Morgan Stanley’s role in addressing the plastic waste problem

September 23, 2020 by  
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Morgan Stanley’s role in addressing the plastic waste problem When Morgan Stanley decided to launch its Plastic Waste Resolution in April 2019, it had realized that plastic waste was a business issue. That was after looking at its global client base, which includes companies across industries from chemicals to consumer packaging, as well as individuals and governments.  “We realized that actually gives you the entire plastic waste value chain, from creation, use, disposal, reuse or not, disposal or not,” said Audrey Choi, chief marketing officer and chief sustainability officer at Morgan Stanley, “Although we ourselves weren’t [on the] frontlines of any of those stages, we really touched all of it.” As a financial institution, Choi said the company realized it had a role to play in addressing the plastic waste problem at the systems level. Joel Makower, chairman and executive editor at GreenBiz, interviewed Audrey Choi, chief marketing officer and chief sustainability officer at Morgan Stanley, during Circularity 20, which took place August 25-27, 2020. View archived videos from the conference here . Deonna Anderson Wed, 09/23/2020 – 16:45 Featured Off

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Morgan Stanley’s role in addressing the plastic waste problem

How Tetra Pak plans to reach net zero by 2030

September 23, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green, Recycle

How Tetra Pak plans to reach net zero by 2030 If you’ve ever drank juice from a carton package, it may have been supplied by Tetra Pak, a multinational food processing and packaging company. One of its ambitions is to deliver “packages made entirely from renewable and/or recycled materials that are fully recyclable,” according to the company site. And it seems to be moving toward that goal. “If you take our standard package, you’ll see that around 71 percent of the raw materials come from a renewable source today,” said Luana Pinheiro, sustainability manager at Tetra Pak. “Our packages offer a lower carbon footprint when compared to other alternatives.” Now the company is working to further improve its sustainability efforts by committing to reaching net-zero greenhouse gas emissions in its operations by 2030 and across its entire value chain by 2050. Shana Rappaport, vice president and executive director of VERGE at GreenBiz Group, interviewed Luana Pinheiro, sustainability manager at Tetra Pak, during Circularity 20, which took place August 25-27, 2020. View archived videos from the conference here . Deonna Anderson Wed, 09/23/2020 – 14:07 Featured Off

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How Tetra Pak plans to reach net zero by 2030

Rheaply is helping companies and organizations of all sizes expand their circularity

September 23, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Rheaply is helping companies and organizations of all sizes expand their circularity Back in January, GreenBiz published a story about Rheaply , a resource management and exchange platform. But a lot has changed since the beginning of the year. When the COVID-19 pandemic started, the company shifted gears to support those who need personal protective gear through its Emergency Resource Exchange. “What we’ve tried to do is use our technology, which connects people to items traditionally, specifically to help with PPE sourcing during this unprecedented time in global history,” said Garry Cooper, CEO of Rheaply. As the pandemic rages on and the company continues to get people the resources they need to address it, there are still other valuable items sitting idle on shelves that other people can use instead of buying new ones. It’s important for companies and organizations to continue to — or start to — move toward zero waste practices. “Moving towards a system and an economy by which we do not waste things, we view usage over consumption and access over ownership is super important,” Cooper said. “Zero waste is the mechanism that every company, government and organization should be taking hold to make operational today.” Deonna Anderson, associate editor at GreenBiz Group, interviewed Garry Cooper, CEO of Rheaply during Circularity 20, which took place August 25-27, 2020. View archived videos from the conference here: http://grn.bz/MWn . Deonna Anderson Wed, 09/23/2020 – 11:08 Featured Off

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Rheaply is helping companies and organizations of all sizes expand their circularity

Don’t be square: How to tell a successful, circular story that sticks

September 16, 2020 by  
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Don’t be square: How to tell a successful, circular story that sticks How can companies effectively communicate circular initiatives without confusing or alienating customers and stakeholders? The circular economy is becoming a centerpiece of many corporate sustainability strategies. Yet companies often struggle to translate this into stories that inform and engage employees, customers, investors and other stakeholders. This poses a problem because if we hope to unlock the circular economy’s full potential, we’ll need to make sure that it’s understood and embraced by all — and not just sustainability wonks. In this session, panelists explore how companies are learning to leverage the power of narrative to educate and inspire stakeholders on their circular ambitions, products and service offerings. Deonna Anderson Tue, 09/15/2020 – 17:01 Featured Off

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Don’t be square: How to tell a successful, circular story that sticks

