Wright-inspired home has trees growing through the roof

April 12, 2021 by  
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Moscow-based firm Kerimov Architects has crafted a custom, luxury home for a new villa community in Repino, Leningrad that follows Frank Lloyd Wright’s philosophy of organic architecture by knitting the built environment into the natural landscape. Dubbed the House in Repino, the project, which is still in the design phase, will include nearly 11,000 square feet of living space and focus on minimizing the removal of existing trees. Created to complement a forested landscape, the house will feature a natural materials palette and allow some of the trees to grow through the roof. The conceptual project is proposed for a community in Repino, an area northwest of St. Petersburg on the edge of the Gulf of Finland with a forested environment. To keep the natural landscape intact as much as possible, the villa community has required that all residences be designed in the style of Frank Lloyd Wright, a stipulation that Kerimov Architects has let guide its design process.  Related: Former railway yard to receive a green transformation in St. Petersburg “The house is well integrated into the landscape, practically dissolving into it,” the firm explained. “We’ll try to preserve as many existing trees as possible; some of them will go through the canopies to create a unique rhythm and build a strong relationship between architecture and nature.” The expansive home will be built with a natural materials palette of stone, wood and metal that complements the local environment. The materials will also be encouraged to develop a patina to help blend the home into the landscape over time. To strengthen the connection with nature, the architects have emphasized indoor/outdoor living throughout with the creation of individual terraces for every room, from the primary bedroom and two children’s bedrooms to the spa with a swimming pool, hammam (a Turkish bath) and sauna. The house is organized around a central living space that serves as the “main square” from where all circulation passes through. The site will also include a guest block comprising two guest bedrooms along with a garage housing staff rooms and a workshop. + Kerimov Architects Images via Kerimov Architects

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Wright-inspired home has trees growing through the roof

Is the golf industry doing enough to combat climate change?

