Desertec Solar Power Project Abandoned by Shareholders

October 16, 2014 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Desertec Solar Power Project Abandoned by Shareholders

The ambitious, multibillion dollar solar power project Desertec has been abandoned by all but three of its shareholders and will now continue in an “adapted format” as a consultancy. The project was expected to provide up to 20 percent of Europe’s energy needs by 2050, importing power from farms in North Africa and the Middle East. Despite estimates that more energy could be harvested from the desert sun in six hours than humanity could use in a year, the project’s backers have steadily withdrawn, citing high costs, a reluctance to invest in the region, and the fact that Europe seems to be doing a very good job of producing renewably sourced energy at home, thank you very much. Read the rest of Desertec Solar Power Project Abandoned by Shareholders Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Desertec , Desertec abandoned by shareholders , Europe , global development , Middle East , North Africa , renewable energy schemes , shareholders , Solar Power

The rest is here: 
Desertec Solar Power Project Abandoned by Shareholders

Morocco Plans to Produce 14% of its Energy From Solar Power by 2020

September 13, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Morocco Plans to Produce 14% of its Energy From Solar Power by 2020

Many countries in the Middle East and North Africa are embracing solar power to take advantage of the copious amount of sunlight they receive. Recently the  Moroccan Agency For Solar Energy (MASEN) announced that they are “very confident” of securing the investment needed to build vast solar power plants in the country’s southern desert regions. The country is on its way to become a world-class solar energy producer, and it plans to harvest 14% of its energy from the sun by 2020. Read the rest of Morocco Plans to Produce 14% of its Energy From Solar Power by 2020 Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “solar energy” , Desertec , hybrid power plant , Middle East , middle east solar energy , Moroccan Agency For Solar Energy (MASEN) , morocco , natural gas , North Africa , solar plant , Solar Power

The rest is here:
Morocco Plans to Produce 14% of its Energy From Solar Power by 2020

India Announces Plans to Produce 33.4 Gigawatts of Solar Energy by 2022

January 3, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on India Announces Plans to Produce 33.4 Gigawatts of Solar Energy by 2022

As the world’s second-most populous country and a growing global power, India would do well to think about its energy future, and it seems to be doing so . According to a report by  Bridge to India , the country is aiming to install 33.4 GW of solar power nationwide — much more than the 20 GW previously targeted by India’s National Solar Mission. Read the rest of India Announces Plans to Produce 33.4 Gigawatts of Solar Energy by 2022 Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “solar energy” , bridge of india , china solar energy , Desertec , india 2020 , india solar capacity , India solar energy , india solar energy output , india solar power , India’s National solar Mission , NSM India , solar energy gw , solar schedule india

Read more:
India Announces Plans to Produce 33.4 Gigawatts of Solar Energy by 2022

7 Projects that aim to harness clean energy on a grand scale

October 21, 2011 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on 7 Projects that aim to harness clean energy on a grand scale

