A vacant lot in New Orleans is converted into resilient and affordable housing for war veterans

July 2, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A vacant lot in New Orleans is converted into resilient and affordable housing for war veterans

New Orleans-based firm Office of Jonathan Tate has unveiled a modern residential complex for combat veterans and their families. Located in the Gentilly district of the city, the Bastion Community is comprised of 29 two-unit apartment buildings laid out specifically in a way to foster social interaction. Additionally, considering the area’s history for severe flooding, the development was constructed with several resilient features . Located on a formerly vacant lot that spans 6.4 acres, the Bastion Community is now a vibrant residential complex comprising 29 apartment buildings, each containing two units. Within the development, there are various one-, two- or three-bedroom options, ranging from 720 square feet to 1,200 square feet. Related: BIG completes low-income “Homes for All” project in Copenhagen Already known locally for creating modern but affordable housing complexes, the architects specifically designed the Bastion Community to be a “protected but inclusive and thriving live-work environment” for post-9/11 combat veterans and their families. The layout of the homes as well as the on-site community and wellness center were part of a strategy to create a strong sense of community for those who often feel isolated. The homes are uniform in their design, which includes pitched roofs, pale exterior tones and wooden fencing. All units were built to be adapted to be ADA accessible . Considering the location has a long history of flooding , resiliency was at the forefront of the design. All of the structures are elevated off the landscape via concrete piers to allow flood waters to flow freely under the buildings without causing harm. Additionally, landscaping and building strategies for filtering, storing and returning water to the soil were also incorporated into the design. In addition to their resiliency, the apartments were designed to be sustainable and durable for years to come. Tight insulation and high-performance HVAC equipment were used to cut energy costs, and there are tentative plans to install solar panels in the future. Each unit has high vaulted ceilings and operable windows to allow for natural air ventilation. + Office of Jonathan Tate Via Dezeen Photography by William Crocker and aerial photography by Jackson Hill

Continued here:
A vacant lot in New Orleans is converted into resilient and affordable housing for war veterans

Prym Fashion unveils eco-friendly clothing snaps made from plants and recycled bottles

July 1, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Prym Fashion unveils eco-friendly clothing snaps made from plants and recycled bottles

The fashion industry is well-known for wasteful practices in manufacturing, including excessive water consumption and chemical run-off. The fast fashion trend has lead to massive amounts of clothing waste that are not worthy of donating or recycling. In many cases, sourcing materials is a matter of finding what is cheap regardless of the effect on the planet. However, Prym Fashion takes materials seriously with a laser focus on every detail, right down to the snap on your favorite shirt. While we are seeing a trend toward incorporating more sustainable fabrics into clothing, the smaller details such as snaps can have just as large of a manufacturing and waste impact as larger fashion components. But sustainable materials can sometimes be difficult to find. The Prym Fashion L.I.F.E (Low Impact Fastener Ensemble)-certified snaps offer clothing manufacturers a solution to this problem. Related: This backpack is made from locally sourced cork and recycled materials “We understand that today’s consumers expect brands to offer products that are completely sustainable, including the fabric and the trim,” said Brian Moore, chief executive officer of Prym Fashion. “These eco-friendly snaps allow our customers to consider every detail and increase the overall sustainability of their products.” The snaps, available in EcoWhite or EcoGreen, offer earth-friendly solutions for sportswear, outdoor performance apparel and children’s and babies’ wear manufacturers. The EcoWhite snaps are made from recycled water bottles to eliminate the use of crude oil used in the production of virgin products, a process that also diverts single-use plastic from the waste stream. A single water bottle can produce 13 snaps. The EcoGreen snap is green in color but also green because it is sourced from plant materials, such as potato starch. As a result, this snap is both biodegradable and recyclable. An EcoBlue snap is on the horizon, which will source recycled ocean plastic for production. “As brands and retailers in the textile industry continue to raise their sustainability goals, details like trim will become increasingly important,” added Moore. “Prym Fashion is committed to making snaps that make a difference.” + Prym Fashion Images via Prym Fashion

See the original post here:
Prym Fashion unveils eco-friendly clothing snaps made from plants and recycled bottles