April 9, 2021 by  
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Is the golf industry doing enough to combat climate change? Aubrey McCormick Fri, 04/09/2021 – 02:00 Sports leagues are seeing the impacts and the surge of climate-responsible athletes using their platforms to promote positive environmental and social impact — it’s something for the history books. The golf industry, for one, is increasing its efforts to promote environmental sustainability and marketing to the general public its desire to embrace a more diverse demographic. Professional golfers have started speaking out about the changing climate, leading to some corporate sponsors rethinking strategies and how they can better align. For many professional athletes, it’s no longer enough to represent a brand without purpose. The same can be said for consumers. People want to engage with companies, brands and industries that represent their values. Over the last few years, the golf industry has made strides towards being more “sustainable,” but is it enough? According to the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, “climate change is real and human activities are the main cause.” The future is net-zero, and re-entering the Paris Climate Agreement should be seen as a signal to step up and act faster than ever before. Nearly every country in the world, including the U.S., has agreed to voluntarily lower their carbon emissions, report progress and implementation efforts to show transparency. In the U.S. alone, 2 million acres of land are used for golf courses. As the population grows, we may see more demand for this land to be used for agriculture, parks and real estate. The UN Sports for Climate Action Framework aims to unite the global sports community to combat climate change through “commitments and partnerships according to verified standards including measuring, reducing and reporting greenhouse gas emissions in line with the Paris Climate Agreement.” Currently, five golf organizations have joined: the United States Golf Association (USGA); Waste Management Phoenix Open; The International Golf Federation; World Minigolf Federation; and Sentosa Golf Club in Singapore. Golf is making strides both on social and environmental impact. Internationally, the Golf Environment Organization (GEO) uses its OnCourse program to help facilities, tournaments and golf course developments meet strict voluntary standards of sustainability. GEO’s influence is found around the world with partnerships spanning over 60 countries, including its new partnership with the Saudi Golf Federation, which is implementing GEO’s current sustainability strategy. New golf course developments in Asia, the Middle East and Africa are incorporating sustainability into the design and implementation phases of their projects. Particularly, Laguna L?ng Cô Golf Course and Resort in Vietnam has developed a regenerative model with a 17-acre rice field that runs throughout the property that yielded a 28-ton crop in 2020. As one of three golf courses in the world to be EarthCheck-certified , it is empowering employees to support the local community and protect the environment. In the U.S., the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America (GCSAA) just completed its three-year plan to establish Environmental Best Management Practices for all 50 states. In professional golf, several PGA Tour tournaments are leading the way to decrease their carbon footprints by becoming GEO-certified events. Led by the Waste Management Phoenix Open, the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am and the LPGA’s Dow Great Lakes Bay Invitational, these high-profile events are the PGA’s platform to broadly engage local communities and fans while assessing and reporting the true impact their tournaments have on local ecosystems. Nonprofit organizations such as the National Links Trust , recent bid winners to take over operations of Washington, D.C.’s three public golf courses, are dedicated to protecting affordable municipal golf courses, understanding the positive impact they have on local communities. Issues of diversity and inclusion in the game are garnering more attention as investments are made in supporting golf programs managed by historically Black colleges and universities. Of particular note are the establishment of Howard University’s men’s and women’s golf teams by Steph Curry and “Capital One’s The Match: Champions for Change,” an event featuring Charles Barkley and Phil Mickelson that raised $6.4 million . LPGA professional and two-time major champion Suzann Pettersen has emerged as a leading golf sustainability spokesperson, becoming the first professional golfer to openly endorse and partner with the GEO Foundation to establish new levels of awareness and action. Said Pettersen at the 2020 Dow Great Lakes Bay Invitational, “As a mother of a young child, it is incredible how concerned you become over the future of the planet, its biodiversity, air quality and climate. These things are absolutely vital to the health and wellbeing of future generations, so we all need to do our best to make things better.” According to the National Golf Foundation 2019 Industry Report , there are about 15,000 golf facilities and 24 million golfers. This is equivalent to around one in every nine Americans playing some form of golf. The industry has significant reach and an opportunity to lead by example and align to the world’s global emission goals. In the U.S. alone, 2 million acres of land are used for golf courses. As the population grows, we may see more demand for this land to be used for agriculture, parks and real estate. Subsequently, millennials and Gen Z individuals will become the majority of the population. As these generations mature, environmental transparency and carbon impact data, among many other sustainability-focused initiatives, will become the standard. So, what’s next? We have some ideas on how the golf industry can join the green sports movement and take action.  The Golf Channel should join the U.N. Sports for Climate Action Initiative. If the Golf Channel were to become the first major American sports broadcasting network to sign onto this framework, the move would be a signifier of the golf industry’s recognition of its environmental impact beyond golf course development and tournament operations and show leadership in sustainable broadcasting and messaging. We need more sustainability commitments from golf equipment manufacturers. Incredible amounts of money are spent every year on R&D as top golf equipment manufacturers compete for consumer dollars. Implementation of transparent, ethical and sustainable practices into their supply and value chains would increase accountability and responsible sourcing of inputs, report true emissions impact and expose gaps where current sustainable initiatives can increase efficiencies. If Amazon, Waste Management (and any other Fortune 500 company) can do it, then certainly the top manufacturers such as Titleist, TaylorMade and Ping Karsten Group can, too. The PGA of America should introduce a sustainability curriculum to its member certification process. With over 26,000 members around the globe, PGA golf professionals are the lifeblood of the golf industry and serve as the industry’s experts. Giving them the tools to redesign systems to be more sustainable, innovative and regenerative would generate significant ROI opportunities while adding value to the profession and meeting global emission reduction goals. We’d love to see broad implementation of sustainable operations across professional tournament golf. The select few professional golf tournaments that have committed to zero-waste and emission goals have provided a blueprint for how to conduct largescale tournaments in harmony with local communities. However, as the sponsorship dollars driving Corporate America’s investment into professional golf tournaments shift focus to include social and environmental accountability, will the managers and operators of golf tournaments be prepared to answer the call? A tremendous opportunity to activate climate action awareness campaigns awaits as fans and sponsors begin to return to the course to watch the game’s greats.  Federal legislation should help cities reinvest and retrofit existing municipal and public golf courses. In an effort to build back better, include city-owned golf facilities in any legislation that calls for grants, policies or loans that make them more accessible, inclusive and able to incorporate renewable systems. Investment in energy efficiency, water reclamation and irrigation systems, solar technology and alternative agricultural uses of unused space present golf courses as living laboratories for regenerative and circular urban ecosystems. Imagine if golf courses could grow enough food to feed an afterschool program or provide enough energy to power a homeless shelter. The time is now. Pull Quote In the U.S. alone, 2 million acres of land are used for golf courses. As the population grows, we may see more demand for this land to be used for agriculture, parks and real estate. Contributors Andrew Szunyog Topics Corporate Strategy Sports Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Shutterstock S. Wassana Close Authorship