How BASF’s reciChain aims to improve traceability of recycled plastics

September 12, 2020 by  
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How BASF’s reciChain aims to improve traceability of recycled plastics The vision for BASF’s reciChain project is to take circularity into the real world by increasing traceability of recycled plastics. The company created a plastic additive that enables the traceability. Mitchell Toomey, director of sustainability for North America at BASF, shared an example of how it could work on a laundry detergent bottle: “Once that product goes to the end of its life and goes into recycling, it can be scanned an tracked at that point in time to give the recycler some information about what it contains,” he said, noting that the tracker could show the types of resins and plastics the packaging is made of. Toomey added that once a product is recycled, the tracker can be maintained through multiple uses. The pilot will need to be scaled to have a big impact but BASF is already working with partners across the value chain. “We believe by showing this proof of concept and showing that such a tracking material could actually work, we could revolutionize how sorting and recycling goes,” Toomey said. John Davies, vice president and senior analyst at GreenBiz, interviewed Mitchell Toomey, director of sustainability for North America at BASF, during Circularity 20, which took place on August 25-27, 2020. View archived videos from the conference here . Deonna Anderson Sat, 09/12/2020 – 14:47 Featured Off

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How BASF’s reciChain aims to improve traceability of recycled plastics

Episode 224: Biodiversity, climate tech and voices of clean energy equity

June 12, 2020 by  
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Episode 224: Biodiversity, climate tech and voices of clean energy equity Heather Clancy Fri, 06/12/2020 – 02:15 Week in Review Stories discussed this week. Leading the sustainability transformation Funding climate tech and entrepreneurs of color should go hand in hand How sustainability professionals can uplift the black community How on-demand delivery apps could encourage low-carbon food Features A new angel fund dedicated to decarbonization (18:50) Ramez Naam, futurist and board member for Seattle-based angel investor network E8 , chats about the new Decarbon-8 fund and why seeking racially diverse founders will be a priority. “Because if we are going to help some people build companies in this, and they’re going to profit, as the entrepreneurs should, we’d like some of that to go back into those people, in those communities,” he says.  Funding biodiversity (31:14) William Ginn, author of the new book ” Valuing Nature ,” talks with Associate Editor Deonna Anderson about ways the private sector can address biodiversity. Voices of the clean energy equity movement (48:25) GreenBiz Senior Analyst Sarah Golden shares highlights of conversations with Bartees Cox, director of marketing and communications at Groundswell , an organization that brings community solar to low-income customers; Alexis Cureton, former electric vehicle fellow at GRID Alternatives , which works to bring clean energy jobs and access to low-income communities; and Taj Eldridge, senior director of investment at Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator. *Music in this episode by Blue Dot Sessions, AdmiralBob 77, Stefan Kartenburg and Lee Rosevere: “Throughput,” “Our Fingers Cold” and “Hundred Mile — Atmospheric” (Blue Dot); “Two Guitars” (AdmiralBob 77); “The Vendetta,” “Guitale’s Happy Place” and “Arc de Triomphe” (Kartenburg); “Curiosity” and “I’m Going for a Coffee” (Rosevere) *This episode was sponsored by UPS. Virtual conversations Mark your calendar for these upcoming GreenBiz webcasts. Can’t join live? All of these events also will be available on demand. The future of risk assessment. Ideas for building a supply chain resilient to both short-term disruptions such as the pandemic and long-term risks such as climate change. Register here for the session at 1 p.m. EDT June 16. Supply chains and circularity. Join us at 1 p.m. EDT June 23 for a discussion of how companies such as Interface are getting suppliers to buy into circular models for manufacturing, distribution and beyond.  Fleet of clean fleet. Real-life lessons for trucking’s future. Sign up for the conversation at 1 p.m. EDT July 2. Resources galore State of the Profession. Our sixth report examining the evolving role of corporate sustainability leaders. Download it here . The State of Green Business 2020. Our 13th annual analysis of key metrics and trends published here . Do we have a newsletter for you! We produce six weekly newsletters: GreenBuzz by Executive Editor Joel Makower (Monday); Transport Weekly by Senior Writer and Analyst Katie Fehrenbacher (Tuesday); VERGE Weekly by Executive Director Shana Rappaport and Editorial Director Heather Clancy (Wednesday); Energy Weekly by Senior Energy Analyst Sarah Golden (Thursday); Food Weekly by Carbon and Food Analyst Jim Giles (Thursday); and Circular Weekly by Director and Senior Analyst Lauren Phipps (Friday). You must subscribe to each newsletter in order to receive it. Please visit this page to choose which you want to receive. The GreenBiz Intelligence Panel is the survey body we poll regularly throughout the year on key trends and developments in sustainability. To become part of the panel, click here . Enrolling is free and should take two minutes. Stay connected To make sure you don’t miss the newest episodes of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes . Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at 350@greenbiz.com . Contributors Joel Makower Deonna Anderson Sarah Golden Topics Podcast Energy & Climate Food & Agriculture Equity & Inclusion Environmental Justice Biodiversity Innovation Climate Tech Collective Insight GreenBiz 350 Podcast Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 1:00:19 Sponsored Article Off GreenBiz Close Authorship

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Episode 224: Biodiversity, climate tech and voices of clean energy equity