Palm Beach, Florida bans single-use plastic bags and polystyrene containers

July 1, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Palm Beach, Florida bans single-use plastic bags and polystyrene containers

Palm Beach, Florida has become the first town in Palm Beach County to officially ban single-use plastic bags and polystyrene containers (also known as Styrofoam containers). The ban on these items will go into effect on December 12, 2019 in order to allow businesses and vendors to use up their current inventory and start switching to more sustainable options. The town council voted to pass the ban in June and will enforce the regulations in restaurants, gas stations, drug stores and grocery stores. Private events and caterers will also have to abide by the restrictions. Town manager Kirk Blouin told the local paper, “The research has shown us these items are bad for the environment, particularly marine life , and it just makes sense to regulate it.” Related: Pacific Island Vanuatu is the first to ban disposable diapers Blouin also noted that although people are very dependent on these convenient plastic items, it is just out of habit and not necessity — and habits can change. “We are all creatures of habit,” he said. “Once we get used to a good habit, it becomes second nature to us.” Many local businesses were already on board with the measure and had ceased offering customers single-use bags as well as other items such as plastic straws and stirrers. Especially for a coastal town, these plastic items do not biodegrade and often end up on beaches and in the ocean, where they break down into microplastic particles. Microplastics are known to cause problems for marine life, and debris is unsightly on beaches. According to the Friends of Palm Beach, a clean-up group in the area, they have already cleared away 120,000 pounds of trash in their clean-ups since 2013. Over 75 percent of all trash collected from the beaches has been plastic waste that ends up in landfills or washes out to sea. Via The Hill and Palm Beach Post Image via Shutterstock

Excerpt from:
Palm Beach, Florida bans single-use plastic bags and polystyrene containers

Reclaimed NYC water towers are upcycled into a NEST playscape in Brooklyn

June 28, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Reclaimed NYC water towers are upcycled into a NEST playscape in Brooklyn

A giant NEST has landed on the roof of the Brooklyn Children’s Museum (BCM) — and it’s not for the birds. Brooklyn-based design and fabrication practice TRI-LOX created NEST, the museum’s new interactive playscape built out of reclaimed timber from the city’s rooftop water towers. Designed with parametric tools, the sustainable installation takes inspiration from the unique nests of the baya weaver birds — their nests are featured in the museum’s educational collection — and comprises an organic woven landscape with 1,800 square feet of space for open and creative play. Opened just in time for summer, the NEST playscape at the Brooklyn Children’s Museum (BCM) in Crown Heights caters to children ages 2 to 8. The woven wooden landscape is set on artificial turf and includes a climbable exterior and a series of ribbed tunnels and rooms that make up a permeable interior with entrances marked by bright blue paint. The reclaimed cedar slats not only make the structure easy to climb, but also partially obscure views for added playfulness. The top of the structure is crowned with a circular hammock area that directs views up toward the sky. “In exploring the museum’s educational collection, we came upon a series of incredible bird nests and let them inspire our design,” said ?Alexander Bender?, co-founder and managing partner of TRI-LOX, which was commissioned by BCM through a request for proposals in mid-2017. “One nest in particular, made by the baya weaver bird, offers an intricately woven form with rooms, tunnels and multiple entries. This concept was then transformed into a climbable playscape that retains the natural materiality of the nest and tells a story of an iconic design within our vertical urban habitat — the NYC rooftop wood water tower. We quite literally brought the water tower back to the rooftop with this project … it just had to be turned into a giant nest first.” Related: The Brooklyn Children’s Museum’s new green roof lets kids explore the wilderness in the middle of the city NEST playscape is the newest focal point for the BCM, which consists of a series of architecturally significant designs befitting its title as the world’s first children’s museum. Rafael Viñoly designed the museum’s eye-catching yellow building in 2008. Seven years later, Toshiko Mori added a pavilion on the 20,000-square-foot rooftop that was complemented with lush planting plan and a boardwalk by Future Green Studio in 2017. + TRI-LOX Photography by Arion Doerr via TRI-LOX

Read more:
Reclaimed NYC water towers are upcycled into a NEST playscape in Brooklyn

