Demand is driving deforestation — what can companies do?

October 5, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Demand is driving deforestation — what can companies do?

Research found that 27 percent of global forest loss is caused by permanent commodity-driven deforestation-as-usual.

See original here:
Demand is driving deforestation — what can companies do?

How to conserve half the planet without going hungry

October 5, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on How to conserve half the planet without going hungry

In order to preserve biodiversity, we need to protect land — land that’s been resettled for agriculture.

Read the original post:
How to conserve half the planet without going hungry

Remembering the forgotten solutions

September 21, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Remembering the forgotten solutions

Natural climate soltions could provide more than a third of the emissions reductions we need — so why aren’t we paying attention to them?

Excerpt from:
Remembering the forgotten solutions

Better land use policies could move us closer to thwarting climate change

September 12, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Better land use policies could move us closer to thwarting climate change

Some insights from the global supply chain and sustainability chief of McDonald’s.

Read more from the original source:
Better land use policies could move us closer to thwarting climate change

Deforestation in South America causes extinction of 8 bird species

September 5, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Deforestation in South America causes extinction of 8 bird species

The Spix’s Macaw, a bird many would recognize as the star of the animated film Rio, is officially extinct. The macaw has been listed among eight bird species that have gone extinct in South America in the last decade in a new study conducted by BirdLife International . While the majority of bird extinctions are associated with island species sensitive to invasive organisms and hunting, these new extinctions are linked to a growing problem in South America: deforestation . Stuart Butchart, a scientist who lead the BirdLife International study, said that the extinctions in South America are proof that a crisis is currently unfolding in places that have historically been free of such events — and it’s all because of the destruction of natural habitats. In the past, about 90 percent of bird-related extinctions have been isolated to species on remote islands. But as Butchart points out, the new study indicates a rise in extinction events on large continents that are “driven by habitat loss from unsustainable agriculture, drainage and logging.” As it currently stands, there are more than 26,000 species on the verge of extinction. With that number continuing to rise, scientists warn that humans could usher in another global extinction event. Half of the birds that recently went extinct were native to Brazil. The Spix’s Macaw was last sighted in the wild in 2000, though the bird is being raised in captivity. Scientists hope to reintroduce the bird at some point in the future. Related: Scientists say mass extinction warning signs exist — and they can be observed today But that is not the case for many of the birds who have disappeared. The Alagoas Foliage-gleaner, the Cryptic Treehunter and the Poo-uli, for example, will never be seen again. Apart from the eight bird species that have already gone extinct, there are 51 others that are “ critically endangered .” Butchart and his team hope that their findings will promote future conservation efforts to save these bird species from becoming extinct. + BirdLife International Via The Guardian Images via Daderot and  Rüdiger Stehn

Read the original here: 
Deforestation in South America causes extinction of 8 bird species

Mass poaching in Botswana leaves behind 90 tuskless elephants

September 5, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Mass poaching in Botswana leaves behind 90 tuskless elephants

