New metro stations extend sustainable, site-sensitive transit in Denmark

July 10, 2020 by  
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Copenhagen-based architecture firm Cobe teamed up with Arup on the recently completed Orientkaj and Nordhavn — two new metro stations that connect Copenhagen’s northern docklands with the city center. Developed as part of one of the largest urban regeneration projects in Northern Europe, the metro stations aim to revitalize the post-industrial area with a passenger-focused design and appearance reflective of the urban areas they serve. The two metro stations are expected to serve 9,000 daily users by 2025. Recently opened in March 2020, the two metro stations connect Copenhagen Central Station to Nordhavn in just 4 minutes. Each metro station was designed with site-specific characteristics. The overground Orientkaj station takes inspiration from a shipping container as a nod to the Brutalist and large-scale dockland buildings with boxy construction built of glass, concrete and aluminum. Large spans of glazing frame views of the area across Øresund into Sweden. Set above the Orientkaj dock and clad in reflective anodized aluminum cladding, the station was created as an eye-catching local landmark and a prototype for future overground stations in Nordhavn, a new city district designed by Cobe that will eventually encompass over 1,500,000 square meters of sustainable, mixed-use development. Related: COBE unveils images of LEED Gold-targeted Adidas HQ in Germany In contrast, the underground Nordhavn station is defined by folded, origami-like ceramic panels and an interior clad in red tiles characteristic of Cityringen’s interchange stations for design consistency. Both the overground Orientkaj station and the underground Nordhavn station emphasize passenger comfort with clear wayfinding elements and an abundance of lighting to provide comfort and safety. “Nordhavn is a city of sustainable mobility , where it is easier to walk, bike or use public transport, than it is to drive your own car,” said Dan Stubbergaard, architect and founder of Cobe. “The two metro stations unlock the potential of this new Copenhagen city district, enabling more efficient and sustainable transport between the individual neighborhoods, and to the rest of Copenhagen, while adding a new chapter to the story of the Copenhagen harbor front.” + Cobe + Arup Images via Rasmus Hjortshøj – COAST / COBE

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New metro stations extend sustainable, site-sensitive transit in Denmark

Discover the powers of nature in Denmarks newly opened NATURKRAFT exploratorium

June 17, 2020 by  
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Last week, Denmark’s NATURKRAFT officially opened to offer the public a new space for experiencing the “physical and aesthetic powers of nature.” Designed by Thøgersen & Stouby and SLA , the new landmark at the western coastal town of Ringkøbing is a 50-acre exploratorium showcasing the importance of environmental stewardship. The project, which was funded by private equity and the Municipality of Ringkøbing-Skjern, cost 300 million Danish kroner ($45,329,550) and is expected to attract 280,000 visitors annually. Naturkraft — Danish for “Nature Power” — consists of three connected zones that are separately guided by the themes of observation, participation and understanding. The first “observation” zone is marked by a 600-meter-long ring was that rises to a height of 12 meters and provides views of the Ringkøbing Fjord and the flat surrounding landscape. The second zone, which focuses on “participation,” comprises an inner nature and adventure park with playful installations and a 17-kilometer-long “cross section” of the local biotopes throughout the western Jutland of Denmark . Eight specially designed nature typologies are represented, from the sand dune and the heathland to the marsh and the carbon forest. Related: Climate-adaptive park in Copenhagen wins Arne of the Year Award The theme of “understanding” guided the creation of a 5,500-square-meter building for exhibitions. Located on the highest point of the ring wall, the building features a tent-like translucent facade constructed from lightweight ETFE to emphasize a constant connection to the outdoors. The inner nature arena also includes “dissemination installations” for furthering conversations on the importance of nature for humans. “Naturkraft is both about the visible nature powers that humans experience and use in nature, and about the deep-seated aesthetic sense of nature that nature phenomena awaken in us,” said Stig L. Andersson, design director and founding partner of SLA. “Nature is what allows us humans to live good and meaningful lives. For both survival and living. In Naturkraft we show how the use of natural processes can shape our future cities and communities. Not by hitherto destroying existing nature , but by learning from nature and living with and not against it.” + SLA Photography by Torben Petersen and Thøgersen&Stouby via SLA

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Discover the powers of nature in Denmarks newly opened NATURKRAFT exploratorium