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Is the golf industry doing enough to combat climate change?

Episode 263: Simulating transformation, investing in underserved communities

April 9, 2021 by  
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Episode 263: Simulating transformation, investing in underserved communities Heather Clancy Fri, 04/09/2021 – 01:30 Week in Review Stories discussed this week (5:05). An open letter to CPG companies on recycling Food companies must be healthy and sustainable, not one or the other From pioneers to fast-followers: Circular metrics are for the masses Features Learning through simulation (16:30) Last spring, GreenBiz teamed up with leadership development firm WholeWorks on the ” Leading the Sustainability Transformation ” professional certificate program, organized as a simulation exercise. GreenBiz Senior Vice President and Senior Analyst John Davies drops by with a progress report. Making community investments count (25:20) Catherine Berman is CEO of CNote , a woman-owned, woman-led organization focused on helping institutions invest in underserved communities. She offers insight into the model.  *Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere : “Curiosity,” “I’m Going for a Coffee,” “Here’s the Thing,” “Arcade Montage” and “Southside” Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episode of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes or Spotify . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Topics Podcast Corporate Strategy Social Justice Public-Private Partnerships Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 34:51 Sponsored Article Off

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Episode 263: Simulating transformation, investing in underserved communities

Students design skateboard wheels made from chewing gum

March 26, 2021 by  
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Chewing gum: it’s a type of plastic pollution that we’re just not talking about enough. Most modern chewing gums are made from synthetic plastic polymers that don’t break down or biodegrade. That means when you toss your used chewing gum on the sidewalk or stick it underneath a bench, you’re littering. Not only that, but chewing gum is commonly mistaken for food by wild animals (especially birds), causing them to choke or die. Two design students from the L’École de Design Nantes Atlantique in France are imagining ways to combat this silent pollution problem creatively. Hugo Maupetit and Vivian Fischer have created a concept that turns used chewing gum into skateboard wheels. Related: Sam Kaplan unwrapped 500 sticks of gum to create futuristic geometric structures They got the idea while brainstorming for a designed-focused way to tackle the gum pollution issue in urban areas. “We thought, why not take this characteristic waste of the city and use it to make it greener,” Maupetit and Fischer told Inhabitat. “The bold colors and texture of chewing gum is the perfect fit for use in skatewheels.” The idea is to bring the gum from the streets back to the streets in a sustainable way. The students envisioned a fictional partnership between Mentos, one of Europe’s biggest chewing gum producers, and Vans Europe, a popular manufacturer of skateboarding shoes and accessories. The students’ project proposes a line of vibrant skateboard wheels sold by Vans that uses old gum collected from the streets. How would they go about collecting the gum? According to the students, Mentos would install “gum boards” in urban areas to help spread the word and inspire passersby to stick their used gum to the signs instead of tossing it elsewhere. The gum would then be cleaned, molded with a stabilizing agent and stained with natural dye to form the base of the wheels. “Our initiative is supposed to clean the streets in a sustainable way. That is why we invented a system that will transform used wheels and turn them into new ones,” the students explained. “No more waste is created and the material stays in use.” + L’École de Design Nantes Atlantique Images via Hugo Maupetit and Vivian Fischer

