‘Hovering’ gardens passively cool this energy-efficient home

May 19, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Indian design firm Niraj Doshi Design Consultancy has unveiled a stunning home in Pune, India that proves that greenery is much more than just decoration. Built for a large family of six, the Hovering Gardens House is an exquisite example of how combining natural materials, such as rocks and plants, can result in a contemporary, energy-efficient home  that sits in harmony with nature. The three-story home has plenty of indoor and outdoor space. The main volume is an H-shaped structure with a massive central courtyard , all surrounded by a barrier wall made of natural rock. Related: This café in Vietnam is a modern-day Hanging Gardens of Babylon Keeping India’s hot and humid climate in mind, the architects designed the house with several passive features , such as the cantilevered balconies that “hover” over the spaces below. These balconies are covered in hanging vegetation to further protect the interiors from harsh sunlight. Additionally, the house was installed with several vertical screen facades, which provide the family with privacy while also permitting sun and air to filter through the main living areas. For additional cooling, the family can use a state-of-the-art indirect evaporative cooling system that reduces reliance on conventional, energy-intensive air conditioners. Throughout the interior, triple-height ceilings, white walls and massive panels of glass add to the home’s contemporary style. The large residence was arranged to accommodate the family of six currently, but it is also designed to be flexible for the family’s future needs when the youngest children leave the nest. Each wing has a distinctive use but can be converted into separate living areas in the future. The designers also focused on using natural materials to create a strong connection to the surroundings. From interior rock walls to water features, plus bridges that join several pocket gardens, the Hovering Gardens House has an incredibly soothing atmosphere. + Niraj Doshi Design Consultancy Via ArchDaily Images via Niraj Doshi Design Consultancy

View post:
‘Hovering’ gardens passively cool this energy-efficient home

CX Landscape proposes futuristic coastal park in response to climate change

May 19, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Australia-based CX Landscape has unveiled designs for Sea Line Park, a conceptual project to link the eastern and western inner suburbs of Melbourne with a linear coastal park. Designed to serve as a new line of defense against rising waters, the Sea Line Park would comprise three islands, two pontoon bridges and undersea roads to provide a new direct connection between Williams Town to the west and Elwood in the east. The fantastical proposal would also draw power from renewable sources, including tidal and solar power. Bookended by two movable pontoon bridges, the Sea Line Park consists of three curvaceous green islands : two “Sports Islands” flanking a central “Art Island”. The Sports Islands would function as public outdoor recreation space for both active and passive programs. The Art Island serves primarily as an events space and would be home to a large north-facing meadow that can host open cinemas, performances, markets and other events. A naturalistic landscape with pedestrian and cyclist paths would be integrated onto all islands. Related: Olson Kundig solar sail proposal could power up to 200 Melbourne homes with clean energy The linear parks would also house a live seed bank within a series of pods, the design of which is inspired by the diamond-patterned totem polls of the Wurundjeri tribe. Solar panels would cover the exterior of each pod and — along with the tidal power generation units integrated in the two pontoon bridges — provide energy for the entire park. The islands are also punctuated by bubble-like structures that house seawater purification and freshwater storage systems. To address ocean waste, the designers have proposed using submarine robots to collect plastic ocean debris and repurposing the waste as raw material for 3D printing construction materials. “This park will grow, adapt and innovate with the help of cutting-edge technologies, to be resilient and resistant to natural disasters and climate change ,” the designers said. “A self-sustained living hub is suitable for any coastal cities around the world, which can carry the critical resources and civilizations to create a mobile global village.” + CX Landscape Images via CX Landscape

Here is the original post:
CX Landscape proposes futuristic coastal park in response to climate change