Food waste startup backed by Oprah Winfrey snags $250 million

May 26, 2020 by  
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Food waste startup backed by Oprah Winfrey snags $250 million Heather Clancy Tue, 05/26/2020 – 06:01 While overall startup funding is down this quarter because of the economic disruption brought on by COVID-19, entrepreneurs focused on solving climate-related problems have been bucking the trend . This morning brings one of the biggest deals yet this year: an infusion of $250 million in new financing for food waste crusader Apeel Sciences . What’s more, the funding pushes the Santa Barbara, California-based company’s valuation to more than $1 billion — a status dubbed in VC circles as “unicorn.” Cumulatively speaking, Apeel has raised $360 million, including the new funding. The lead backer on the latest round is Singapore’s sovereign wealth fund GIC, which explicitly embeds sustainability considerations into its investments. Other “participating” investors are Viking Global Investors, Upfront Investors, Tao Capital Partners and Rock Creek Group. There are also two highly recognizable minority “non-participating” investors: pop star Katy Perry and media queen Oprah Winfrey, who previously invested in Apeel in 2019.  “I hate to see food wasted, when there are so many people in the world who are going without,” Winfrey said in the funding press release. “Apeel can extend the life of fresh produce, which is critical to our food supply and to our planet too.” Food waste is responsible for generating close to 6 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions: for perspective, that’s three times the amount generated by the aviation industry. The issue has been exacerbated by the pandemic: Farmers have been forced to bury vegetables and pour milk down drains, while livestock operations have been forced to euthanize animals with slaughtering capacity idled during the quarantine. Apeel, which got its start in 2012 with a grant by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, has attracted funding from many high-profile funds, such as Andreessen Horowitz, as well as several firms that have championed a focus on climate tech including S2G Ventures, DBL Partners and Powerplant Ventures. The startup’s product is literally a peel — made from fruit and vegetable matter — that can be used to coat everything from limes to avocados to mandarin oranges to apples. It’s applied in packaging facilities or warehouses using a water-based formula. That layer extends the shelf life of the produce so that it is less likely to spoil during its journey to the retailer and so that it lasts longer on display. The company says each item can last two to three times longer, because Apeel’s coating slows water loss and oxidation. What’s more, the coating is edible and because it’s made from plant matter, it can be used on organic products. One reason Apeel’s approach is so, well, appealing is that it’s intended to give nature a boost: fruits and vegetables already seal themselves with a substance called cutin; Apeel’s product helps make that seal last longer .   I think it gives confidence to put more product on the shelf. What we have seen is like a 50 percent [reduction] of waste, and then also a double-digit growth of sales. “I think it gives confidence to put more product on the shelf. What we have seen is like a 50 percent [reduction] of waste, and then also a double-digit growth of sales,” Adrielle Dankier, chief commercial officer for Nature’s Pride, a Dutch importer of fruits and vegetables that is applying Apeel to avocados, said in a customer video. Since 2018, the company has saved more than 3 million avocados by using the product, according to the testimonial. Other organizations featured in the customer video (below) are Cata Fresh, a Spanish exporter of everything from melons to onions, and Sage Fruit, which specializes in pears, cherries and apples. The company is working with suppliers, retails and growers — “ranging from smallholder farmers and local organic growers to the world’s largest food brands and retailers.”  Some of its partners include Kroger (the largest U.S. food retailer), Edeka (Germany’s biggest supermarket company) and Sailing Group (the largest retail group in Denmark). Apeel’s coating is being used in dozens of produce categories. This year, it could save up to 20 million pieces of fruit from going to waste in stores — it also can help extend the shelf life at home. The new funding will enable Apeel to continue is international expansion, especially in places such as sub-Saharan Africa, Central America and South America — places where there are higher rates of both food waste and food insecurity. The company operates primarily in the United States and Europe today. In a statement emailed to GreenBiz, a company spokesperson said interest in Apeel has grown since the pandemic. “Our capital raise comes at a critical time — making it possible to accelerate our efforts to improve resilience across the supply chain while it works to rebuild, and provide a better path forward now and into the future,” the Apeel spokesperson said in emailed answers to several questions submitted about the funding. “Food service organizations are also an integral part of the fresh food supply chain and another channel that has been greatly impacted as a result of the pandemic. Our efforts to improve efficiencies through the supply chain will absolutely include this sector, as well as work to help food service distributors and operators reduce waste.” Pull Quote I think it gives confidence to put more product on the shelf. What we have seen is like a 50 percent [reduction] of waste, and then also a double-digit growth of sales. Topics Food & Agriculture Climate Tech Food Waste Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Apeel coats fruits and vegetables with an edible layer that can is designed to extend shelf life by two to three times. Courtesy of Apeel Sciences Close Authorship