Two ways P&G is working toward its packaging goals

May 5, 2020 by  
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Two ways P&G is working toward its packaging goals Deonna Anderson Tue, 05/05/2020 – 11:33 Procter & Gamble’s Tide laundry detergent brand first introduced in January 2019 its “Eco-Box,” which has been compared to a wine box because of its design made from paperboard with a tap for dispensing, in an effort to reduce the plastic in its packaging. In mid-May, the Eco-Boxes are becoming available for other fabric care product lines, including Tide purclean, Downy, Gain and Dreft. The initiatives are related to P&G’s current sustainability goals introduced in 2018, Ambition 2030, which include a commitment to make its packaging 100 percent recyclable or reusable by 2030.  Each business unit within P&G has its own approach, and the Eco-Box was one way P&G’s Fabric Care division set out to meet its packaging goal.  To be clear, the Eco-Box package still includes plastic — with the bag that holds the liquid detergent itself — but uses 60 percent less of it than the traditional packaging for P&G’s detergent brands. I think perfection is [figuring] out the technologies to make this so that that bag and tap are also just easy curbside recycling. “We’ve moved to a huge reduction in plastic, but [the plastic bag] not curbside-recyclable,” said Todd Cline, section head for P&G Fabric Care’s research and development team. “I think perfection is [figuring] out the technologies to make this so that that bag and tap are also just easy curbside recycling,” he continued. “But there’s just not technologies for that yet today, to create bags to hold liquids that are puncture-resistant and will survive all of the shipping.” In the meantime, P&G has a stopgap solution for collection and end-of-life processing in place. When the Tide Eco-Box launched, P&G partnered with TerraCycle to offer a recycling option for the inner bag. That program will continue, now including the full Eco-Box portfolio. Cline said P&G uses life cycle assessment (LCA) to guide its work, “particularly as it comes to sustainability,” noting that from an LCA standpoint, P&G is making a huge reduction in its carbon footprint and amount of plastic that’s going to landfills through the Eco-Box packaging effort.  “For us, that’s a technical trade-off at the start. But it’s one of those that if we waited for perfection … we would be sitting on this technology that could have a really great benefit from a sustainability standpoint, but holding it until it’s perfect,” Cline said, referring to the need to engage TerraCycle on collection.  When the new Eco-Box detergents hit the market — the products will be available online only from major U.S. retailers — Cline said they will continue to test and iterate on the packaging to improve it. All paper, no plastic In a different part of the company, P&G Beauty, the packaging strategy is likewise taking another turn away from plastic: toward all-paper packaging. Indeed, these are just two recent examples of how P&G is working to meet its 2030 goal. “This is just one of many innovations that P&G is working on to address the problem of plastic waste. This is an important step forward, and there is much more to come,” wrote Anitra Marsh, associate director of global sustainability and brand communications with P&G Beauty, by email. Two of those beauty and personal care brands are Old Spice and Secret, which will launch all-paper packaging for their aluminum-free deodorants this month at 500 Walmart stores in the U.S. “As the largest retailer in the world partnering with the largest deodorant and antiperspirant brands in the U.S., we know this new paperboard package has the potential to have significant positive impact and lay the groundwork for even broader impact,” said Jason Kloster, senior buying manager for body care and grooming at Walmart, in a press release. Marsh said P&G co-designed the all-paper deodorant packaging for its Secret and Old Spice products with consumers interested in cutting back on plastic waste. The package format contains 90 percent post-consumer recycled content and 10 percent new paper fibers. P&G developed package prototypes then shared the designs with consumers to see which options were “most appealing and easy to use.” P&G isn’t the only company trying to eliminate plastic packaging for deodorant. Across the pond in London, a company called Wild raised $621,775 in seed funding for its refillable no-plastic deodorant packaging — made from durable aluminum and bamboo pulp — after a successful pilot launch in 2019. Marsh said it took less than a year to bring P&G’s all-paper, plastic-free deodorant packaging to market. During the development process, the first package design did not pass a key recyclability test because the glue used for the label diminished the quality of the recycled paper pulp. “We quickly went back to the drawing board to find another label glue that doesn’t impede recycling, and this is what we are using now in our Old Spice and Secret paper tube packages that are launching in May,” she said. The deodorant hit the shelves May 1, and P&G will continue to evaluate the recyclability and repulpability of the packaging this summer, according to Marsh. “We are aiming for 100 percent recyclability,” she said. Pull Quote I think perfection is [figuring] out the technologies to make this so that that bag and tap are also just easy curbside recycling. Topics Circular Economy Design & Packaging Circular Packaging Packaging Recycled Paper Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Tide, Dreft and Gain detergents in eco-box packaging

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Two ways P&G is working toward its packaging goals

Episode 193: Combating food waste, measuring plastic footprints, get ready to advocate

October 18, 2019 by  
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Plus, meet the latest addition to the GreenBiz editorial team, Associate Editor Deonna Anderson.

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Episode 193: Combating food waste, measuring plastic footprints, get ready to advocate

Iowa’s farmers are ready for a national discussion on transforming US agriculture

October 18, 2019 by  
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Incremental change in agriculture is not moving quickly enough.

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Iowa’s farmers are ready for a national discussion on transforming US agriculture

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