Rebuilding recycling to go circular

May 19, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Rebuilding recycling to go circular Keefe Harrison Mon, 05/18/2020 – 18:18 This article is part of our Paradigm Shift series, produced by nonprofit PYXERA Global, on the diverse solutions driving the transition to a circular economy. See the full collection of stories and upcoming webinars with the authors  here . After the coronavirus pandemic has passed, the world will need solutions to repair our economy in a way that protects both the planet and its people. The circular economy is a solution for our future health and wellness and recycling has a vital role to play. A circular economy is not possible without recycling, yet it can’t happen through recycling alone. As companies ramp up their circular economy goals, they’re often based on the concept that recycling will be the workhorse and catch-net of a bigger system. The truth is, that system is not yet a reality. Recycling isn’t just a thing you do when you’re done drinking your bottle of water or reading the morning paper. It’s a system supported by hundreds of thousands of employees, generating billions of dollars in economic activity, and conserving precious natural resources. However, while it can feel as though it’s a singular service, in fact it represents a loosely connected, highly interdependent network of public and private interests. The U.S. census tells us there are about 20,000 local governments, each independently responsible for deciding what to recycle, how to recycle, or whether to offer recycling services at all. This collection of disaggregated waste management decisions is a challenging start of the “reverse supply chain” that is recycling. The Recycling Partnership’s 2020 State of U.S. Curbside Recycling Report addresses a system that is causing some communities to abandon their programs, but also shows an overwhelming majority of communities across the country still committed to providing household recycling services. Americans continue to value and demand recycling as an essential public service according to The Recycling Partnership’s 2019 Earth Day survey. A circular economy is not possible without recycling, yet it can’t happen through recycling alone. The time to transform the way we think about and manage waste is now. Conceptually, recycling is and has been the “gateway” for a circular economy worldview to take hold in our society. In this transition, it’s critically important to seize on the cultural momentum that recycling has inspired, because behavior change takes so much longer than many other solvable challenges in the transition from linear to circular. Citizens can feel disheartened by the realization that our efforts to recycle are often in vain. Consider the following statistics: More than 20 million tons of curbside recyclable materials are sent to landfills annually Curbside recycling in the United States currently recovers only 32 percent of available recyclables in single-family homes If the remaining 20 million tons were recycled, it would generate 370,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) jobs It also would reduce U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by 96 million metric tons of CO2  equivalent AND conserve an annual energy equivalent of 154 million barrels of oil OR the equivalent of taking more than 20 million cars off U.S. highways While recycling feels universal, only half of the American population has access to curbside recycling . Before we can implore a public to recycle, they need to be guaranteed the ability to do so. Many communities increasingly pay more to recycle , sometimes double the cost of landfilling  — and many more programs lack critical operating funds. Policy can and should help community recycling programs to improve by addressing challenging market conditions, providing substantial funding support and resolving cheap landfill tipping fees that make disposal options significantly less expensive than recycling. A truly circular economy — one that takes us off the perilous take-make-waste path — can’t be built on the shaky foundation of the current U.S. recycling system just described. It needs to be shored up, supported, rebuilt and reinvigorated. Most important, it cannot work properly without the aligned efforts from all members of industrial supply chains. Recycling is not just something that citizens do to feel good about buying something — it also provides a circular manufacturing feedstock that displaces newly extracted materials. It is needed by manufacturing to make new products, reduce environmental impact and achieve a more positive economic result. This is true for mature industries such as paper mills and aluminum smelters and for developing end markets such as chemical recycling. The fate of current and not-yet-recyclable materials rests in the hands of a broad set of private sector actors who must adapt to support the transition. Strong, coordinated action is needed in areas including package design and labeling, capital investments, scaled adoption of best management practices, policy interventions, and consumer engagement. The fate of current and not-yet-recyclable materials rests in the hands of a broad set of private sector actors who must adapt to support the transition. A three-step plan to ensure recycling supports the circular economy 1. Support for local recycling programs with policies and capital Local political support for recycling needs to be strengthened, such that municipalities are meeting the expectations of most Americans: recycling bins alongside trash cans, the contents of which are being recycled. All this needs to be supported at the federal level with policies that incentivize adoption and reduce confusion around recycling. It also means continued innovation in the collection, sorting and general recyclability of materials, including the building of flexibility and resiliency to add new materials into the system. 2. Significant investment in domestic infrastructure and end markets An extensive series of targeted investments is needed to deliver a deeper integration of circular manufacturing feedstock into the supply chain. This will help provide the carts to collect the recyclables, the trucks to pick them up and the facilities to sort it all out. There also needs to be a deepened commitment to support both existing end markets such as cardboard, bottles and cans, and new end markets, such as chemical recycling, to keep more packaging and materials in the economy and more molecules in motion. As published in The Recycling Partnership’s 2019 Bridge to Circularity Report, $250 million over the next five years could launch an innovation fund to design and implement the recycling system of the future using advanced technology, building more robust data systems and enhancing consumer participation. 3. Broad stakeholder engagement We need more than the involvement of dozens of the biggest companies in the world. When you go to the store, it is not a monolithic experience. We don’t buy all our stuff from one brand, one company or one packaging material. Those leading companies shouldn’t be the only ones taking part in this transition. Every aspect of the recycling system that feeds into the circular economy needs to be involved — from the design of the materials on store shelves for efficient recovery and recyclability to the community, infrastructure and end market components mentioned in the previous two steps. It’s clear that unless stakeholders from across the value chain align and conform to the circular economy, we will not be able to drive the change necessary to move recycling in the United States to that place where no more waste is going to the landfill. It will take bold public-private partnerships and leadership to make lasting improvements. Recycling cannot solve for the circular economy, but the circular economy could solve recycling. Now is the time for action. To learn more from the leaders of the circular economy transition, visit  PYXERA Global . Pull Quote A circular economy is not possible without recycling, yet it can’t happen through recycling alone. The fate of current and not-yet-recyclable materials rests in the hands of a broad set of private sector actors who must adapt to support the transition. Contributors Dylan de Thomas Topics Circular Economy Recycling Paradigm Shift Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Shutterstock franz12 Close Authorship