Ankit Dahiya: Desertec One of the projects in North Africa that aim to harness clean energy on a grand scale. With the increase in global warming levels and also in the increase in the levels of pollution, the scientists have started going for renewable sources of energy or you can call it clean source of energy. These clean sources of energy do not pollute the environment and are quite cheap when compared to other conventional sources of producing energy. Thus they are so popular and everybody out there wants to try their hands on it. This clean source of energy has resulted in generation of large amount of energy to meet the growing needs of the population. There are various projects being undertaken to harness the renewable sources of energy on large scale. Here is a list of seven such projects that aim to harness clean energy on a grand scale. 1. Desertec The basic concept behind this grand scale project is that the desert area on Earth is large which is not being utilized properly. The desert areas are hot and are more concentrated with solar energy and thus can become a major source for producing solar energy. It is estimated that this Desertec project will produce the energy from the deserts of North Africa which will be quite enough to power all the Europe. This project is being developed on a large scale to utilize the most out of solar energy. More than twelve European companies have already invested in this plan and it will be decided by the end of year 2013. 2. Desertec Australia The Desertec Australia project is quite similar to the North Africa’s. This project will start in Australia which is believed to become the power house of Asia soon. Australia really has a strong solar potential and its climate is quite suitable for this project. This project would cost around $2.5tn and $5tn. The power generated can be transported through the direct current cables to the most parts of Asia. 3. The UK’s round three offshore wind farms The UK has come up with this huge power plant project which is expected to light up entire UK. This is actually a Wind farm which is to be constructed on the off shores of UK to utilize the most out of wind energy. This plant will have a capacity of 40GW overall and out of which 25GW is estimated to be completed by 2020. This project is highly appreciated as it is making the grand scale use of wind energy without creating any disturbance in environment. 4. China’s Jiuquan onshore wind farm China has always tried to make its economy the best one by going for various energy plans. This time they have come up with this grand scale wind energy farm which they are planning to setup by 2020. This project will produce an estimated energy of 20,000MW and the cost incurred for the project will be around Â¥120bn (£10.7bn). The construction of the project has already started and its being constructed rapidly to meet the needs of the growing population. 5. The severn tidal barrage UK has come up with various power plant projects and one of them is the tidal power plant. Since the UK is at the center of the ocean it has the advantage of all the forms of energy and they actually are making use of all these forms quite effectively. This power plant will overall produce an energy of 8.6 GW which will be the highest energy produced by any tidal power plant. This project would cost around £30bn and is estimated to start soon. 6 The Wando Hoenggan project The Ireland plant of tidal power is the largest power plant in the world till date but this will be outstripped by the grand scale power plant project which is being developed by South Korea. The South Korea has come up with a grand scale tidal power plant which will be producing 10GW of energy and the cost incurred for the project is estimated to be around $820m. This project will be built by the top UK firm named Lunar Energy and Korean Midland Power Company. 7. The Tsangpo-Brahmaputra hydroelectric dam China is currently leading the production of hydroelectric energy but will soon be surpassed by the latest project which is being estimated to produce double the energy produced out of all the dams in China. This large scale power plant will be developed on the river Brahmaputra and is named as Tsangpo-Brahmaputra hydroelectric dam. It will have a total capacity of producing 38GW of energy which is equivalent to half as large of the UK’s entire grid.

Here is the original post:
7 Projects that aim to harness clean energy on a grand scale

What’s next: Highly efficient thin film solar panels

October 21, 2011 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on What’s next: Highly efficient thin film solar panels