Hit the road in style this summer in this ship-inspired travel trailer

June 27, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Hit the road in style this summer in this ship-inspired travel trailer

Inspired to take a long summer adventure in a sweet tiny camper ? Well, French start-up Carapate has unveiled a 10.5-foot-long, boat-like travel trailer for adventurous souls to travel in style and comfort. Although compact, the interior space of the Carapate Travel Trailer is incredibly flexible with a modular bed/sofa combo, a sliding galley kitchen and an extra-wide swing door to take in panoramic views. According to the company, the design for the trailer was inspired by the beloved teardrop campers. Using the classic teardrop design as a starting point, the designers gave the camper a rounded trapezoid shape to create a bit more square footage. With traditional shipbuilding techniques, the team constructed the trailer to be incredibly lightweight. Coming in at approximately 990 pounds, the tiny trailer is easily towed by most vehicles and is extremely road-friendly. The nautical inspiration can also been seen in the camper’s exterior cladding, which includes wood, white and navy detailing. This sleek, yet classic feel continues throughout the interior. Related: These sweet teardrop trailers for adventurers run on solar power The entrance is through an oversized door that swings open and upward. This extra large doorway provides plenty of natural light to the interior as well as wide, unobstructed views of whatever incredible scenery may be surrounding the vehicle. Inside, white walls and wood detailing pay homage to boat interiors, as does the savvy storage solutions found throughout. The tiny camper comes equipped with a number of flexible furnishings that are meant to make the most out of minimal space. A modular bed layout includes three single mattresses that can be folded up into a sofa or fit together on the floor to create a sleeping area for two. The galley kitchen is also a smart, space-saving design. The concealed countertop slides out to reveal the basic amenities, including a single-burner stove, sink and a pull-out cutting board. The basic Carapate trailer package, which unfortunately is only available in Europe at the moment, starts at just under $16,000. However, the campers can also be customized with extra features including LED lighting, solar panels , an electric/gas fridge box and more. + Carapate Images via Carapate

Go here to read the rest:
Hit the road in style this summer in this ship-inspired travel trailer

Eco-friendly prefab social housing in France is built from wood and straw

June 27, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Eco-friendly prefab social housing in France is built from wood and straw

Earlier this year, the commune of Nogent-le-Rotrou in northern France gained a new social housing development that’s not only an inspiring example of beautiful affordable housing, but is also a model for eco-friendly architecture. Designed by Paris-based architectural firm NZI Architectes, the project comprises thirteen gable-roofed homes built from prefabricated timber wall components with straw insulation. Separated into three blocks, the houses are arranged in staggered rows and feature varying roof heights and finishes to create visual appeal. Spanning an area of 11,840 square feet, the homes in the social housing development were constructed in a factory off-site. Prefabricating the walls in a controlled warehouse environment not only minimized construction waste, but also helped save time and money. Since the panels were relatively lightweight, the construction team was able to forgo a heavy-duty crane and instead used light lifting equipment to assemble the homes. Related: Cambridge’s first co-housing development fosters sustainable living “By opting for the construction of wood & straw, biosourced construction is favored, which limits the use of unsustainable resources,” explain the architects, who also used straw for insulation due to the material’s durability and effectiveness. “The constructive advantage of wood and straw construction compared to the traditional wooden structure and MOB wood frame walls is the possibility of complete prefabrication of the wall. The low weight of the wooden structure and straw allows the production of large areas of factory walls.” The thirteen houses are grouped into three blocks—named Block A, Block B, and Block C—with four to five houses each. Blocks A and C are identical mirror images of one another while the central block B is slightly set back from the other two blocks. The houses in each block are arranged in staggered rows to create opportunities for green space. The minimalist , light-filled interiors embrace views of the green space with large windows and tall ceilings. + NZI Architectes Images © Juan Sepulveda Grazioli

Continued here: 
Eco-friendly prefab social housing in France is built from wood and straw

A modern home in South Korea is embedded into its environment via an expansive green roof

June 26, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A modern home in South Korea is embedded into its environment via an expansive green roof