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Food waste startup backed by Oprah Winfrey snags $250 million

Henning Larsen unveils plans for Copenhagens first all-timber community

January 23, 2020 by  
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A sustainable, nature-filled neighborhood unlike any other in Denmark could soon take root just beyond Copenhagen’s city center. Scandinavian architecture firm Henning Larsen has collaborated with biologists and environmental engineers from MOE to design the Fælledby community, a proposal for Copenhagen’s first all-timber neighborhood. Proposed for a former dumping ground site, the development promotes sustainable living, a reduced carbon footprint and a harmonious relationship with nature. Designed to accommodate 7,000 residents on an 18.1-hectare project site, the Fælledby community features a hybrid architectural design that merges traditional Danish urban design with rural typologies and includes a mix of housing types. The development, which would be about the size of Billund, would be built in phases and comprise three radial village-like “cores” that accommodate about 2,300 people each. These cores are connected via a series of native-planted green corridors, thereby maximizing access to nature and ensuring free movement for local wildlife . For any given residence, nature will be less than a 2-minute walk away. Related: Henning Larsen completes award-winning Wave apartments in Denmark The green corridors will be part of the undeveloped habitat for local flora and fauna, which make up 40% of the development. Nature will also be integrated into the built environment with nests for songbirds and bats built into the walls of the houses. A pond that occupies the center of each of the three Fælledby “villages” will offer a habitat for frogs and salamanders, while community gardens would attract other local species and encourage neighborly relations. “Deciding to build the natural landscape around Fælledby comes with a commitment to balance people with nature,” said Signe Kongebro, partner at Henning Larsen. “Specifically, this means that our new district will be Copenhagen’s first built fully in wood and incorporating natural habitats that encourage richer growth for plants and animals. With the rural village as an archetype, we’re creating a city where biodiversity and active recreation define a sustainable pact between people and nature.” + Henning Larsen Images via Henning Larsen

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Henning Larsen unveils plans for Copenhagens first all-timber community

A nearly century-old Copenhagen school gets an eco-friendly makeover

January 14, 2020 by  
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Danish architectural practice JJW Architects has used recycled bricks and Cradle-to-Cradle certified mortar to renovate Copenhagen’s Grøndalsvængets School. Originally built in 1929, the building had long been hidden away from the surrounding neighborhood; this comprehensive transformation, completed in 2019, has now integrated the structure into the urban fabric. The school has also been expanded to support modern principles of learning and a larger educational program.  The Grøndalsvængets School renovation project targeted three main objectives: an improved connection with the neighborhood, new differentiated learning environments and sustainable building practices. To better integrate the school with its surroundings, the architects first took down the tall hedge that had visually separated the school from the city. The pair of two-story buildings that were added on the outer corners of the site are topped with gabled roofs in a nod to the pitched rooflines of the area. Related: A massive pollution-fighting green wall engulfs this Dutch city hall The two new buildings were built for teaching, sports and music and are part of a greater plan to cultivate a campus-like environment within the school. In addition to the renovation of the main building, the Grøndalsvængets School’s expansion focuses on creating a flexible and differentiated learning environment that can support the needs of its students. The two new buildings were built with recycled bricks from a nearby hospital and assembled with Cradle-to-Cradle certified mortar to ensure that those bricks can be reused again in the future as part of a long-term circular economy strategy. “The old school building becomes new and the new school buildings carry on an old story from the beginning,” the architects explained in a project statement. “ New and old meet each other in respect and create a school that is cohesive and interlinked with the surrounding neighborhood.” + JJW Architects Photography by Torben Eskerod via JJW Architects

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A nearly century-old Copenhagen school gets an eco-friendly makeover

