Dead Sea salt reveals drought on a scale never recorded – and it could happen again

March 29, 2017 by  
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Thick layers of Dead Sea salt found 1,000 feet below the sea bed holds clues to our planet’s past – and a warning. The salt reveals during warm periods in Earth’s history, the region – the Dead Sea is bordered by Palestine, Jordan, and Israel – suffered from drought with no known precedent. The salt, scrutinized by an international team of researchers led by Yael Kiro of Columbia University , doesn’t just offer a history lesson, but a caution climate change could seriously dry the region again in the future. Crystalline salt from beneath the Dead Sea reveals 120,000 and 10,000 years ago, rainfall in the area was a fifth of modern levels. These dry periods were naturally caused. But human-caused climate change today could potentially dry the region – which is already struggling – more than we realized. Right now the Middle East’s fresh water per capita availability is 10 times less than the world average, according to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. Related: Dramatic Video Captures Rebirth of the River Zin in Israel’s Negev Desert Back in 2010, scientists drilled 1,500 feet into the Dead Sea bed’s deepest part. They obtained a cross-section that provided 200,000 years of climate history in the area. Alternating layers of salt and mud showed dry and wet times. Only recently, however, did scientists analyze the core in great detail. The region suffered from what Columbia University called epic dry periods. Kiro said in a statement, “All the observations show this region is one of those most affected by modern climate change, and it’s predicted to get dryer. What we showed is that even under natural conditions, it can become much drier than predicted by any of our models.” The journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters published the research in an early online edition . Six other scientists from institutions in Israel and Spain also contributed to the study. Via The Guardian and Columbia University Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

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Dead Sea salt reveals drought on a scale never recorded – and it could happen again

The “Recrystallized Hotel” May Rise from Repurposed Dead Sea Salt Tiles

October 27, 2014 by  
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Every year, 20  million tons of salt sink to the bottom of the Dead Sea’s fifth pond. The salt is waste from the colossal production of potash and bromine in the Dead Sea Works factory, and it piles up on the bottom of the pool, raising rising water levels. As a result, the hotels on the shore face flooding and collapse. This led Erez Nevi Pana to contemplate what might be done with the salt: would it be possible to use the abundant residual salt from the factories as an economically viable resource? Recrystallizing the Desert examines the development of a production method with salt as the main substance, using solar energy to create compressed salt tiles. These tiles can be used like marble for flooring and walls, thus utilizing waste and transforming it into a building material: the Recystallized Hotel is a conceptual structure in which this material is used throughout the hotel, both structurally, and for decorative purposes. + The Recrystallized Hotel Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: building with salt , compressed salt , Dead Sea , Dead Sea salt , Erez Nevi Pana , hotel , hotels , ocean salt , recrystallizing the desert , recycled salt , Recystallized Hotel , reused salt , salt , salt building , salt hotel , salt hotels , salt marble , salt marble tiles , salt tiles , Solar Power

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The “Recrystallized Hotel” May Rise from Repurposed Dead Sea Salt Tiles

What Food Do We Throw Away the Most? (Infographic)

October 27, 2014 by  
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How many times have you bought a bunch of bananas only to have them go brown in a matter of days? And how many times have you thrown away wilted salad? Kitchen designer Noel Dempsey sent over this food waste infographic, which outlines just how much perfectly good food the Irish throw away each year. Even though this particular study addresses the behavior of Irish households, we think it’s globally relevant. For example, one study finds that reducing food waste could feed an additional one billion people . Hit the jump to check out this illuminating infographic about food waste, and let us know in the comments what we can do to prevent this disturbing trend. Read the rest of What Food Do We Throw Away the Most? (Infographic) Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: food thrown away , food waste , infographic , infographic about food waste , ireland food waste , obesity , reader submissions , UK food waste , user generated content , wasting food , world hunger

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What Food Do We Throw Away the Most? (Infographic)

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