LAGI announces location for 2018 renewable energy design competition

July 18, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on LAGI announces location for 2018 renewable energy design competition

Energy infrastructure of the past, like oil refineries and rigs, aren’t typically considered beautiful. But as the world transitions to more renewable sources of power, what if utility-scale energy installations could double as art ? That’s the dream pursued by the Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI), which holds a design competition every two years to present visions for energy-generating art able to power hundreds of homes. 2016’s winners included ethereal sailboats that harvested wind for power and fog for water, and a whale-inspired design generating wind, solar , and wave energy . LAGI just announced the location for their 2018 competition: Melbourne , Australia. LAGI is being sponsored by the State of Victoria to bring their 2018 contest to Melbourne, a city which hopes to be net zero by 2020. Artists, scientists, engineers, designers, and other creatives from around the world will be invited to submit designs tailored to the area for large-scale installations that add to the beauty of the area while generating clean energy . Related: Land Art Generator Initiative Santa Monica winners address California’s energy needs and drought One goal for these designs is to show how renewable energy installations, like solar and wind, can be integrated into the nature and culture of a region. LAGI2018 is part of Victoria’s Renewable Energy Action Plan under Action 13, which calls for “supporting important artistic and cultural sustainability events.” 2016’s top three winners included teams from Japan, Oregon, and Pennsylvania. The last four competitions – Dubai/Abu Dhabi in 2010, New York City in 2012, Copenhagen in 2014, and Santa Monica in 2016 – garnered over 800 submissions from more than 60 countries. The competition will launch in around six months, in January 2018, with submissions due in May. Public exhibitions will introduce some of the ideas to the people of Melbourne and nearby cities. According to LAGI, “2018 will be a year to celebrate the beauty of our sustainable future!” + Land Art Generator Initiative Images via Wikimedia Commons and courtesy of the Land Art Generator Initiative

Here is the original: 
LAGI announces location for 2018 renewable energy design competition

Biodesign Competition winners announced – algae takes center stage

October 5, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Biodesign Competition winners announced – algae takes center stage