Ninety elephants have been poached in Botswana in what is being considered one of Africa’s grimmest mass poaching sprees. The majority of the creatures poached for their valuable ivory were large bull elephants who carry heavy tusks, according to a statement by Elephants Without Borders on Tuesday. The group had been conducting an aerial survey of the animals over several weeks in tandem with Botswana’s Department of Wildlife and National Parks when it made the discovery. “We started flying the survey on 10 July, and we have counted 90 elephant carcasses since the survey commenced,” said Mike Chase, director of Elephants Without Borders. “Each day, we are counting dead elephants.” It is clear that the elephants were hunted for ivory, despite the recent revocations of new ivory imports by large markets. The killing is supplying still-open routes to Asia, where a demand for fresh ivory is bankrolling poachers up to $1,000 per kilo. The carcasses were found mutilated with their skulls “chopped open by presumably very sharp axes, to remove their tusks” according to Chase, who also noted that in some cases the trunks of the animals had also gone missing. Related: The world’s largest ivory market just banned ivory Botswana is widely considered an elephant sanctuary compared to neighboring Zambia and Angola, where the creatures “have been poached to the verge of local extinction,” Chase said. It is no surprise that poachers are now turning to Botswana, as the previous “shoot-to-kill” policy against poachers has gone out the window. Moreover, rangers have been disarmed under the government of Mokgweetsi Masisi after former-President Ian Khama, who was vehement in his protection of wildlife , stepped down. Jason Bell, vice president for the International Fund for Animal Welfare , said, “Until now, Botswana’s elephant herds have largely been left in peace, but clearly Botswana is now in the cross-hairs.” Tourism Minister for Botswana, Tshekedi Khama also weighed in on the coinciding ranger disarmament and mass slaughter. “I am very concerned, it’s a huge worry … because we had been spared poaching for a long time, I think now we are realizing the sophistication of these poachers,” Khama said. “Unfortunately, sometimes we learn these lessons the hard way.” Botswana is home to the largest population of elephants in Africa , with nearly 135,000 of the majestic beasts roaming its lands. These numbers account for almost a third of all the elephants in Africa since numbers have plummeted to about 415,000 in the past decade,  according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature . “The scale of elephant poaching is by far the largest I have seen or read about in Africa to date,” Chase said. Related: The Trump Administration decides to allow the import of elephant trophies after all With rhinos also being targeted in Botswana — six white rhinos having been found butchered and stripped of their horns in recent months — a change in policy must be made. Government officials have declined to comment on any future plans to rectify the ranger policies or prevent future incidents. Via The Guardian Image via Letizia Barbi

See the original post here: 
Mass poaching in Botswana leaves behind 90 tuskless elephants

The biggest culprit behind climate change may surprise you

July 26, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on The biggest culprit behind climate change may surprise you

Because no one’s too transparent when it comes to their emissions.

Read the original:
The biggest culprit behind climate change may surprise you

Red List expands to 26,000 endangered species

July 6, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Red List expands to 26,000 endangered species

Japanese earthworms, the Mauritian flying fox and the Bankoualé Palm are joining over 26,000 species categorized as “endangered.” The latest International Union for Conservation of Nature (ICUN) Red List report  now identifies 26,197 plants and animals facing extinction, out of 93,557 facing serious environmental threats around the world. Australia’s reptile population possibly faces the most threats of all species. 975 reptiles native to the island — nearly every cold-blooded animal living there — have joined the list. In addition, seven percent of those are threatened with extinction due to changing environmental factors , including invasive species and climate change. Estimates from ICUN blame 600 million reptile deaths on feral cats, while a one-degree temperature change could cut the Bartle Frere cool-skink population by half over 30 years. Related: Conservationists sound alarm over US House bill that weakens Endangered Species Act While Australia is facing a mass extinction of reptiles, other areas across Asia could lose species over time. The Mauritian flying fox, an important pollinating species on Mauritius and Réunion, was also added to the endangered species list. Deforestation , cyclones, poaching and death from power lines have significantly reduced the population. In Japan, three species of earthworms were also added to the Red List and face extinction. Nuclear fallout from both World War II and the nuclear reactor meltdown in Fukushima, combined with over-farming and city growth, are threatening the species. Animals also aren’t the only species that face extinction before the century’s end. The Bankoualé palm, a plant native to Djibouti, Somalia and Yemen, may also be relegated to textbooks. Between deforestation, drought , destruction from farming and water redirection, the palm could disappear entirely from Yemen first, leaving the Horn of Africa as its only remaining habitat. Although the outlook is grim for the newly endangered species , all hope is not lost. The ICUN is actively working with local populations to ensure both plants and animals can continue to thrive for generations. In Mauritius, a task force is working with farmers to protect crops and orchards with nets and other deterrents, reducing the need for population culling. Via ICUN

Excerpt from: 
Red List expands to 26,000 endangered species

Forest certification remains a key weapon in the fight to save forests

May 25, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Forest certification remains a key weapon in the fight to save forests

Some estimates suggest that up to 30 percent of all timber traded globally may be illegally harvested.

Read the rest here:
Forest certification remains a key weapon in the fight to save forests

Here’s how to move LEED forward on climate change

May 25, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Here’s how to move LEED forward on climate change

The green building rating system must go further.

See the original post here:
Here’s how to move LEED forward on climate change

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1310 access attempts in the last 7 days.