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Students design skateboard wheels made from chewing gum

Sustainable White Flower Hall designed for school in India

March 25, 2021 by  
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Thanks to New Delhi -based interior decor and architecture firm Envisage, the Mann School in Alipur has a new girl’s hostel featuring sustainable elements like all-natural thermal insulation and solar panels. The White Flower Hall girls dormitory boasts all the creature comforts to build a haven for the school’s female students, helping to make them feel at home during their studies. The firm, started by partners Meena Murthy Kakkar and Vishal Kakkar, specializes in projects from the design process to the building process. The hostel overlooks a central  courtyard  and features dormitory doors that are positioned to face inward toward central corridors to promote socialization and interaction between students. Related: The Akshar Foundation is creating sustainable schools to teach children important life skills Envisage chose to incorporate the main campus color scheme of red and gray for the design of the dormitory, which is located between the executive block and the senior academic wing of the school. Common activity zones, such as the computer lab and game rooms, are located nearby in the basement surrounding the courtyard and the  school  amphitheater. The ground floor houses grades one to four with shared bunk beds for smaller children, while bedroom windows are positioned to provide outdoor views, ensuring an abundance of natural light and ventilation. The building’s facade features  brick  made using local kilns to reduce the project’s carbon footprint, and the terrace houses solar panels to keep electricity costs low. Built in a location known for its severe monsoon season, the central courtyard aligns to the northwest and southeast to catch winds during substantial rain downpours and create proper ventilation. In addition to using locally sourced brick in the building’s construction, the design also features the mud phuska method for  natural insulation . This method combines compacted soil with hay to reduce the ingress of heat by nearly 70%. The property also includes various green spaces via gardens and outdoor terraces to highlight the importance of nature among students. + Envisage Images via Envisage

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Sustainable White Flower Hall designed for school in India

This quarantine cabin made of hyper-local CLT was built in just 5 months

March 22, 2021 by  
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An eco-friendly architectural solution to quarantining during the pandemic has popped up in Barcelona’s Collserola park. A team of students and researchers from the Institute of Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IAAC) Valldaura Labs recently completed The Voxel, a solar-powered “quarantine” cabin built entirely of hyper-local structural CLT in just 5 months. The cabin accommodates a single occupant in a space that not only offers comfortable self-confinement but also showcases the potential of a circular bio-economy in construction. The Voxel, short for volumetric pixel, was designed and built from April to August 2020 as part of the IAAC’s immersive Master in Advanced Ecological Buildings and Bio-cities (MAEBB) program. A team of 17 students and five volunteers from 15 countries built the cabin using 40 Aleppo Pine trees felled within a radius of less than a kilometer from the construction site and processed at the nearby Valldaura Labs carpentry facility. The hundreds of resulting pine lamellas were individually catalogued to allow for accurate tracing back to the original source tree before they were pressed into over 30 CLT panels used for the cabin’s 12-square-meter structure. Related: Prefab Danish home was built from CLT and weathered steel in just 3 days Instead of metal connections, the design team used lap joints and wooden dowels to fasten together the CLT panels to further reduce the project’s carbon footprint. A layer of cork insulation is sandwiched between the structural frame and rain-screen panels made from waste material produced during the CLT production process. The exterior panels were also charred with the Japanese shou sugi ban technique for increased durability. “These off-cuts were turned into a facade that showcases the organic complexity of the tree that is usually hidden in most wooden constructions,” the design team said.  The “quarantine” cabin is equipped with three solar panels, independent battery storage as well as a sustainable water system that collects rainwater, recycles gray water and treats black water within a self-contained biogas system. + IAAC Valldaura Labs Photography by Adria? Goula via IAAC Valldaura Labs

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This quarantine cabin made of hyper-local CLT was built in just 5 months