A hotel suite inside a shipping container hovers over the landscape in Brazil

October 16, 2019 by  
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Brazilian architecture firm Bruno Zaitter arquiteto has once again given new life to a shipping container with the Bosque Refuge, one of the Hotel Fazenda Cainã suites in Balsa Nova, Brazil. Fitted with massive walls of glass to blur the line between indoors and out, the modern suite immerses guests into nature with breathtaking views and a natural materials palette. The recycled container is elevated on stilts and carefully sited to minimize landscape impact. Nicknamed Baruch Spinoza after the famous 17th-century Dutch philosopher, the compact hotel suite measures 58 square meters and features an open floor plan. The building was strategically placed for both privacy and views — the suite backs into a large native forest in the southwest and opens up to dramatic mountain views on the northeast side. The 12-meter-long container was modified to include the washroom facilities on one end, the kitchen on the other and the bedroom and living area in the middle. The container footprint was expanded with a precast metal structure to make room for the living space, entrance and an outdoor seating area. Related: 3 stacked shipping containers create a diving tower in Denmark “The outer connection — nature — and interior — refuge — forms the main inducing element of the design process of the refuge,” explained Bruno Zaitter in a project statement. “The concept of causing minimal impact to the natural environment made it possible to reach the formal architectural party where the purity of the right angles of volumetry and the facades with few elements further value the living and dynamic atmosphere of the environment.” To soften the building’s appearance and to create a cozy atmosphere, timber was used to the line the interiors and exteriors. The green wash on the exterior facade helps the building blend into the forested landscape. + Bruno Zaitter arquiteto Via ArchDaily Photography by Sergio Mendonca and Ale Carnieri via Bruno Zaitter arquiteto

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A hotel suite inside a shipping container hovers over the landscape in Brazil

A striking new gateway to Copenhagen celebrates green transit and Danish design

October 14, 2019 by  
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Earlier this summer, Copenhagen officially opened Køge Nord Station, a stunning new transportation landmark that raises the bar for beautiful urban infrastructure. Designed by COBE and DISSING+WEITLING architecture , the transit hub features a futuristic 225-meter-long covered footbridge that connects the new double-track high-speed rail line between Copenhagen and the city of Ringsted with the existing commuter urban-suburban S-train line. The 9-meter-wide footbridge spans the width of the Køge Bugt Highway and is punctuated with multiple windows to provide 180-degree panoramic views of the highway and the cultural landscape. Completed in less than three years after its groundbreaking, the Køge Nord Station is the result of an international competition that drew 38 submissions from around the world. Described by COBE and DISSING+WEITLING architecture as a “unique example of Danish architecture and engineering,” the firms’ winning design includes a vision plan, a train station, parking and transit facilities and the project’s crown jewel — the eye-catching covered footbridge . Installed in six sections, the footbridge is clad in 48,000 square meters of anodized aluminum panels and can carry up to 1,800 people. Related: Curvaceous bicycle bridge brings new life to Copenhagen’s harbor To provide a comfortable and attractive commuter experience for the 8,000 passengers expected to use the station daily, the interior of the covered bridge is lined with cozy timber and emphasizes a sense of continuous flow with curvaceous lines and open views to the north as well as with smaller south-facing apertures in the interior wood panels.  ”People spend many hours of their life in transit ,” said Jesper B. Henriksen, architect and partner at DISSING+WEITLING architecture. “That’s why we sought to give the footbridge a quality that goes beyond the purely functional and practical. The interior space is covered with wooden slats that provide a warm, tactile experience in transit and waiting situations. It is, quite simply, a welcoming and inviting space, unlike what you often see in stations and transport facilities. The interior space is contrasted by the smooth, cool aluminum exterior that enters into a dialogue with the infrastructural expression of the place.” + COBE + DISSING+WEITLING architecture Photography by Rasmus Hjortshøj – COAST via COBE

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A striking new gateway to Copenhagen celebrates green transit and Danish design

This self-sustaining planter doesn’t require sunlight for plants to thrive

August 27, 2019 by  
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Every gardener and plant enthusiast knows that plants grow best with access to sunlight, either direct or indirect. But one German company has expanded the options for people and places that don’t have access to plenty of light with the Mygdal Plantlight. Nui Studio designed the vessel to provide all the moisture and light a plant needs — it can successfully grow plants in a sunless urban basement or even in the long dark days of northern winter. With temperature control and easy setting adjustments, the Mygdal Plantlight is an option for every home or office. The combination of design and technology means plants receive optimal water and light for the perfect growing conditions. The glass-enclosed hanging pendant is hermetically sealed, creating a circular ecosystem so plants do not require watering. The cycle of condensation and evaporation provides enough moisture for the plants to thrive. Related: Rotating indoor garden grows up to 100 herbs and vegetables every month LED lights provide both light and adequate warmth to feed the environment and the plants. Schedule when and how long you want your plant to receive light. Plus, the Mygdal Plantlight serves as an attractive, additional source of light for any room. Adjustments for length of sunlight, intensity and even the color is controlled by a smartphone or tablet without the need to open the vessel. If you do need to access the plants, the pendant’s aluminum disc bottom is easy to remove. The Mygdal Plantlight offers versatility with a variety of plants ranging from lush to jungle to zen styles. The unit comes in two sizes for visual and spacial variety, and plants can easily be replaced when you’re ready for a change. The studio said, “The combination of plants and light inside Mygdal’s mouth-blown, hand-finished glass shade creates a soothing atmosphere. Its name is a tribute to glassmaker Peter Kuchinke from Mygdal in northern Denmark and means, loosely translated, ‘fertile soil.’” Nui Studio maintains a philosophy that a marriage between traditional craft and modern technology combined with regional manufacturing produces timeless and multifunctional furniture for everyone to enjoy. + Nui Studio Via Yanko Design Images via Nui Studio