Originally posted here:
Rebuilding recycling to go circular

This green wall uses upcycled clay tiles for natural cooling

May 15, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on This green wall uses upcycled clay tiles for natural cooling

In its latest project to creatively repurpose clay roof tiles, Indian architecture firm Manoj Patel Design Studio has upcycled locally produced tiles into a green wall with natural cooling benefits. Dubbed the Ridge Clay Roof Tile Plantation, the project was created to promote the use of locally produced clay products. It also serves as a reaction against the proliferation of plastic and metal planters that have increasingly replaced clay pots. The Ridge Clay Roof Tile Plantation was installed on the shaded outdoor terrace of a residence in Vadodara, a Gujarati city with an extremely hot climate and temperatures that regularly near or exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Manoj Patel Design Studio created the green wall with repurposed kiln-fired clay roof tiles to help promote natural cooling, stimulate the local economy and to bring a touch of nature to the urban apartment. Artificial turf has also been laid on the terrace. Related: 3D-printed home inspired by a wasp’s nest is made of local clay “Such creative clay roof tile plantations are best suited to hot climatic considerations as clay surface absorbs water from the plants and when air comes in contact with the surface, it releases cool air into the space which also provides close to nature experience to the viewers,” the architects explained. “The use of clay tiles serves the purpose of plantation with environment sensitive transformation providing expression of everlasting beauty in less space.” Produced by local craftsmen, the V-shaped clay tiles are slightly modified with the addition of little grooves to help the tiles bond together. Attached to the wall with cement, the textural wall is assembled by hand and comprises tiles arranged in a zigzag pattern. The “pockets” created by two V-shaped tiles placed opposite one another are used to hold plants and lights or can be sealed off to create a small surface for placing objects. + Manoj Patel Design Studio Images via Manoj Patel Design Studio

Read more from the original source: 
This green wall uses upcycled clay tiles for natural cooling

COVID-19, 3D printing and the digital supply chain reckoning

May 14, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on COVID-19, 3D printing and the digital supply chain reckoning