Recycled plastic wireless chargers work twice as fast as regular cables

March 18, 2021 by  
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U.K.-based Gomi first entered the design realm when it released the world’s first portable Bluetooth speaker made from plastic waste in 2018. The company sources its raw materials from plastic that would otherwise be sent to landfills or be incinerated, working alongside small businesses, global corporations and recycling plants. Now, Gomi is introducing a new product — wireless chargers made from recycled plastic waste. With its portable speaker, Gomi took troublesome items such as single-use plastic bags and bubble wrap, using the natural color variation between materials to create a marbled pattern that was unique to each device. Shortly after, the company released a portable charger handmade from plastic waste that used reclaimed batteries from old electronics (such as damaged electric scooters and bikes). Related: Gomi portable chargers repurpose plastic waste and batteries The Gomi wireless chargers take the same sustainable style a step further with 15W fast-charging capabilities that are twice as fast as regular lightning cables. The chargers combine a polished, laser-engraved aluminum plate with 100% recycled plastic waste that would otherwise go to landfill. Compatible with all wireless charging-enabled devices, these chargers even work with the newest Apple iPhone 12 model’s Magsafe charging technology. Simply plug the charger into any USB-C wall plug, and it will magnetically attach onto the back of the phone. If your phone doesn’t have magnetic charging abilities but still has wireless charging capabilities, it still works. At just under $50 (£35), it just doesn’t get any better than that. Like all of Gomi’s products, the handmade Wireless Mag Chargers come with an automatic lifetime warranty that helps keep them out of landfills. Gomi promises lifetime repairs and also offers buy-back credits for devices at the end of their lives, so that the company can recycle components into a newer generation of products. According to Gomi, the chargers are being released in limited quantities and are only available online through its website. + Gomi Design Images via Gomi Design

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Recycled plastic wireless chargers work twice as fast as regular cables

Award-winning, 3D-printed smart lamp references Arabian wind catchers

March 10, 2021 by  
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Last year, designer Muhammad Khalid of Khawarizm Studio unveiled ‘The Future Catcher,’ a sculptural, 3D-printed smart lamp that placed third in the 2020 3D Printed Luminaire Design Competition, an event hosted by Huda Lighting in partnership with Immensa Additive Manufacturing to boost awareness of 3D printing technology in lighting and interior design industries. The innovative prototype celebrates the designer’s cultural heritage with a form inspired by famous wind catchers in Arabian architecture. The Future Catcher light fixture — also called Lou’Lou’ after the Arabic word for “pearls” — was exhibited at Dubai Design Week 2020 hosted by Colab space. Launched in March 2020, the 3D Printed Luminaire Design Competition not only gave designers across the MENA region a platform to showcase bespoke lighting products, but it also bolstered the UAE’s reputation as a hub for innovation in 3D printing. The shortlisted projects, picked by a multidisciplinary panel of experts, were 3D-printed by Immensa Additive Manufacturing Labs and exhibited at the Huda Lighting Dubai Showroom. Related: 3D-printed concrete “forest” pavilion proposed for Dubai’s Expo 2020 The four winning designs all feature dynamic and organically inspired forms, from first place winner Chirag Rangholia’s root-like ‘Chrysaora’ pendant lamp to Alaa Shibly’s angular fixture that’s aptly named ‘Bat’s Movement Biomimicry’; Shibly’s design tied with Khawarizm Studio’s entry for third place in the competition. The Future Catcher/Lou’Lou’ smart lamp is based on IoT (internet of things) technology and integrates sensors to respond to user commands for different lighting modes and colors.  “Our concept is to develop our cultural heritage in a futuristic design process,” Khawarizm Studio explained. “The form is influenced by famous wind catchers in our Arab world culture with parametric organic growth from the Voronoi 3D fractals to represent our love for Arabic heritage and organic growing patterns. As we are living in the age of fluidity in Zygmont Baumann’s philosophical approach; we decided to enhance fluidity in the Voronoi pattern, using just one algorithm for endless variations that represents the current hegelian Zeitgeist.” + 3D Printed Luminaire Design Competition Images via Khawarizm Studio