Tucked into a rolling green hillside of Cheongdo-gun, South Korea, the Baomaru House by Busan-based firm Rieuldorang Atelier blurs the lines between nature and the man-made. Embedded into the sloped landscape, the home is split into two separate structures, which are connected by an expansive green roof that pulls double duty as a terrace for both sides of the home. Although the house is designed to blend into its surroundings, the unique design takes on a bold, modern appearance thanks to a series of gabled roofs that jut out of the landscape, creating a fun, pop-art effect. Once the residents and the architects found a building site for the home that was far from the hustle and bustle of city life, they were discouraged to learn that the back of the lot would soon be developed. As a solution, the architects decided to use the existing landscape to their advantage. Related: The Felderhof House in Italy is built into the ground and topped with a green roof “It is a general idea that the earth is a space that houses nature, and the house is a space that houses human beings,” the firm said. “In order to overturn this idea, we planned the earth as a space for human beings and the house as a space for nature. We did not want to design on the land … by cutting the ground or building up the soil. The point was to actively use the surrounding natural environment and land while complying with the slope of the land.” To work within the parameters of the natural topography, the architects decided to embed part of the 2,026-square-foot home into the landscape so that the structure would follow its contour. They also decided to split the structure into two parts, with one side housing the private bedrooms and kitchen and the other hosting the main living space. The two halves are split by a large entrance and underground garage, which is embedded completely into the hillside. Although the design was created to blend the structure into the natural surroundings, it takes a modern turn with a series of large white gabled roofs  that jut out of the green landscape. The bold modernity of the exterior continues throughout the interior living spaces. Double-height ceilings, white walls and light wood run through the home, enhanced by an abundance of natural light . With the bedrooms on one side, the main living room takes on a personality of its own. This structure mimics the same volume as the other but has a large cutout in the gabled roof, creating a brilliant open-air terrace that frames the views. On the bottom floor, the living space opens up to a large swimming pool that looks out over the mountains in the distance. + Rieuldorang Atelier Via Dwell Photography by Joonhwan Yoon via Rieuldorang Atelier

Original post:
A modern home in South Korea is embedded into its environment via an expansive green roof

Sustainably-sourced sunglasses built to last a lifetime rather than a season

June 26, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Sustainably-sourced sunglasses built to last a lifetime rather than a season

Living a sustainable lifestyle is about more than backyard composting and prolific use of Mason jars in lieu of plastic. To truly reach any level of sustainability we need to be aware of every purchase we make including how the product was made and even the packaging used. Although our conscientious purchasing decisions carry weight, corporate responsibility is where the real change will occur — enter Just Human. Just Human feels the burden of that responsibility and has decided to do something about it in the form of long-lasting, quality sunglasses built to last a lifetime, not a season. Related: These sustainable sunglasses smell like coffee and decompose into fertilizer The creation of the sunglasses released earlier this year began with four principals: Focus on the entire system of product creation, from materials to manufacturing to packaging. Streamline the design so that there are only a few products in production, each with a unisex design to serve as many people as possible. Combine function and fashion with a high-performing lens. Focus on durability for a product that won’t end up in the landfill anytime soon. Rather than relying on cheap synthetic materials that have become mainstream in the industry, Just Human sources material for the frames from softwood trees that are sustainably harvested and have earned FSC certification. The glass lenses are made from sand and minerals instead of petroleum-based plastic. Even the cutoffs from lens production are recycled and used for the next round of lens material. Pineapple leaf fibers (we’re hearing a lot about these lately!) and recycled water bottles make up the material for the case that house the sunglasses. The included cleaning cloth is produced using fabric made from 2.5 plastic water bottles . Carrying the eco-friendly idea through to the packaging, Just Human uses 100 percent post-consumer cardboard, eco-friendly inks and compostable tape made from wood pulp. Just Human understands that a focus on sustainability is a mute point if the product doesn’t meet the needs of the consumer so they’ve aimed to combine that focus with function and fashion. Incorporating sports technology into the lens allows them to filter out damaging UVs and glare while providing heat and scratch resistance. In the end, the goal is to provide a luxury product that will endure decades of use without impacting the planet . Wouldn’t it be nice if more companies adopted this simple philosophy? + Just Human Images via Just Human

Read the rest here: 
Sustainably-sourced sunglasses built to last a lifetime rather than a season