COVID-19, 3D printing and the digital supply chain reckoning Heather Clancy Thu, 05/14/2020 – 03:28 Proponents of 3D printing technology and digital manufacturing solutions have been seeking their breakthrough moment for years. It took mere weeks to showcase their potential as enablers of flexible supply chains — capable of decentralizing worldwide production and responding to violent, unforeseen disruption. Every day, there is news of some inspirational pivot that points toward the future possibilities for creating far more sustainable supply chains. The most vivid illustration, of course, is the literally hundreds of companies diverting at least some portion of their production capacity to creating urgently needed supplies for the medical community. It’s part altruism, part capitalism. Just a few examples: 3D printing provider HP Inc. and its network of customers and partners has so far “printed” more than 1.5 million parts for front-line healthcare workers — components for face shields and PAPR hoods. Digital manufacturing specialist Fictiv has mobilized its network to produce batches of 10,000 shields daily with lead times of as little as 24 hours.  Another player, Carbon , teamed up with Resolution Medical and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston to design and start producing nasopharyngeal swabs for COVID-19 in just three weeks. The partnership is producing hundreds of thousands of swabs every week using Carbon’s M2 printers. Markforged , which makes metal and carbon fiber 3D printers, is part of a similar collaboration driven by several hospitals and research institutions in San Diego. With supply chains experiencing such significant disruption right now, we could see trends in different sectors toward decentralization and localization … “With supply chains experiencing such significant disruption right now, we could see trends in different sectors toward decentralization and localization, including in the way products are designed and made to rely less on centralized production and mass production,” noted Carbon CEO Ellen Kullman, in response to questions I sent her for this article. A similar sentiment was shared by Ramon Pastor, interim president of 3D printing and digital manufacturing at HP, also via email: “Many companies look to digital manufacturing service providers to help speed development of new products, shorten time to market, create leaner supply chains and reduce their carbon footprint.” The global 3D printing market was worth about $12 billion in 2019, with a compound annual growth rate of 14 percent predicted from 2020 to 2027. One of HP’s high-profile customers is Volkswagen, which is using its technology in the design of electric vehicles. VW aims to produce more than 22 million EVs worldwide by 2028. The pandemic is proving to be what Sean Manzanares, senior manager of business strategy and marketing for Autodesk, describes as an “unfortunate catalyst” that is accelerating corporate evaluations of alternative, more sustainable production methods. (To sate that interest, the software company is offering free access to the commercial versions of its cloud-hosted design applications through June 30.) Autodesk is putting considerable muscle behind demonstrative facilities that help companies explore the potential of 3D printing and localized manufacturing, such as the Generative Design Field Lab that is part of the 100,000-square-foot MxD innovation center in Chicago. Autodesk doesn’t make the hardware; it has added artificial intelligence to many of its applications to make “push-button” manufacturing simpler. One company exploring how these technologies could support its sustainability initiatives is IKEA, which has been examining how it might use reclaimed furniture scraps to create new products that combine wood and an emerging form of “sustainable power” from Arkema, which makes resins for 3D printers, Manzanares said. The first thing you have to do is show people that they have options. Dave Evans, founder and CEO of Fictiv and a former Ford engineer, said the pandemic has helped underscore the notion that digital manufacturing networks — ones that allow organizations to be more agile when it comes to sourcing — will be key to ensuring resilience in the long term, as disruptions brought on by climate change become more frequent. The seven-year-old company just logged its best first quarter. One ongoing dialogue within Fictiv is the role of design in moving toward a more circular, agile economy — one in which products can be repaired and serviced far more easily. The company’s gift to employees last Christmas: the 2002 book ” Cradle to Cradle ,” which it hopes will spur innovation from the bottom up. “The first thing you have to do is show people that they have options,” Evans observed. “If you can show someone a [total cost of ownership] or landed cost, you can show them the emissions of hyperlocal versus some different view. Our role isn’t to push sustainability, but it’s to give them a better choice. If you can do that, you’re enabling leaders to make both better business decisions and better environmental decisions.” This article first appeared in GreenBiz’s weekly newsletter, VERGE Weekly, running Wednesdays. Subscribe  here . Follow me on Twitter:@greentechlady. Pull Quote With supply chains experiencing such significant disruption right now, we could see trends in different sectors toward decentralization and localization … The first thing you have to do is show people that they have options. Topics COVID-19 Supply Chain Innovation Technology 3D Printing Featured Column Practical Magic Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off A piece of manufacturing machine from Fictiv’s digitally connected network. Fictiv Close Authorship

