradle to Cradle mountain hut is designed to generate its own energy

IKEA announces new Tom Dixon collaboration that could redefine how we use our homes

June 9, 2016 by  
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IKEA just announced a collaboration with designer extraordinaire Tom Dixon that will help redefine how you use your home. Recognizing that people no longer want to use their spaces for one purpose – a living room is no longer just for socializing, a bedroom is no longer just for sleeping – Dixon is taking cues from an IKEA classic to bring us something completely new. The company is also collaborating with HAY to redesign the iconic blue bag and on a few furniture pieces for the home. Dixon’s design is still “top secret” according to the designer. But he did reveal that it would be a piece that would be comfortable and could be used in multiple ways every day. Dixon said he looked at the KLIPPAN sofa and noted that it, like most sofas today, is made using crude manufacturing methods involving staples and “ugly” bits of wood. He wants to challenge that. He said the new piece will be stripped back to the platform and will feature a few designs based on that basic piece. The new piece will feature aluminum, and Dixon revealed a piece of that platform – made right in Sweden – will be used on a bed, which Dixon says everyone needs, whether they are “in prison, or in hospital… or on their deathbed.” But when you don’t need a bed, the piece could be transformed into a sofa. It will comprise a completely new way of constructing comfort and could conceivably be one of the few pieces of furniture you would need to have in your home. Related: IKEA launches indoor garden that can grow food all year-round Dixon hopes the piece could replace KLIPPAN altogether and last for generations. He likened the concept to his own sort of IKEA hack – taking something that already exists and turning it into something new. Dixon says that he wanted to call the piece “Tom,” but IKEA has other plans, of course. IKEA also announced a collaboration with Danish designers HAY , which revealed a new design for the iconic blue and yellow IKEA bag at Democratic Design Days 2016. This is the first time the well-known bag is getting a facelift. HAY also plans to create a few additional pieces that build on IKEA’s sustainability. Both collections will launch in 2017. Images via Kristine Lofgren for Inhabitat and IKEA

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IKEA announces new Tom Dixon collaboration that could redefine how we use our homes

14 green furniture designs using reclaimed, recycled or rapidly renewable materials

May 24, 2016 by  
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Fiber Chair by MUUTO Designer Iskos-Berlin at MUUTO combines midcentury modern with a modern flair. The fiber chair is made from Microfiber, form-pressed composition of plastic and wood fibers from left over from furniture scraps. Look closely and you can see the beautiful gradient of colors in throughout the smooth finish. Terrace Table by Lubo Design What do you get when you take apart an old barn? Lubo Brezina’s amazing Terrace Table. Pieces of an old barn floor are harmoniously arranged…

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14 green furniture designs using reclaimed, recycled or rapidly renewable materials

Wintervacht is transforming unwanted blankets cozy winter jackets

February 13, 2016 by  
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Wintervacht is transforming unwanted blankets cozy, snuggly jackets that give new meaning to the term “blanket coat”. Wintervacht means “winter fur” in Dutch, and the idea was inspired by one of the designer’s chilly childhood. “Manon lived in a house without any heating so she had three old woolen blankets on top of her bed,” van Oorsouw explained to Ecouterre . We think they look like just the thing for the bitter winter days ahead. READ MORE >

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Wintervacht is transforming unwanted blankets cozy winter jackets

Yves Béhar showcases his sweet handmade surfboard in a temporary Miami Surf Shack

December 16, 2015 by  
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San Francisco designer Yves Béhar built a temporary installation as a showroom for his handcrafted surfboards in Miami Design District. The wooden Surf Shack is accompanied by an exhibition called Connecting, where the designer showcased his original sketches, prototypes and the well-known activity-tracking wristband Jawbone and the One Laptop Per Child project. Read the rest of Yves Béhar showcases his sweet handmade surfboard in a temporary Miami Surf Shack

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Yves Béhar showcases his sweet handmade surfboard in a temporary Miami Surf Shack

Carter Zufelt uses an ingenious new process to create art out of recycled plastic trash

December 4, 2015 by  
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Did you know that a plastic bag can take up to 1,000 years to break down? This designer has developed a process that turns those old plastic garbage bags into stable beautiful works of art. Carter Zufelt, an industrial designer currently based in Utah, began heavily focusing on the problem of plastic waste a couple years ago when he began his senior thesis. Through his research he found alarming statistics about the amount of plastic trash in the environment. Each year an estimated 1 trillion plastic bags are consumed worldwide. Unfortunately, less than 5% of those plastic grocery bags are recycled in the U.S., which means that roughly 95,000,000,000 plastic bags are floating around the world every single year! With this knowledge he began experimenting. Through extensive trial and error he refined his process and began consistently reducing plastic trash from the environment. He is now running a Kickstarter for a few of his unique pieces. + Mull on Kickstarter

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Carter Zufelt uses an ingenious new process to create art out of recycled plastic trash

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