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This self-sustaining planter doesn’t require sunlight for plants to thrive

Casa I combines traditional courtyard typology with modern construction in Chile

August 27, 2019 by  
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Santiago-based architects Alfredo Thiermann and Sebastián Cruz of architecture office Thiermann Cruz Arquitectos have completed a home that celebrates Chile’s once-popular courtyard housing typology — a residential style that has faded away in popularity since the second half of the 19th century. Rooted in a tradition of embracing outdoor space, the residence — simply dubbed Casa I — is also decidedly modern in design and construction and makes use of prefabricated elements such as cross-laminated timber and precast concrete panels. Spanning an area of 300 square meters, Casa I is located in a former suburb of Santiago on a lot that has been subdivided into three smaller pieces due to the pressures of urban densification. To make the most of its 20-by-40-meter site, the residence was conceived as a long and rectangular volume that, unlike its more conventionally designed neighbors, is flanked by usable outdoor space on all sides.  Related: A 1970 home gets a modern, light-filled revamp in Santiago Sliding and pivoting glazed doors blur the line between the indoors and outdoors and create a seamless connection to the courtyards to make the home feel much larger than its footprint suggests. The open-plan living room, dining area and kitchen also features sliding doors for a flexible layout. In contrast to its exposed concrete base and prefabricated black concrete paneling, the interior of the light-filled home feels warm and inviting thanks to the use of timber throughout. “Each interior space is connected, at least, with two exteriors, which are treated simultaneously as interiors though their large built furniture and materiality,” the architects explained. “Negotiating the irregular shape of the plot with the regular geometry of the house, its limit is set back a few meters behind the property line, and a walled courtyard elbows out from the continuous line defining the sidewalk. Overcoming the regulations promoting a garden city, the facade becomes a walled courtyard, bringing life to the edge of the otherwise lifeless suburban street.” + Thiermann Cruz Arquitectos Photography by Erieta Attali and William Rojas via Thiermann Cruz Arquitectos

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Casa I combines traditional courtyard typology with modern construction in Chile

Glowing, celestial-inspired shelter communes with nature in Denmark

August 8, 2019 by  
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The Munkeruphus Art Museum on the coast of Denmark has recently gained a striking new addition — the Observatory, an organic pavilion by Danish designer Simon Hjermind Jensen . The commission, which was supported by the Danish Arts Foundation and Knud Højgaards Fond, marks the start of the museum’s long-term vision for integrating art and nature-related projects on its grounds. Crafted with 3D modeling and CNC technology, the curvaceous pavilion has a cave-like interior that encourages visitors to gather within and reconnect with nature. When Jensen received the commission for the project, he started the design process with a 24-hour stay on the site to observe the landscape conditions from dawn to dusk as well as the trajectories of the sun and the moon. The site-specific study inspired the placement of the Observatory as well as the architectural design, which began with a ceramic model he crafted on-site. Related: A mountain refuge in Spain is brought back to life with brickwork Back at his studio, Jensen refined his concept with additional ceramic models before overlaying a construction pattern on top that was 3D-scanned for computer modeling . Finally, the pavilion shell was CNC-cut from plywood and polycarbonate, bent into place and fastened together with custom, leaf-inspired joinery. Thanks to parametric modeling, the Observatory is optimized for strength and material use. Measuring nearly 19 feet in height, the Observatory features an asymmetrical teardrop shape topped with an oculus angled toward the south, framing views of the moon and creating more access to natural light . Inside, the curved interior is weighed down by a gravel floor and includes a built-in wooden bench that accommodates 25 people as well as a concrete podium. The central fire pit, when lit, makes the pavilion glow at night. “Like the characters of our surroundings changes and shift from day to night, the Observatory changes too, especially when a bonfire is lit after nightfall.” Jensen said. “The inside spatial experience changes with the light coming from the ground and, seen from the outside, the upper part glows in a pink color created from the light from the flames.” + Simon Hjermind Jensen Images via Simon Hjermind Jensen

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