Too much antimatter is hitting Earth and scientists aren’t sure why

November 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Too much antimatter is hitting Earth and scientists aren’t sure why

Among the cosmic rays that normally immerse the Earth, scientists say there are too many high-energy positrons, the antimatter counterparts of electrons. Now a group of researchers from the United States, Mexico, Germany, and Poland are attempting to shed light on the mystery, and if they’re right, according to the Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN), the excess positrons might be “the first particles recorded by humans to be derived from the interaction of dark matter .” In 2008, a probe in our planet’s orbit detected more positrons reaching us than scientists would anticipate. So a large team conducted observations at the recently activated High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory in Mexico to see if pulsars were the source of these baffling extra positrons. They analyzed data from two relatively close pulsars around 800 and 900 light years away. These pulsars, Geminga and PSR B0656+14, are “among the strongest sources of cosmic rays in our region of the galaxy,” according to IFJ PAN. Related: Scientists observe light spectrum of antimatter for the first time ever The pulsars, albeit responsible for some of the positrons, contributed too small an amount to account for all the antimatter hitting Earth. Instead, the researchers’ observations bolstered a competing hypothesis IFJ PAN described as much more exotic: the “annihilation or decay or dark matter” could be the origin of the positrons. If the hypothesis is correct – and we won’t know for sure until future observations back it up or not – these perplexing positrons would be the first particles we’ve ever recorded coming from the interaction of dark matter. The journal Science recently published the research . The University of Utah led the international team. Via the Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences and ScienceAlert Images via John Pretz/IFJ PAN and Jordan A. Goodman/IFJ PAN

The rest is here:
Too much antimatter is hitting Earth and scientists aren’t sure why

This prefab Escape Pod rotates to catch the suns rays

November 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on This prefab Escape Pod rotates to catch the suns rays

Dreaming of your very own backyard escape? The cozy Escape Pod may be just what you’re looking for. UK-based firm Podmakers designed and crafted the Escape Pod, a cedar shingle-clad prefabricated unit that can be tailored to suit a variety of uses, including garden room and writer’s studio. The spherical unit takes inspiration from nature, from its round organic shape to the extensive use of timber inside and out. Designed to meet local UK planning laws, each 7-square-meter Escape Pod is built offsite in a Gloucestershire workshop and then delivered and installed using a forklift or crane. The pod is elevated half a meter off the ground and can be rotated to optimize natural light and views through European Oak-framed windows. An aircraft-style plug door opens up to a snug adaptable interior outfitted with insulation, electrical wiring, and heating (choice of a wood-burning stove or underfloor heating). “The organic nature of the Escape Pod’s materials contrasts with the engineering employed in its design,” write Podmakers. “To achieve its curved form, the pod’s design exploits innovative CNC milling and making techniques. This enables it to be fabricated with precision in the workshop, entirely from wood. Birch plywood , chosen for its strength and aesthetic qualities, forms the structure. It is exposed internally; from the pod’s framework to the bespoke laminated door hinge.” Related: Archipod’s Spherical Garden Office Pod The base price for the Escape Pod starts at £19,800. Podmakers developed four recommended layouts—garden room, office, snug (bedroom), and work studio—however the pod can be customized to meet different needs. + Podmakers Via ArchDaily Images © Tim Brotherton

Read the original post: 
This prefab Escape Pod rotates to catch the suns rays

Scientists capture first ever image of dark matter web that connects galaxies

April 12, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Scientists capture first ever image of dark matter web that connects galaxies

For the first time ever, scientists have captured an image of a dark matter bridge, confirming the theory that galaxies are held together by a cosmic web. Until now, the massive dark matter web was hidden to us, but using a series of individual images to create a composite, researchers have identified the elusive cosmic connector. Dark matter makes up about a quarter of the universe, but it is difficult for us to detect it because it doesn’t reflect or shine light. But using a technique called weak gravitational lensing, researchers were able to identify distortions of distant galaxies as they are influenced by a large, unseen mass, such as dark matter. Related: Newly discovered ‘ghost galaxy’ full of dark matter is as big as the Milky Way The scientists looked at more than 23,000 galaxy pairs to create a composite image that shows the dark matter web for the first time. Researchers published their findings in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society . “By using this technique, we’re not only able to see that these dark matter filaments in the universe exist, we’re able to see the extent to which these filaments connect galaxies together,” said Seth D. Epps, one of the scientists, along with Michael J. Hudson, who completed the research. via Phys.org images via Epps and Hudson, The weak-lensing masses of filaments between luminous red galaxies