When it comes to design, mother nature has a lot to teach us. The field of Biodesign has emerged as an exciting new discipline which integrates the best ideas from nature with the cutting edge of modern technology, fostering technological breakthroughs that could allow us to live better lives, more in harmony with our environment. We recently invited architects and designers from all across the world to submit their wildest visions for a Biodesigned future, and they delivered so much creativity and ingenuity that it was extremely difficult to narrow it all down to a short-list and then determine a winner. From algae structures, to aquaponic fish homes, to self-healing homes, we were thoroughly impressed by the entrants of our Biodesign Competition . And the winner is… GRAND PRIZE WINNER: Chlorella Oxygen Pavilion by Adam Miklosi Designer Adam Miklosi was inspired by the concept of symbiosis to create a futuristic oxygen bar called the Chlorella Pavillion which would allow tired people to enter, relax, and fill up on energizing, oxygen-rich air. Miklosi proposes piping living algae through the structure to create a swirling “algae fountain” throughout the exterior and interior of the space. Like all photosynthesizing organisms, algae naturally consumes CO2 and produces oxygen through respiration. Humans relaxing (and breathing) in the space would give the algae the CO2 it needs to survive, and, in turn, the algae would give Chlorella Pavilion visitors an extra oxygen boost. HEALING SPACES CATEGORY WINNER: Chlorella Oxygen Pavilion by Adam Miklosi The Chlorella Pavillon was the category winner for ‘Healing Spaces’ in addition to being selected by the judges as the Grand Prize Winner. Designer Adam Miklosi’s algae pavilions are built with molded beech wood and covered with a semi-transparent isolating film. Each pavilion is designed to live and breath interdependently with humans using photosynthesis – exhaled carbon dioxide and fresh oxygen mixes in the central algae fountain. The algae-filled water then circulates in tubes spiraling around the structure that soak up sunlight. Each pavilion is meant to be a “temple of relaxation” in a hectic urban environment. HOUSING CATEGORY WINNER: Self Healing House by Edwin Indera Waskita Designer Edwin Indera Waskita’s Self-Healing House explores the value of social sustainability by fostering communities in which humans, animals, plants, and the environment benefit from a mutual symbiosis. The proposal transforms marginalized city spaces into dynamic and productive zones (like urban farms ) to ensure positive and sustainable social growth. The Self-Healing House relies on community participation to improve both the quality of life of inhabitants and ecological balance, and it benefits residents through improved resource distribution. The Self-Healing House is wrapped in an “ecological skin” of mosses and plants which provide a source of food and water for birds. In exchange, by depositing new seeds and plant life, birds will encourage new growth of the skin. HONORABLE MENTIONS: Aquaponic Future Housing by Mihai Chiriac: Aquaponic Future Houses are 3-story homes made out of 3D-printed biodegradable vegetable-based bioplastic , housing living plants and fish in a closed-loop system, where the plants feed the fish, the fish feed the plants, plants produce oxygen for the home’s inhabitants and the fish produce food. In order to create a more sustainable environment, the building uses built-in hydroponics and aquaculture for growing food at home. The home is intended for neglected urban spaces to help urban dwellers live a greener, healthier life. Jellyfish Lodge by Janine Hung: The Jellyfish Lodge proposes to rehabilitate the world’s most polluted river slums by removing waste , treating water, growing food, and purifying air all through solar power. The structure’s jellyfish-inspired tentacles will remove garbage from the water while testing water toxicity levels, and microbial digestion chambers within the design will break down harmful microorganisms before returning treated water to the river. An aquaponics system would produce food for nearby residents. Oculus emergency shelter by Chalmers University of Technology: Oculus is a prototype for a rapidly deployable shelter inspired by the Beehive house – a traditional Syrian dwelling with bionic geometry. With a focus on material efficiency, the Oculus is a small den-style single-family unit made of expanded polystyrene (EPS). The dwelling consists of 29 rings set inside each other to form a stepping shell structure. The prototype was developed by 4 students at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden focusing on material efficiency, off-site manufacturing and low-tech assembly. It was developed as a case study through work with the Al-Zataari camp in Jordan. Algaevator urban revitalization by Jie Zhang: The Algaevator inserts an algae farm into a weather-tight, transparent and lightweight roofing system that can be used in abandoned buildings to help revitalize urban environments. The algae can be used for various applications in consumer products and alternative fuels. The Algaevator’s funnel shape optimizes sun exposure for algae production and can also harvest rainwater for additional sustainability. Hybrid Fibrous Morphologies by Ruxandra Gruioniu: Ruxandra Gruioniu’s Hybrid Fibrous Morphologies project seeks to create a new bio-integrative material system out of fungus. Gruioniu experimented with fusing living and non-living matter to develop a cost and energy-efficient architectural solution that resembles the biological model. Fungus is a very simple multicellular microorganism consisting of numerous filaments (hyphae) that have the ability to branch out and reconnect with each other to form a biological transport network over a manmade structure, such as a metal lattice. Urban Pure BioTower Dennis Dollens: Urban Pure: BioTowers are environmentally-friendly buildings for housing, schools, or offices. The design for the towers was inspired by the shape of plants and trees to support healthy living. Enhanced using synthetic biology, AI, and biorobotics, BioTowers “eat” air pollution while contributing energy and green spaces to modern cities. + Inhabitat Biodesign Competition

Original post: 
Biodesign Competition winners announced – algae takes center stage

Tel Aviv’s notorious ‘Garbage Mountain’ transforms into world’s largest recycling park

February 2, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Tel Aviv’s notorious ‘Garbage Mountain’ transforms into world’s largest recycling park

Every day, Hiriya sorts 3,000 tons of household waste, 1,500 tons of construction debris and 250 tons of landscape matter, and transforms it into fuel, fertilizer, electricity, water for irrigation, and even garden furniture, in what may be one of the greatest landfill transformations the world has ever seen. Read on to learn how Hiriya is decreasing its carbon impact on the environment each day, with the help of landscape architect and urban planner Peter Latz and his visionary design that has turned trash into treasure. Read the rest of Tel Aviv’s notorious ‘Garbage Mountain’ transforms into world’s largest recycling park Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Ariel Sharon , ariel sharon park , Ayalon park , Ben Gurion International Airport , biogas , bioplastic , crap mountain , design competitions , garbage mountain , hiriya , hiriya landfill , international parks , Israel , landfills , largest recycling facility in the world , peter latz , peter latz landscape architecture , public parks , recycling facility , Tel Aviv , transfer station , urban planning , world’s largest recycling plant

Originally posted here:
Tel Aviv’s notorious ‘Garbage Mountain’ transforms into world’s largest recycling park

You can make $13,000 a year by selling your poop

February 2, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on You can make $13,000 a year by selling your poop