Jaspreet Kaur Walia: Highly efficient thin film solar panels Highly efficient thin film solar panels the futuristic renewable energy resource As we know it Thin Film Solar Cells or TFSC are solar cells in actuality. Also known as thin film photovoltaic cells or TFPC, they consist of a substrate that is used to place thin layers of photovoltaic material one above the other. They come in a wide variety and give people the flexibility to pick and choose in terms of fabrication and design. A lot of substrates can be used to deposit the different layers along with a variety of techniques. The performance of a device can be enhanced by tailoring and engineering the layers. The thickness of these layers can vary and range from as less as a few nanometers to tens of micrometers. TFSC are split into various categories depending on the kind of photovoltaic material that has been used to make them. They are commercially available and can be installed on roofs to convert solar energy into electricity. Need for change Traditional silicon based cells are thick and hence have a problem absorbing light as compared to thin film solar cells. TFSCs use less material as compared to silicon ones and are also light in weight. These can be effortlessly deposited on supple substrates as well. No doubt silicon is cheap and readily available, but the amount of energy and processing required getting the crystalline structure and purity is very high in comparison with thin film solar cells. What’s Next? 1. IBM thin-film PV solar cell IBM thin-film PV solar cell IBM’s New Thin-film Solar Cell is 40% More Efficient What’s new IBM has developed an all new thin-film PV solar cell that is 9.6 percent efficient. It has been made from earth abundant materials and is thought to be the one of the most efficient thin film solar cell. The wide production will be achieved because of the presence of tin, zinc, copper, selenium and/or sulfur. The device will perform without getting obstructed by impurities like carbon, chlorine or oxygen because of the presence of hydrazine. What difference will it make Thin-film PV solar cell by IBM is able to achieve 40 percent more efficiency than its previous products in the same league. It is 9.6 percent efficient which is quite commendable keeping in mind it has been made using earth abundant materials. There are more commercial versions available that boast of an 11 percent efficiency but not to forget they have been created from expensive compounds such as cadmium, gallium, copper, indium and tellurium that pumps up their price as well. Usage of earth abundant materials makes it possible to produce it at a large scale. Problems The concept is at its initial stages so no one knows what the final product will be like. Moreover, chances are people may opt for something that gives higher efficiency irrespective of the price tag it comes stashed with. IBM is on no mood to manufacture Thin-film PV solar cells but is thinking to license the technology, which may again take time. 2. SoloPower thin-film rooftops solar cells SoloPower thin-film rooftops solar cells SoloPower’s thin-film flexible solar cells for commercial rooftops What’s new SoloPower has unveiled a line of thin-film rooftop solar cells in a hope to lower the cost of solar energy. These flexible panels are light in weight and easy to install. They are apt for commercial use and have been made by coupling gallium, indium, selenium and copper. These materials have been positioned on a supple foil and company has made good use of roll to roll electroplating process. Usage of this process makes the solar panels very cost competitive in comparison to other technologies and manufacturers available in the market. What difference will it make SoloPower thin-film rooftop solar cells weigh much lighter than the glass encased panels. It can easily achieve an efficiency of 11 percent, which is worth applauding. These are easy to install rooftop solar cells that can be used at a commercial level. They have been specially designed for commercial buildings with a flat roof where they can be laminated onto the rooftop. Problems The use of expensive materials will definitely make the line expensive. It won’t be picked by people who want a cost-effective solution for their homes. 3. CIGS thin film solar cell CIGS thin film solar cell CIGS thin film solar cell by Researchers at the Chinese University of Hong Kong What’s new CIGS thin film solar cell does not need buckets of cash in terms of making it and is being developed by researchers at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. The best part being it can be used for a variety of purposes which includes installation on outer walls, rooftops plus handbags and even backpacks. This is quite impressive and makes sure that people can use solar energy efficiently and effectively. What difference will it make The thin film solar cell by CIGS can effortlessly touch 17 percent conversion efficiency. This will allow people to charge electronic gadgets right away without having to hunt for an electric socket. If this becomes a reality and the solar cells are installed on all roofs of the city, it is expected that almost 40 percent of electricity needs can be fulfilled by using just solar cells. Problems Since they are being produced using Cu(InGa)Se2 it may take a good number of years for these thin film solar cell to overpower crystalline silicon solar cell that dominate the present day markets and are very popular.

Go here to read the rest:
What’s next: Highly efficient thin film solar panels

The good, the bad and the ugly about vertical axis wind turbines

October 21, 2011 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on The good, the bad and the ugly about vertical axis wind turbines