Read more here:
Scientists capture first ever image of dark matter web that connects galaxies

Physicists announce the "possible discovery" of a fifth force of nature

August 17, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Physicists announce the "possible discovery" of a fifth force of nature

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have announced the ‘possible discovery’ of a previously unknown subatomic particle that, if confirmed, could unlock the secrets of dark matter. The discovery would represent a fifth force of nature in the form of a mysterious new particle. Theoretical physicists at UCI now believe the particle, initially theorized by a team of Hungarian researchers last year, could be a newly discovered light particle that adds a fifth component to the four known forces of nature, or even a “grander, more fundamental force” when combined with one of the existing forces. A previous study by experimental nuclear physicists at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences identified an “excess of events” suggesting the existence of a new light particle 30 times heavier than an electron. At the time, there wasn’t enough evidence to explain whether it was a particle capable of transferring force, or simply a matter particle. It wasn’t until the UCI team of theoretical physicists got ahold of the study that discussions about a possible fifth force of nature began to surface. Related: Newly discovered form of spiralized light breaks everything quantum physics says about photons “If true, it’s revolutionary,” said Jonathan Feng, UCI professor of physics & astronomy. “For decades, we’ve known of four fundamental forces: gravitation , electromagnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear forces. If confirmed by further experiments, this discovery of a possible fifth force would completely change our understanding of the universe, with consequences for the unification of forces and dark matter.” Instead of being a dark photon , like the Hungarian experimentalists theorized, UCI physicists suggest the particle may be a “protophobic X boson.” Analysis co-author Timothy Tait, professor of physics & astronomy, said, “There’s no other boson that we’ve observed that has this same characteristic. Sometimes we also just call it the ‘X boson,’ where ‘X’ means unknown.” The findings were recently published in the journal Physical Review Letters. + Physical Review Letters Via Phys.org Images via ESA/Hubble & NASA and MTA-Atomki

See original here:
Physicists announce the "possible discovery" of a fifth force of nature

Astrophysicists draw most comprehensive map of the universe to date, secrets remain

April 30, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Astrophysicists draw most comprehensive map of the universe to date, secrets remain

A new map of the universe—the most comprehensive to date—boldly goes where no map has gone before. An international team of astrophysicists have crafted a 3D map that includes galaxies from across almost two billion light years. In doing so, they have provided an astrological resource unprecedented in its completeness. The detailed spherical map can be used to more definitely determine how matter is distributed throughout the universe. “The galaxy distribution isn’t uniform and has no pattern. It has peaks and valleys much like a mountain range,” said Professor Mike Hudson of University of Waterloo  in Canada, co-creator of the map. Read the rest of Astrophysicists draw most comprehensive map of the universe to date, secrets remain Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3D Map , 3D Universe Map , astronomy , Complete Universe Map , dark matter , Galaxies , Galaxy , New Space Map , New Space Models , outer space , space , Star Map , Universe , Universe Expansion , Universe Map

Read more here: 
Astrophysicists draw most comprehensive map of the universe to date, secrets remain

NASA To Turn Former Spy Satellites Into Galactic Observers

June 6, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on NASA To Turn Former Spy Satellites Into Galactic Observers

Two satellites, formerly owned by the  National Reconnaissance Office (who operate all of the US spy satellites), have been given to NASA for use. The satellites, which are approximately the same size as the Hubble Telescope , are to be reconfigured so that instead of staring down at Earth, they will look out into the cosmos. Read the rest of NASA To Turn Former Spy Satellites Into Galactic Observers Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: dark energy , dark matter , hubble , nasa , national reconnaisannce office , satellites , spy satellites , telescopes

The rest is here: 
NASA To Turn Former Spy Satellites Into Galactic Observers

Bad Behavior has blocked 971 access attempts in the last 7 days.