5 reasons to be optimistic about reducing, and reversing, deforestation

January 21, 2019 by  
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Yes, more trees are falling, but the leading indicators suggest a brighter picture is taking root.

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5 reasons to be optimistic about reducing, and reversing, deforestation

Photosynthesis Is One-Third of the Answer to Mitigating Climate Change

December 13, 2018 by  
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Editor’s Note: Earth911 urges you to consider Health In Harmony … The post Photosynthesis Is One-Third of the Answer to Mitigating Climate Change appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Photosynthesis Is One-Third of the Answer to Mitigating Climate Change

Earth911 Quiz #41: Where Did All the Ice Go?

December 13, 2018 by  
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Arctic ice is vanishing. In recent weeks, new reports about … The post Earth911 Quiz #41: Where Did All the Ice Go? appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Earth911 Quiz #41: Where Did All the Ice Go?

Is palm oil the new plastic? Big brands and suppliers under fire over deforestation

November 23, 2018 by  
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The hot-button issue has raised new controversy as of late.

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Is palm oil the new plastic? Big brands and suppliers under fire over deforestation

One for Hundred a furniture company that grows more wood than it uses

November 1, 2018 by  
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One for Hundred , an Austrian furniture company, was founded on the belief that creating furniture doesn’t have to go hand-in-hand with destroying forests . With this philosophy in mind, Anna and Karl Philip Prinzhorn — the founders of One for Hundred — decided to plant 100 trees for every piece of wooden furniture that they sell. The decision about where to plant the trees and harvest the wood for the furniture was an easy one, because it all comes from the company’s own forest just outside of Vienna that has been in the family for seven generations, spanning ownership for more than 200 years. Because of this personal connection, the designers place emphasis on maintaining the health of a diverse blend of trees in the forest. Their goal is to use the trees to make quality wood pieces while simultaneously preserving the forest for the next generation. Related: Karton creates ultra-durable cardboard furniture for every room in your home While other manufacturers harvest and ship internationally, One for Hundred spins the sustainability dial way up with short forest-to-workshop travel requirements. In fact, the master craftspeople are located a short distance from the forest where the trees are harvested. Cut in the winter, the wood is sent to the craftspeople and dried for months before being turned into unique furniture pieces. Each piece of furniture is customizable to suit the customer’s preference of size, wood choice and color. Wood options include ash, oak, walnut, cherry, larch and maple. The One for Hundred furniture also includes the ability to be flat-packed, offering a storage solution and reducing shipping costs. The furnishings have a sleek, Scandinavian vibe with models including coffee and side tables, wall shelving, benches and media storage cabinets. The tree-to-table efforts of One for Hundred are being widely recognized, as can be seen in the company’s recent invitation to the Vienna Design Week 2018 as well as the Blickfang Vienna Fair. With a focus on the future as well as the present, Anna and Karl Philip hope to inspire sustainability in an industry often criticized as anything but. + One for Hundred Via Dwell Images via One for Hundred

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One for Hundred a furniture company that grows more wood than it uses

Demand is driving deforestation — what can companies do?

October 5, 2018 by  
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Research found that 27 percent of global forest loss is caused by permanent commodity-driven deforestation-as-usual.

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Demand is driving deforestation — what can companies do?

How to conserve half the planet without going hungry

October 5, 2018 by  
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In order to preserve biodiversity, we need to protect land — land that’s been resettled for agriculture.

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How to conserve half the planet without going hungry

Remembering the forgotten solutions

September 21, 2018 by  
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Natural climate soltions could provide more than a third of the emissions reductions we need — so why aren’t we paying attention to them?

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Remembering the forgotten solutions

Better land use policies could move us closer to thwarting climate change

September 12, 2018 by  
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Some insights from the global supply chain and sustainability chief of McDonald’s.

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Better land use policies could move us closer to thwarting climate change

Deforestation in South America causes extinction of 8 bird species

September 5, 2018 by  
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The Spix’s Macaw, a bird many would recognize as the star of the animated film Rio, is officially extinct. The macaw has been listed among eight bird species that have gone extinct in South America in the last decade in a new study conducted by BirdLife International . While the majority of bird extinctions are associated with island species sensitive to invasive organisms and hunting, these new extinctions are linked to a growing problem in South America: deforestation . Stuart Butchart, a scientist who lead the BirdLife International study, said that the extinctions in South America are proof that a crisis is currently unfolding in places that have historically been free of such events — and it’s all because of the destruction of natural habitats. In the past, about 90 percent of bird-related extinctions have been isolated to species on remote islands. But as Butchart points out, the new study indicates a rise in extinction events on large continents that are “driven by habitat loss from unsustainable agriculture, drainage and logging.” As it currently stands, there are more than 26,000 species on the verge of extinction. With that number continuing to rise, scientists warn that humans could usher in another global extinction event. Half of the birds that recently went extinct were native to Brazil. The Spix’s Macaw was last sighted in the wild in 2000, though the bird is being raised in captivity. Scientists hope to reintroduce the bird at some point in the future. Related: Scientists say mass extinction warning signs exist — and they can be observed today But that is not the case for many of the birds who have disappeared. The Alagoas Foliage-gleaner, the Cryptic Treehunter and the Poo-uli, for example, will never be seen again. Apart from the eight bird species that have already gone extinct, there are 51 others that are “ critically endangered .” Butchart and his team hope that their findings will promote future conservation efforts to save these bird species from becoming extinct. + BirdLife International Via The Guardian Images via Daderot and  Rüdiger Stehn

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Deforestation in South America causes extinction of 8 bird species

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