Here is the original post:
COVID-19, 3D printing and the digital supply chain reckoning

Whimsical, off-grid earthship is made out of reclaimed tires and bottles

May 13, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Whimsical, off-grid earthship is made out of reclaimed tires and bottles

It’s not everyday that you get to stay in an earthship, but if you’re able to travel to Ironbank, South Australia in the future, make sure to check out the amazing Earthship Ironbank . Made out of reclaimed tires that were pounded into a curved shape, this unique, off-grid Airbnb property is located on about four acres of native bush land and surrounded by native wildlife. The beautiful property, which is the first council-approved earthship in Australia, is made out of various reclaimed materials , such as discarded tires and old glass bottles, and is completely self-sufficient. Created by Martin and Zoe Freney, the design was inspired by the work of Michael Reynolds, who is known for starting the earthship movement years ago. Related: Couple builds an ‘Earthship’ tiny home for less than $10K With the help of about 60 volunteers, Earthship Ironbank took shape using, by definition, many reclaimed materials. To start, the frame of the 750-square-foot structure was built primarily from stacked discarded tires. Filled with earth and coated in cement, the tires were pounded into a curved shape. From there, Martin created a strategy to take the earthship off of the grid . According to Martin, a tight thermal shell was key in reducing the need for high-tech energy and water systems. The residence relies primarily on solar power . There is also a solar hot water system. Various windows and skylights allow for natural light and air ventilation, which further reduces the need for electricity. The south side of the structure is tucked into the ground to add thermal mass. This earth-bermed section is covered with natural plantings and gravel for optimal thermal stability. Another bonus to embedding the house into the landscape is the added resilience to bushfires. An expansive rooftop conceals the home’s integral gray water system, which includes various filters that lead to underground water tanks. The off-grid home has a gorgeous design, too. A path made of natural stones leads to an arched doorway with ornate patterns of colorful glass bottles. Inside, a warm hallway leads to the greenhouse , which was planted with lush banana trees as well as other edible plants. The garden is irrigated through the built-in graywater system. The unique Airbnb accommodation has one bedroom for up to two guests, who can enjoy a lovely round lounge area with an open kitchen. The kitchen is equipped with standard amenities, including a wood-burning stove. When they aren’t taking it easy inside the tranquil earthship, guests can enjoy wandering around the grounds, exploring the local landscape and observing wildlife. For anyone interested in spending time in this lovely earthship, check out its availability by visiting its Airbnb posting . + Earthship Ironbank Via Tiny House Talk Photography by James Field via Earthship Ironbank

Read more:
Whimsical, off-grid earthship is made out of reclaimed tires and bottles

Spains first Passivhaus nursing home generates surplus energy

May 13, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Spains first Passivhaus nursing home generates surplus energy