Leka Ram: Vertical axis wind turbines Main rotor shaft is set vertically and the main components are located at the base of the turbine Vertical wind turbines look completely different from the conventional wind turbines that have blades rotating on the horizontal axis. The vertical turbine can be compared to a coin spinning on its vertical axis. Modifications in the design and structure have been done for improving the performance and serving more benefits. The major parts of the vertical wind turbine are a rotor shaft that is arranged vertically, a vertical wind generator located near the ground, a gearbox also located near the ground and the blades that are two or three in number. These wind turbines are being improved in terms of function and design for enjoying more advantages. There are different types of vertical axis wind turbines such as; Darrius turbine : Named after George Darrius, the French inventor. The turbine is known for its efficiency. However, it is criticized for the low torque. It requires an additional rotor to start it. Gorlov Helical turbne : This turbine is designed in a helical configuration and was built to deal with the problems in the Darrius turbine. They are self-starting and reliable. Giromill : It is a variation of Darius turbine. It offers high starting torque and variable pitch. The blades used in this type of turbines are curved, straight or v-shaped. Savonius turbine : The turbine has helical scoops for providing smooth torque. Most of these are self-starting. Apart from these there are many other types such as the neo-aerodynamic turbine, quiet revolution turbine, novel turbine and zephyr turbine. The good Low Cost Lower construction and transportation costs 1. The energy generation with the vertical turbines cost is less and comes to about 2.5-3.5 cents for a kilowatt hour when compared to the 4-5 cents per kilowatt hour. 2. These turbines can handle high wind speeds. The maximum speed for harvesting the energy from wind is 28-33 mph. With the vertical design it can produce electricity from winds with a speed of 70 mph. The design can be used in areas with very strong winds. 3. One of the major problems with the conventional wind mills is that they kill the birds that come in their way. The design of the vertical turbine looks like a solid structure keeping the birds away from it. 4. The new device blends well with the environment. It can be painted in such a way that it blends well with the surroundings. Being smaller they can be installed in areas where huge structures cannot be used. 5. Another advantage is that the generator can be easily accessed for service. There is no magnetic field resonance, interference with communication or aircraft navigation and no ground resonance. 6. They function quietly too. Can this be better? The major difference between the vertical and horizontal wind turbines is the position of the blades. In the horizontal model the blades are mounted on the top while in the vertical model they are at the base of the tower and close to the shaft. The main advantage is that they can be mounted close to the ground making it beneficial for residential purposes. The bad Inefficiency Blades constantly spinning back into the wind causing drag 1. When compared to the horizontal turbines, these vertical axis wind turbines are able to produce only about 50 percent of the energy. 2. Since no tower is required for the structure, they are not able to take advantage of the high wind speeds usually available on elevated and higher areas. 3. Some energy is required to start the device because of the low starting torque. 4. If any part of the device is damaged, the entire structure has to be disassembled for changing it. 5. Wires are required for holding the complete structure in place. 6. The vertical wind turbines have a complicated structure with high rate of failure. 7. Wind efficiency is low and costs higher. Can this be avoided? New designs of the vertical axis turbines are being made in order to deal with the problems faced by the earlier designs. More research and analysis is still required to develop a turbine without the above mentioned drawbacks. The ugly Bird Killing Wind turbines affect migratory birds Though wind energy is considered to be one of the renewable and dependable sources of energy, there are several downsides to this. 1. Wind is not dependable. To turn the blades you need wind. If there is no wind they cannot function effectively. They are great only for areas where you can have wind all through the day and year. They may be useless in areas where wind is less. 2. One of the best places where you can get wind all through the year is the coastal areas, mountain tops and valleys. All these areas are very expensive and it can be very difficult to afford the area first and then build the turbine also. 3. Many people consider wind farms as an eyesore. Though they are able to produce energy using the wind, many people do not like the idea of residing near a wind farm. 4. Apart from that, the turbines are also known to interfere with the radio and television signals, kill birds and make noise. Why are we so critical Every new invention has its advantages and disadvantages. Similarly, the wind turbines faced some problems with respect to the availability of winds for turning the turbines, birds coming in between and so on. However, the researchers are trying to find solutions to each of these problems by creating new designs and using improved technologies. This gave rise to the vertical axis turbines. Though there are some negative aspects to this too, the researchers are striving hard to overcome them. Wind is everywhere. We need to make proper efforts to use it to the maximum in order to save other sources of energy and use the renewable sources in an effective way. The bottom line Wind energy is renewable. More and more devices have to be developed to harness the wind energy for generating electricity. The wind mills are efficient in generating energy. The type of turbines used depends on the area and the amount of power required in that particular area.

Go here to see the original:
The good, the bad and the ugly about vertical axis wind turbines

Bad Behavior has blocked 1069 access attempts in the last 7 days.