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Award-winning, 3D-printed smart lamp references Arabian wind catchers

This Indonesian high-rise performs 36% better than LEED baseline

March 5, 2021 by  
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Located in Jakarta’s central business district of Sudirman, Sequis Tower makes a space for itself on the city skyline. Drawing inspiration from the Banyan tree for both design influence and metaphoric meaning, the tower is meant to look like it’s rising organically from the ground. Sequis Tower encompasses roughly 1.5 million square feet and 40 floors. This includes spaces for offices , healthcare facilities, shops and restaurants. The innovative design uses a series of landscaped terraces composed of four bundled super-tubes. While this certainly makes the tower eye-catching, it also creates a range of different floorplates. This makes the building extremely structurally sound, which is essential considering the tower’s location in an active seismic zone. Related: Seismically-safe cave home in Spain replaces informal shelter for shepherds While the tower wall is designed to provide beautiful views of the surrounding world, it also reduces solar heat gain , which helps keep cooling costs down. Other sustainable elements have also been integrated into the design, such as high-efficiency building systems. Additionally, using locally-sourced and recycled building materials helped reduce the tower’s embedded energy, while also staying true to the building’s central theme of rising from the landscape like an organic structure. On the ground level, the tower includes spaces for pedestrians. The building’s parking area is elevated, so the ground floor remains open for green areas and walkways. The design includes an elevated park , too. KPF, Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, received two major awards for Sequis Tower, starting with a design award recognizing the tower’s human-focused, efficient design. The second is a sustainability award, proving that good design and sustainability can go hand-in-hand. The building also won a slew of additional awards, including Best Green Development and Best Office. Sequis Tower is also one of the first LEED Platinum buildings in all of Indonesia. In fact, it performs 36% better than the LEED baseline. + KPF Images via Mario Wilbowo Photography

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Mask Architects designs a cavernous luxury villa in Sardinia

March 4, 2021 by  
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European design firm Mask Architects has shared renderings of a proposed luxury villa that resembles a white, seaside café. Informed by local Sardinian architecture and digital modeling software, the project — dubbed the Villa G01 “Rock and Cave” special — has been proposed for one of the most exclusive areas of Northern Sardinia and celebrates indoor/outdoor living with a massive garden, spacious terraces and openings that offer panoramic views of the sea. Mask Architects’ Villa G01 is a new interpretation of the sculptural buildings designed by Jacques Couëlle, a self-taught French architect who was nicknamed “the architect of billionaires” after his luxurious and fanciful designs made from carved concrete. Like Antoni Gaudí , Couëlle followed a style of organic architecture that emphasizes a relationship with nature. Mask Architects seeks to build on Couëlle’s legacy in Sardinia by using modern computer modeling and robotic construction to achieve Villa G01’s sculptural and organic design. Related: Amazing dragon-inspired cliff house in Spain uses the Earth to stay cool The home’s curved concrete exterior shell evokes imagery of Sardinian rocks. Inspired by the natural voids created in these rocks through the process of erosion, the exterior curves inward to create sheltered outdoor terraces. The connection to nature is strengthened by the villa’s placement in a large garden landscaped with native trees, plants and stones. The outdoor area also includes an infinity pool that the architects say can be constructed from prefabricated , high-density polyurethane blocks using KUKA robotics milling. It would then be installed onsite with a special steel structure and a varnish of gelcoat. The conceptual seafront villa comprises five bedrooms with stunning views as well as a spacious living area that connects seamlessly to the outdoors via folding glass walls. An outdoor kitchen with a dining table, outdoor cinema and a sunbathing and multipurpose area arranged around the pool extend the footprint of the 4,000-square-meter home. + Mask Architects Images by Derya Genc / Genc Design Studio via Mask Architects

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Mask Architects designs a cavernous luxury villa in Sardinia

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