Madrid-based design studio CSO Arquitectura has completed Spain’s first Passivhaus-certified nursing home in Camarzana de Tera. Built as an expansion of the nursing home that the firm had completed in 2005, the new addition provides additional bedrooms and stronger connections with the outdoors. The new, airtight building is also equipped with solar panels to power both the old and new buildings. Conceived as an “energy machine”, the new nursing home extension boasts a minimal energy footprint thanks to its airtight envelope constructed from a prefabricated wooden framework system. The prefabricated components were made in a Barcelona workshop and were then transported via trucks to the site, where they were assembled in one week. This process reduced costs and construction time and has environmentally friendly benefits that include waste reduction. Related: Spanish elderly care center wrapped in a pixelated green facade The new construction is semi-buried and comprises three south-facing “programmatic bands” linked by a long corridor. The first “band” houses the daytime services and a north-facing greenhouse with planting beds for the residents. The two remaining sections consist of the bedrooms, each of which opens up to an individual terrace and shares access to a communal patio. Exposed wood, large windows and framed views of nature were key in creating a welcoming sense of home — a distinguishing feature that the architects targeted as a contrast to the stereotypical cold feel of institutions and hospitals. The new nursing home extension is topped with an 18 kW photovoltaic array along with 20 solar thermal panels and rooftop seating. When combined with the building’s airtight envelope, which was engineered to follow passive solar strategies, the renewable energy systems are capable of producing surplus energy, which is diverted to the old building. The Passivhaus-certified extension also includes triple glazed openings, radiant floors, rainwater harvesting and mechanical ventilation equipped with heat recovery.  + CSO Arquitectura Photography by David Frutos via CSO Arquitectura

See the original post here: 
Spains first Passivhaus nursing home generates surplus energy

1973 Airstream is an ‘easy-breezy’ off-grid home with a fold-out deck

May 12, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on 1973 Airstream is an ‘easy-breezy’ off-grid home with a fold-out deck

Design-build firm Innovative Spaces worked with a client to bring her tiny-home-on-wheels dream to fruition by renovating a 1973 Airstream Tradewind into the Alice Airstream — a gorgeous, modern home complete with off-grid capabilities and a deck. When tasked by an adventurous client to create a new home on wheels for herself and her dog and cat, the Innovative Spaces team went to work searching for the perfect abode. Not only did the home have to be mobile, but it had to be off-grid ready as well. When the designers found a 1973 Airstream Tradewind, they knew they had the perfect trailer to get started. Related: Artist revamps dingy interior of a 1962 Airstream with vibrant florals Innovative Spaces owner Nate Stover explained that although the Airstream trailer was in fairly poor shape, they knew they had found a diamond in the rough. “The condition of these vintage trailers rarely matters for our projects, as we replace just about everything on the interior and often also do quite a bit of customization on the exterior” Stover said. “It was your typical 1970s trailer — pretty funky inside after years of sitting around.” Alas, the classic trailer was about to receive a very modern-day makeover at the hands of the creative design team. Although the exterior was in good shape, only requiring a cleanup and new coat of a Sprinter Blue Grey paint, the interior needed to be completely gutted. The first step was to lift the shell off of the chassis to ensure that the home had a solid foundation. To do so, they had to rebuild a new chassis out of aluminum, which was chosen specifically to give the trailer a durable shell. Next up, a new subfloor system comprised of gray and black water tanks, wiring and plumbing and fiberboard was installed, followed by spray foam insulation. The final and most exciting step was implementing the new interior design . The client had requested an open-concept space that included a decent cook’s kitchen and a spa-like bathroom. From there, Innovative Spaces added deep shades of blue to complement the white walls and natural tones throughout the interior. Most of the furnishings within the 165-square-foot home were designed to provide optimal comfort and functionality. The enviable kitchen includes modern appliances as well as a small dining nook at the entrance. The sofa doubles as a bed while an opaque, flower-printed privacy wall leads to the luxurious bathroom. Of course, the design also makes plenty of space for the cat and dog with custom, built-in pet beds. Although the trailer’s interior is definitely compact, the savvy layout and fresh design scheme makes the space extremely livable. When it’s warm enough to enjoy the great outdoors, the Airstream has an awesome added amenity — a drop-down deck with enough room for seating plus protective netting to keep bugs at bay. + Innovative Spaces Via Dwell Images via Innovative Spaces

The rest is here:
1973 Airstream is an ‘easy-breezy’ off-grid home with a fold-out deck

Kibardin shares creative recycled paper furniture designs

May 8, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Kibardin shares creative recycled paper furniture designs