Nissan unveils a solar-powered, zero-emissions ice cream van

June 25, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Nissan unveils a solar-powered, zero-emissions ice cream van

To celebrate the U.K.’s Clean Air Day, Nissan has unveiled an impressive electric ice cream van that generates zero emissions while serving up a variety of cool and refreshing ice cream flavors on the go. The van is a fully electric vehicle installed with two Nissan Energy ROAM power packs and rooftop solar panels in order to power the van as well as the on-board equipment that helps keep the scrumptious ice cream nice and cold. There’s nothing like a cold ice cream cone to help cool off on a hot summer’s day. But the problem with most conventional ice cream trucks is that they still run on harmful diesel fuel. Additionally, many older truck models must keep the engines running to power the ice cream freezers, emitting harmful carbon dioxide emissions with each scoop, all day long. Related: Pizza Hut unveils a zero-emissions delivery truck that makes pizzas on the go Now, with its new design for a zero-emissions prototype, Nissan is hoping to revolutionize the mobile ice cream sector by providing an alternative for vendors looking to reduce their carbon footprint . Based on the e-NV200, Nissan’s 100 percent electric LCV model, the prototype was built using lithium-ion cells recovered from first-generation Nissan electric vehicles . The van’s motor runs on a 40kWh battery, while the ice cream equipment is powered by Nissan’s portable power pack, ROAM. To bring its dream of creating an entirely sustainable ice cream truck to fruition, Nissan partnered with Scottish ice cream maker, Mackie’s — a company that uses wind and solar power to make its delicious ice creams. As a result, not only is Nissan able to provide a better, more eco-friendly way of selling ice cream, but it is also able to provide a fully eco-friendly system, meaning that the ice cream is green from “sky to scoop.” + Nissan Images via Nissan

Read more: 
Nissan unveils a solar-powered, zero-emissions ice cream van

Ecokit offers innovative, eco-friendly, tech-rich housing in a box

June 25, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Ecokit offers innovative, eco-friendly, tech-rich housing in a box

A quick trip to IKEA can afford you multiple pieces of furniture you can load into your car and haul home to later be put together by simply following universal directions. With this idea of ease in mind, imagine being able to construct an entire house— now you can, thanks to Ecokit. Ecokit, the product of sisters Camilla and Pavla, is a house in a box— more or less. The manufacturing process involves each of the more than 4,000 parts to be designed and cut by a single-arm robot or programmed CNC machine. After manufacturing, the flat pieces are boxed and loaded into a shipping container that is then delivered to the desired site. Related: REPII House offers expansive modular space with sleek design elements With the goal of constructing houses anywhere that a shipping container can be delivered, Ecokits are a solution aimed at remote building sites. They can also be an option for temporary housing since they can be deconstructed after the initial build and most parts can be reused or recycled. The main goal: easy construction without the use of heavy equipment. “Ecokit will arrive in a container in the form of parts on pallets, from which you can construct a habitable unit with your own hands with a little effort in a short period of time. The final completion date depends on your aesthetic and energy demands. The assembly of our prototype two bedroom home lasted seven days,” recalls Camilla and her sister Pavla, who joined the business as the first house was built last year. “With all the accessories it can be fit out and habitable in about two months,” she adds. In addition to ease of construction and remote site location, the Ecokit provides a versatile, pre-fabricated, modular design for a variety of uses. Plus, it is ultra-efficient. The house has nearly three times the amount of insulation as a standard Australian home and allows for the installation of solar panels and batteries for off-grid living. There are also systems for rainwater collection, waste treatment, with additional options for maintenance-free, bushfire-proof and cyclone-proof adaptations. Technology options even include smart phone controlled home automation packages including ventilation, lighting, security, audio and more. But all this convenience doesn’t come at a sacrifice in comfort. High-quality timber windows, heated floors and upscale ventilation systems add to the livability of the home. Not to mention, finishes and treatments were chosen with little to no VOCs. Natural elements are used wherever possible for healthier air within the space. + ecokit Images via ecokit

Here is the original:
Ecokit offers innovative, eco-friendly, tech-rich housing in a box

« Previous PageNext Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1788 access attempts in the last 7 days.