Need some cash? Just sell your poop. Yes, you read that right. A company called OpenBiome needs healthy stool samples that it uses to treat patients with a bacterial infection called C. difficile . Should you choose to sell it, your poop will be turned into a pill to treat those patients and you’ll bring home about $250 each week, or $13,000 a year. Read the rest of You can make $13,000 a year by selling your poop Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: c. difficile , c. difficile treatment , capsules of poop , fecal matter , healthy poop , mark smith , openbiome , poop , poop for treatment , stool samples

Read the original post: 
You can make $13,000 a year by selling your poop

Greenpeace Launches Competition to Design New Look for Iconic Survival Pod

April 17, 2013 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Greenpeace Launches Competition to Design New Look for Iconic Survival Pod

Read the rest of Greenpeace Launches Competition to Design New Look for Iconic Survival Pod Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: compact pod , Design , design competitions , dome-shaped vessel , eco design , eco-messaging , environmental activism , Graphic Design , Greenpeace , Greenpeace design competition , shelter , survival pod , sustainable design        

Original post: 
Greenpeace Launches Competition to Design New Look for Iconic Survival Pod

Herzog & de Meuron’s Zurich Children’s Hospital Will Be Built Around a Series of Courtyards

June 11, 2012 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Herzog & de Meuron’s Zurich Children’s Hospital Will Be Built Around a Series of Courtyards

The board of Kinderspital Zürich announced that Swiss architecture firm  Herzog & de Meuron has been selected to design a new children’s hospital in Zurich. The plan calls for two buildings: a rectangular, three-story children’s hospital and a round, six-story center for teaching and research. Both buildings will be interrupted by large, plant-filled courtyards that will bring natural light into the buildings, while giving patients and workers a place to step outside and take in some fresh air. Read the rest of Herzog & de Meuron’s Zurich Children’s Hospital Will Be Built Around a Series of Courtyards Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Children’s Hospital , design competitions , Herzog & De Meuron , hospital design , jacques herzog , Kinderspital Zürich , Pierre de Meuron , Switzerland , Zurich

Go here to see the original: 
Herzog & de Meuron’s Zurich Children’s Hospital Will Be Built Around a Series of Courtyards

Forget Airplanes, Travel Via Cloud: Floating Zeppelin Network by Tiago Barros

October 18, 2011 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Forget Airplanes, Travel Via Cloud: Floating Zeppelin Network by Tiago Barros

Images: Tiago Barros In a world where everything seems to operate at hyper-speeds (often at the expense of the environment), we’re well aware of the apparent benefits behind such movements as ” slow food ” ” slow cities ” and ” slow design .” But what about “

Read the rest here: 
Forget Airplanes, Travel Via Cloud: Floating Zeppelin Network by Tiago Barros

Hövding Airbag Helmet Wins World’s Largest Design Prize

September 2, 2011 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Hövding Airbag Helmet Wins World’s Largest Design Prize

Images credit Hovdig We were so intrigued by the Hövding airbag bike helmet that we covered it twice, here and here. While we might have been a bit dubious about a $500 one-shot helmet designed to prevent helmet head, the judges at INDEX , the world’s biggest design prize,… Read the full story on TreeHugger

Excerpt from:
Hövding Airbag Helmet Wins World’s Largest Design Prize

China, US, India Add Most Wind Power in 2011 So Far

September 2, 2011 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on China, US, India Add Most Wind Power in 2011 So Far

photo: Scott Wilcoxson / CC BY A new report from the World Wind Energy Association tracks new wind power installations in the first half of 2011, with China, the United States and India leading the pack. Though new installations were lower in Germany and Spain, strong commitment to renewable energy in previous years means both rem… Read the full story on TreeHugger

Read the original here: 
China, US, India Add Most Wind Power in 2011 So Far

Endless Chair Goes Straight From Lineland to Spaceland, Skips Flatland

August 24, 2011 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Endless Chair Goes Straight From Lineland to Spaceland, Skips Flatland

Image credit DMY One of the winners of the top award at the International Design Festival Berlin was Endless by Dutch designer Dirk Vander Kooij. He melts down refrigerators for the plastic raw material, extrudes it into a string, and then has a robot “double it back and forth until it forms a seat.”… Read the full story on TreeHugger

See the original post here: 
Endless Chair Goes Straight From Lineland to Spaceland, Skips Flatland

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 2883 access attempts in the last 7 days.