Creating furniture is an age-old art form that has incorporated standard materials such as aluminum, wood and rattan. However, one artist has perfected a way to use another prolific material, cardboard, into furniture designs, and he’ll show you how to use it too. Vadim Kibardin, based out of KIBARDIN design studio in the Czech Republic, wants to encourage the kids, journalists and architects in all of us to think progressively and sustainably by getting hands-on with paper furniture design. Kibardin sees a world of opportunity between citizens who want sustainably made products and the wasteland of available cardboard readily available. With this combination in mind, he set out to develop and share furniture designs that can work as a family art project in any home.  Related: Designer Sophie Rowley creates marbled furniture from denim scraps On his website, you’ll find a black furniture collection with a sampling of furniture pieces he’s lovingly hand-contoured. Some are complete and ready for purchase, while others offer a design that can be made by request. Each piece is unique, as materials and the handmade approach vary. He doesn’t use a mold to replicate a design. The process involves adhering stacks of flattened cardboard  into thicknesses that add strength, then shaping them into chairs of varying designs.  Over his 25 years in the business, Kibardin has been commissioned to create unique pieces for private clients, galleries and museums. But his vision goes beyond creating art and building usable furniture while saving trees , to inspiring others to do the same. His Totem collection represents a creative art form that can be replicated in homes around the world.  As Kibardin explained, “Take a look at my Totem furniture collection. It is essentially a condensed version of my vision, which transcends trends by being functional as a serial product and handmade piece of art. I focus on construction and delivering key looks, without the styling and theatrics of a show. I can bring you modern solutions at affordable prices, just collect paper and cardboard packaging , download patterns and manuals, and produce it with your kids.” The basics are provided with an outline for decoupage-style stools, chairs and hourglass-shaped tables, but the idea is to inspire your own works of art. Kibardin encourages his site’s visitors to create their own paper art and then share images, instructions and a link for others to use. With this foundational support, Kibardin hopes everyone becomes part of this sustainable movement. + Kibardin Studios Images via Palisander Gallery and Vova Pomortzeff

Read the original: 
Kibardin shares creative recycled paper furniture designs

Skate the streets in style on these handmade wood skateboards

May 8, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Skate the streets in style on these handmade wood skateboards

With limited traffic on the roads, cruising down abandoned streets on a slick new skateboard can be a dream come true for many skateboarders. Thanks to  Rustek ‘s new collection of wooden skateboards, handcrafted out of  sustainably sourced wood,  we can all dream of popping sweet 180-degree ollies while soaring down the street. Portland-based Rustek has long been the skateboard builder of choice for many ‘boarders, mainly because the Rustek team is made up of skaters themselves. They build their products by hand, always working with help from local craftsmen. Made in their mobile shop trailer, the quality of their  skateboards  and gliders are top-notch. Related: This cool electric skateboard is made from recycled plastic As part of their commitment to quality, the Rustek team offers only the best when it comes to using  natural materials  in their designs. The skateboard decks are built under the company’s strict eco-friendly ethos, using only FSC-certified, sustainably-sourced wood and responsibly-sourced textiles such as leather and wool that are sourced from cruelty and chemical-free sources. Using natural building materials not only adds to the  sustainability of the skateboards, but also gives them a unique identity. In fact, each deck design is one-of-its-kind, featuring varying shapes and tones. According to the designers, this is part of what makes their product stand out from the millions of skateboards that are on the market. “We believe that the organic variation in each material is in part what makes them beautiful and ensures that every product we make is naturally unique. You will feel the difference in our wood phone cases and boards because of our commitment to sourcing high quality material,” Rustek explains on its website. In addition to the high-quality materials used to craft their skateboard range, the company is also very active in  protecting the environment . For example, the company plants a tree for every order and donates 10% of all profits to the National Park Service. + Rustek Skateboards Via Yanko Design Images via Rustek Skateboards

Excerpt from: 
Skate the streets in style on these handmade wood skateboards

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 20108 access attempts in the last 7 days.